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NVIDIA announce the RTX 3090, RTX 3080, RTX 3070 with 2nd generation RTX

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Today the 'Ultimate Countdown' from NVIDIA ended with the announcement of the RTX 3090, RTX 3080 and the RTX 3070, all of them being absolute monsters with 2nd generation RTX. Powered by their Ampere generation, this definitely sounds like a big generational leap. It's really easy to be excited about it and I am.

Not just in terms of power, the price of the main two RTX 3080 and the RTX 3070 puts them well in line with the current 20xx generation which is pretty amazing for the difference in power. We need to take anything with a pinch of salt though of course, until independent benchmarks can be done.

Here's some shots from the presentation:

Meanwhile, the RTX 3090 is aimed at replacing the TITAN GPUs they did previously. A true overkill GPU, which they claim will let you play 8K.

Full specifications:

  GeForce RTX
3090
GeForce RTX
3080
GeForce RTX
3070
NVIDIA CUDA® Cores 10496 8704 5888
Boost Clock (GHz) 1.70 1.71 1.73
Standard Memory Config 24 GB GDDR6X 10 GB GDDR6X 8 GB GDDR6
Memory Interface Width 384-bit 320-bit 256-bit
Ray Tracing Cores 2nd Generation 2nd Generation 2nd Generation
Tensor Cores 3rd Generation 3rd Generation 3rd Generation
NVIDIA Architecture Ampere Ampere Ampere
NVIDIA DLSS Yes Yes Yes
PCI Express Gen 4 Yes Yes Yes
NVIDIA G-SYNC® Yes Yes Yes
Vulkan RT API, OpenGL 4.6 Yes Yes Yes
HDMI 2.1 Yes Yes Yes
DisplayPort 1.4a Yes Yes Yes
NVIDIA Encoder 7th Generation 7th Generation 7th Generation
NVIDIA Decoder 5th Generation 5th Generation 5th Generation
VR Ready Yes Yes Yes
Maximum Digital Resolution (1) 7680x4320 7680x4320 7680x4320
Standard Display Connectors HDMI 2.1, 3x DisplayPort 1.4a HDMI 2.1, 3x DisplayPort 1.4a HDMI 2.1, 3x DisplayPort 1.4a
Multi Monitor 4 4 4
HDCP 2.3 2.3 2.3
Length 12.3" (313 mm) 11.2" (285 mm) 9.5" (242 mm)
Width 5.4" (138 mm) 4.4" (112 mm) 4.4" (112 mm)
Height 3-Slot 2-Slot 2-Slot
Maximum GPU Temperature (in C) 93 93 93
Graphics Card Power (W) 350 320 220
Recommended System Power (W) (2) 750 750 650
Supplementary Power Connectors 2x PCIe 8-pin 2x PCIe 8-pin 1x PCIe 8-pin

On top of all that, they're also the first to come with support for the AV1 codec, which is very promising for being more efficient and more feature-filled than older popular codecs.

Pricing / Availability

  • RTX 3090 - £1,399 / $1,499 - Available September 24th
  • RTX 3080 - £649 / $699 - Available September 17th
  • RTX 3070 - £469 / $499 - Available October (no exact date given)

Each will also have a special Founders edition available, which an increased price.

When going by price to performance ratio, the RTX 3070 sounds absolutely ridiculous. If (big if), it truly has the RTX 2080 ti level performance for a vastly cheaper sum then it alone could help usher in a new level of gaming performance for a great many people. More GPUs based on Ampere will be coming, as these are just the first. I can't help but think about the RTX 3060, whenever they announce one that is. Considering the power of the RTX 3070, the RTX 3060 is quite likely to be a mega deal for people after both performance and an affordable price. Also makes me curious even more so now on Intel, as they announced their Xe-HPG gaming GPUs which arrive next year. Then we have AMD too with RDNA2 which is supposed to be this year. So much to look forward to for hardware enthusiasts!

Since NVIDIA support Ray Tracing already on Linux with their own extensions, and they already have early support for the vendor-neutral provisional Ray Tracing extensions in Vulkan it's going to be very interesting to see just how far developers will push it. Ideally though, we need more games on Linux that use it.

For those of you who really do love the serious technical side of it, NVIDIA has announced the release of a 'whitepaper' on the RTX 30 series which will be available on September 17. They say it will give a lot of detail on every aspect of the new cards in 'exhaustive detail'.

Other Windows-only stuff was announced too of course like RTX for Fortnite, a new 'NVIDIA Broadcast' effects suite application for livestreamers like backgrounds and noise removal, another RTX-powered application for video editing and more. Not that any of it matters for Linux users and gamers - sadly.

You can watch the whole thing below and see the announcement here.

