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NVIDIA announce the RTX 3090, RTX 3080, RTX 3070 with 2nd generation RTX

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Today the 'Ultimate Countdown' from NVIDIA ended with the announcement of the RTX 3090, RTX 3080 and the RTX 3070, all of them being absolute monsters with 2nd generation RTX. Powered by their Ampere generation, this definitely sounds like a big generational leap. It's really easy to be excited about it and I am.

Not just in terms of power, the price of the main two RTX 3080 and the RTX 3070 puts them well in line with the current 20xx generation which is pretty amazing for the difference in power. We need to take anything with a pinch of salt though of course, until independent benchmarks can be done.

Here's some shots from the presentation:

Meanwhile, the RTX 3090 is aimed at replacing the TITAN GPUs they did previously. A true overkill GPU, which they claim will let you play 8K.

Full specifications:

  GeForce RTX
3090
GeForce RTX
3080
GeForce RTX
3070
NVIDIA CUDA® Cores 10496 8704 5888
Boost Clock (GHz) 1.70 1.71 1.73
Standard Memory Config 24 GB GDDR6X 10 GB GDDR6X 8 GB GDDR6
Memory Interface Width 384-bit 320-bit 256-bit
Ray Tracing Cores 2nd Generation 2nd Generation 2nd Generation
Tensor Cores 3rd Generation 3rd Generation 3rd Generation
NVIDIA Architecture Ampere Ampere Ampere
NVIDIA DLSS Yes Yes Yes
PCI Express Gen 4 Yes Yes Yes
NVIDIA G-SYNC® Yes Yes Yes
Vulkan RT API, OpenGL 4.6 Yes Yes Yes
HDMI 2.1 Yes Yes Yes
DisplayPort 1.4a Yes Yes Yes
NVIDIA Encoder 7th Generation 7th Generation 7th Generation
NVIDIA Decoder 5th Generation 5th Generation 5th Generation
VR Ready Yes Yes Yes
Maximum Digital Resolution (1) 7680x4320 7680x4320 7680x4320
Standard Display Connectors HDMI 2.1, 3x DisplayPort 1.4a HDMI 2.1, 3x DisplayPort 1.4a HDMI 2.1, 3x DisplayPort 1.4a
Multi Monitor 4 4 4
HDCP 2.3 2.3 2.3
Length 12.3" (313 mm) 11.2" (285 mm) 9.5" (242 mm)
Width 5.4" (138 mm) 4.4" (112 mm) 4.4" (112 mm)
Height 3-Slot 2-Slot 2-Slot
Maximum GPU Temperature (in C) 93 93 93
Graphics Card Power (W) 350 320 220
Recommended System Power (W) (2) 750 750 650
Supplementary Power Connectors 2x PCIe 8-pin 2x PCIe 8-pin 1x PCIe 8-pin

On top of all that, they're also the first to come with support for the AV1 codec, which is very promising for being more efficient and more feature-filled than older popular codecs.

Pricing / Availability

  • RTX 3090 - £1,399 / $1,499 - Available September 24th
  • RTX 3080 - £649 / $699 - Available September 17th
  • RTX 3070 - £469 / $499 - Available October (no exact date given)

Each will also have a special Founders edition available, which an increased price.

When going by price to performance ratio, the RTX 3070 sounds absolutely ridiculous. If (big if), it truly has the RTX 2080 ti level performance for a vastly cheaper sum then it alone could help usher in a new level of gaming performance for a great many people. More GPUs based on Ampere will be coming, as these are just the first. I can't help but think about the RTX 3060, whenever they announce one that is. Considering the power of the RTX 3070, the RTX 3060 is quite likely to be a mega deal for people after both performance and an affordable price. Also makes me curious even more so now on Intel, as they announced their Xe-HPG gaming GPUs which arrive next year. Then we have AMD too with RDNA2 which is supposed to be this year. So much to look forward to for hardware enthusiasts!