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Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
Tags: Hardware, NVIDIA
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61 comments
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Quoting: Patola
Quoting: Swiftpaw
Quoting: kokoko3kI just hope old gpu prices goes down, but it never happens.

They'd really prefer to price gouge you at all points in time, not just at release.

All that needs to be done is:

a) passing laws that force companies (...).

How about the complete opposite? Throw away all laws that currently pose an obstacle to competitors, don't force companies to anything. New players on the market will appear trying hard to get their niche, boom, prices drop. This is actually happening with VR sets right now.

Creating more laws against businesses does not make things better for the consumers. It onerates the entire production chain and makes it harder for everyone to get that. And it keeps competitors away for the big players. That's exactly what you don't want to happen.

Yeah but no regulations gets what we have right now in many examples on many markets: big players buying smaller ones thus swallowing the competition and creating monopolies which is absolutely bad for consumers too. There is no definitive answer to that. There must be some regulations mechanisms to prevent that. The magic thought of the free market that generates it's own competition is a myth too.


Last edited by Mohandevir on 1 September 2020 at 7:07 pm UTC
Anyone interested in buying my MSI 2080Ti GamingX Trio for 600eur?
No?
...
Didn't think so...
...
...
...
Yes, butthurt... much. That's what I get for being a douche and paying too much for a GPU.
Quoting: ShmerlI'm waiting for RDNA 2 as well. Even if Nvidia will claim 3x increase in performance, it won't impress me until they'll upstream their drivers.

Seriously, I'm more hyped about the RX 5300 launch than this one.

https://videocardz.com/newz/amd-quietly-launches-radeon-rx-5300-graphics-cards

... But, OEM only... Snif!


Last edited by Mohandevir on 1 September 2020 at 7:15 pm UTC
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  • Supporter Plus
Quoting: Patola
Quoting: Swiftpaw
Quoting: kokoko3kI just hope old gpu prices goes down, but it never happens.

They'd really prefer to price gouge you at all points in time, not just at release.

All that needs to be done is:

a) passing laws that force companies (...).

How about the complete opposite? Throw away all laws that currently pose an obstacle to competitors, don't force companies to anything. New players on the market will appear trying hard to get their niche, boom, prices drop. This is actually happening with VR sets right now.

Creating more laws against businesses does not make things better for the consumers. It onerates the entire production chain and makes it harder for everyone to get that. And it keeps competitors away for the big players. That's exactly what you don't want to happen.
A big problem is that all the players in a market tend to end up being bought out by the larger players. That's basically just part of capitalism. Like 3DFx was huge back in the day, but they couldn't get a normal 2d/3d card out to save their lives, so nvidia bought them. That gave them the bit of edge they needed over their rivals, and I'm not sure anyone has really been able to catch up since. All the others ended up being bought by someone else, or just called it quits, like Matrox just gave upon being consumer GPUs, and go for the prosumer / multi-monitor company.

Anyhow, I'm wanting to know what the performance of DLSS and VR games are! I mean if we can get 100% solid frames at 144hz on the Index... that'd be hella-cool.
peta77 1 Sep
Quoting: Patola.....
New players on the market will appear trying hard to get their niche, boom, prices drop. This is actually happening with VR sets right now.
....

Nice thought, but I don't think things are that simple. GPU development is a complex and expensive process. And production (plants, etc.) of those things also add to the cost that has to be recovered by sales. More vendors, lower sales -> higher prices. Like there was before when many others were there. The differences in performance where surely very big, but so were also the prices, up to 20k $ for the high end stuff. Now you get the max. available performance for about 1k or 1.5k (the Quadros or FirePro aren't really faster). It's like with car production: manufacture only a couple of dozen of them and a compact car will cost the same as a Ferrari. The production amount really makes a huge difference.
Quoting: slaapliedje... Like 3DFx was huge back in the day, but they couldn't get a normal 2d/3d card out to save their lives, so nvidia bought them....

Or when ATI got bought by AMD...
lejimster 1 Sep
The pricing is disgusting and it's sad that this has become "normal". Wake me when AMD finally brings competition and prices drop.
chelobaka 1 Sep
AMD would have to set Big Navi price around $500-550 to compete with Ampere since rumors were it's slightly faster than RTX2080Ti. I can't remember such a huge leap in performance per dollar for graphics cards before.


Last edited by chelobaka on 1 September 2020 at 8:13 pm UTC
FerroTiC 1 Sep
I am really not looking forward to the times that label "sweet-spot mainstream graphic card" at 700 $, give or take a hundred.
Quoting: FerroTiCI am really not looking forward to the times that label "sweet-spot mainstream graphic card" at 700 $, give or take a hundred.

It must not happen, else cloud gaming might become the real deal. Personnally, PC gaming will become a thing of the past, if it ever happens.
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