Since NVIDIA support Ray Tracing already on Linux with their own extensions, and they already have early support for the vendor-neutral provisional Ray Tracing extensions in Vulkan it's going to be very interesting to see just how far developers will push it. Ideally though, we need more games on Linux that use it.

For those of you who really do love the serious technical side of it, NVIDIA has announced the release of a 'whitepaper' on the RTX 30 series which will be available on September 17. They say it will give a lot of detail on every aspect of the new cards in 'exhaustive detail'.

Other Windows-only stuff was announced too of course like RTX for Fortnite, a new 'NVIDIA Broadcast' effects suite application for livestreamers like backgrounds and noise removal, another RTX-powered application for video editing and more. Not that any of it matters for Linux users and gamers - sadly.

You can watch the whole thing below and see the announcement here.

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Tags: Hardware, NVIDIA
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61 comments
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Patola 1 Sep
Quoting: slaapliedje
Quoting: Patola
Quoting: Swiftpaw
Quoting: kokoko3kI just hope old gpu prices goes down, but it never happens.

They'd really prefer to price gouge you at all points in time, not just at release.

All that needs to be done is:

a) passing laws that force companies (...).

How about the complete opposite? Throw away all laws that currently pose an obstacle to competitors, don't force companies to anything. New players on the market will appear trying hard to get their niche, boom, prices drop. This is actually happening with VR sets right now.

Creating more laws against businesses does not make things better for the consumers. It onerates the entire production chain and makes it harder for everyone to get that. And it keeps competitors away for the big players. That's exactly what you don't want to happen.
A big problem is that all the players in a market tend to end up being bought out by the larger players. That's basically just part of capitalism. (...)
And that happens because of the State -- specially laws and regulations --, not in spite of it. Big businesses do constantly skew the perception of the public to make it look like there is lack of regulations, and they win double by more and more obstacles which they are able to work with but not their smaller competitors. A freer market with no rules and thus no barrier against newcomers would be the best deterrent against monopolies. Sure, I understand there is a complex production chain, but these very same suppliers would benefit from more customers too, so it's not this chain that prevents competition. Conversely, it's hopeless to try and use the State against the big guys, they are best buddies and will use this whole perception to their profit.


Last edited by Patola on 1 September 2020 at 8:32 pm UTC
Swiftpaw 1 Sep
Quoting: Patola
Quoting: slaapliedje
Quoting: Patola
Quoting: Swiftpaw
Quoting: kokoko3kI just hope old gpu prices goes down, but it never happens.

They'd really prefer to price gouge you at all points in time, not just at release.

All that needs to be done is:

a) passing laws that force companies (...).

How about the complete opposite? Throw away all laws that currently pose an obstacle to competitors, don't force companies to anything. New players on the market will appear trying hard to get their niche, boom, prices drop. This is actually happening with VR sets right now.

Creating more laws against businesses does not make things better for the consumers. It onerates the entire production chain and makes it harder for everyone to get that. And it keeps competitors away for the big players. That's exactly what you don't want to happen.
A big problem is that all the players in a market tend to end up being bought out by the larger players. That's basically just part of capitalism. (...)
And that happens because of the State -- specially laws and regulations --, not in spite of it. Big businesses do constantly skew the perception of the public to make it look like there is lack of regulations, and they win double by more and more obstacles which they are able to work with but not their smaller competitors. A freer market with no rules and thus no barrier against newcomers would be the best deterrent against monopolies. Sure, I understand there is a complex production chain, but these very same suppliers would benefit from more customers too, so it's not this chain that prevents competition. Conversely, it's hopeless to try and use the State against the big guys, they are best buddies and will use this whole perception to their profit.

Removing laws that prevent a business from polluting will suddenly stop pollution?

I guess we should make murder legal too so that all murder stops.

As for prices and wages, capitalism is a failure and laws are made in order to prop up capitalism from failing. Without laws such as anti-monopoly ones, you get monopolies. That is the natural order of things. You can't have infinite competition, especially on a finite planet, and that competition doesn't necessarily magically result in lower prices especially once you get duopolies/monopolies/etc because if the controllers of production seek higher prices then no one cares about trying to give cheap prices because that stops making them more money at a certain point (lowering prices more doesn't result in increased number of sales/money). The only thing that really kept capitalism afloat anytime in history where there weren't yet laws stopping them from doing evil things is because the controllers of production had morals.

It's not efficient to have ten different delivery trucks driving down a neighborhood street. It's the cheapest and most efficient to have ONE, and one that is owned by the people or has laws preventing profiteering so that everyone gets the cheapest service possible. As long as that service is democratically and decently managed like the USPS here in the U.S., it will always be the best system. The only way to have that kind of efficiency with capitalism would be to have a monopoly, but then you'd instantly get price gouging unless you had laws to ensure that they were fair and not abusive like that. Why have a mini economic dictatorship entity like that when you can have it democratized instead and owned by the workers or the public at large?

Capitalism ALWAYS results in monopolies and extreme profiteering without laws to stop the greed from spiralling out of control, but inevitably capitalism also corrupts the government to undermine all that which is why so many monopolies reign supreme right now because of corrupt governments.

Likewise, I can also argue that governments ALWAYS are susceptible to corruption and ineptitude, and that's why having watchdogged democratic governments to prevent such abuse is required.


Last edited by Swiftpaw on 1 September 2020 at 8:56 pm UTC
mrdeathjr 1 Sep
Quoting: KallestofelesAnyone interested in buying my MSI 2080Ti GamingX Trio for 600eur?
No?
...
Didn't think so...
...
...
...
Yes, butthurt... much. That's what I get for being a douche and paying too much for a GPU.

yeah poor gtx 2080ti, many memes selling around 450us

m2mg2 1 Sep
Quoting: Patola
Quoting: slaapliedje
Quoting: Patola
Quoting: Swiftpaw
Quoting: kokoko3kI just hope old gpu prices goes down, but it never happens.

They'd really prefer to price gouge you at all points in time, not just at release.

All that needs to be done is:

a) passing laws that force companies (...).

How about the complete opposite? Throw away all laws that currently pose an obstacle to competitors, don't force companies to anything. New players on the market will appear trying hard to get their niche, boom, prices drop. This is actually happening with VR sets right now.

Creating more laws against businesses does not make things better for the consumers. It onerates the entire production chain and makes it harder for everyone to get that. And it keeps competitors away for the big players. That's exactly what you don't want to happen.
A big problem is that all the players in a market tend to end up being bought out by the larger players. That's basically just part of capitalism. (...)
And that happens because of the State -- specially laws and regulations --, not in spite of it. Big businesses do constantly skew the perception of the public to make it look like there is lack of regulations, and they win double by more and more obstacles which they are able to work with but not their smaller competitors. A freer market with no rules and thus no barrier against newcomers would be the best deterrent against monopolies. Sure, I understand there is a complex production chain, but these very same suppliers would benefit from more customers too, so it's not this chain that prevents competition. Conversely, it's hopeless to try and use the State against the big guys, they are best buddies and will use this whole perception to their profit.

This is a huge fantasy. No system of capitalism in the history of the world has functioned that way. The problem with all systems is that humans are flawed and prone to corruption and greed. The best system is a combination of things. Regulations are necessary because unregulated companies will abuse workers, pollute, poison people and every other horrible thing that would make them a quick buck. To much regulation does hurt productivity and can stifle an economy. Capitalism is basically a free for all law of nature. In that system the strong destroy the weak, there is slavery, torture and all kinds of horrors. Socialism doesn't contain enough incentive for progress but has too much incentive for government corruption as it is the primary path to accumulate more power than a person can get on their own. That amount of power leads to similar types of horrors in many cases. A mixture of democracy,capitalism and socialism provides some checks and balances of each of the different parts. The big problem the US has right now is that our democracy has been hijacked by the rich. Money has been equated to speech by the supreme court and obviously politicians will listen more closely to whoever gives them the most money. The poor and working class have no real voice in government, only given lip service. The government is owned by the mega rich/corporate world, in this way it is almost pure capitalism. Whoever can pay the government the most, gets what they want. The rest of the system is just a show.

None of this really relates to the new NVidia cards. I personally am all in AMD, even with amdgpu's horrible ootb monitor support. I am in full agreement that GPU prices are way out of control, 300 to 400 dollars as far as I'm concerned is the most a cpu or gpu should cost. I paid a little over $300 for my AMD 5700 and it's been awesome for me once I got my dual monitor setup working correctly.


Last edited by m2mg2 on 1 September 2020 at 9:39 pm UTC
Quoting: Patola
Quoting: Swiftpaw
Quoting: kokoko3kI just hope old gpu prices goes down, but it never happens.

They'd really prefer to price gouge you at all points in time, not just at release.

All that needs to be done is:

a) passing laws that force companies (...).

How about the complete opposite? Throw away all laws that currently pose an obstacle to competitors, don't force companies to anything. New players on the market will appear trying hard to get their niche, boom, prices drop. This is actually happening with VR sets right now.

Creating more laws against businesses does not make things better for the consumers. It onerates the entire production chain and makes it harder for everyone to get that. And it keeps competitors away for the big players. That's exactly what you don't want to happen.

That shows a basic incomprehension of economics and the fundamental tenets of Capitalism. And also a complete ignorance of history.

Free, unfettered Capitalism has already been tried. It ends in monopolies. "Competition" is an absolute meme, it's fundamental to any Capitalist system to prevent it becoming a hellscape, and yet the very nature of Capitalism dictates that every company should eliminate all competition. It's literally the profit motive. The fundamental, core, most important tenet of Capitalism. And the profit motive isn't "let's get enough profit to live comfortably," it's "always maximize profit."

Not a single economist or expert outside of discredited Austrian School lunatics actually believes what you're saying is even a thing.
Quoting: Patola
Quoting: slaapliedje
Quoting: Patola
Quoting: Swiftpaw
Quoting: kokoko3kI just hope old gpu prices goes down, but it never happens.

They'd really prefer to price gouge you at all points in time, not just at release.

All that needs to be done is:

a) passing laws that force companies (...).

How about the complete opposite? Throw away all laws that currently pose an obstacle to competitors, don't force companies to anything. New players on the market will appear trying hard to get their niche, boom, prices drop. This is actually happening with VR sets right now.

Creating more laws against businesses does not make things better for the consumers. It onerates the entire production chain and makes it harder for everyone to get that. And it keeps competitors away for the big players. That's exactly what you don't want to happen.
A big problem is that all the players in a market tend to end up being bought out by the larger players. That's basically just part of capitalism. (...)
And that happens because of the State -- specially laws and regulations --, not in spite of it. Big businesses do constantly skew the perception of the public to make it look like there is lack of regulations, and they win double by more and more obstacles which they are able to work with but not their smaller competitors. A freer market with no rules and thus no barrier against newcomers would be the best deterrent against monopolies. Sure, I understand there is a complex production chain, but these very same suppliers would benefit from more customers too, so it's not this chain that prevents competition. Conversely, it's hopeless to try and use the State against the big guys, they are best buddies and will use this whole perception to their profit.

This is objectively false. Big businesses don't "skew" anything, it is a natural, inherent aspect of all business to conglomerate, merge, acquire, etc. The idea of "an economy of small businesses and nothing else" is literally a myth and 100% impossible, minus some sort of regulation that limits the size of businesses. Even the small VR companies you talk about will be bought by Facebook or Microsoft or Apple or someone else if they become profitable enough, which is literally the entire goal. Again, it seems like you watched some bad documentaries or read some Ayn Rand and think you know what you're talking about, when you clearly have no idea.
x_wing 1 Sep
Quoting: slaapliedjeAnyhow, I'm wanting to know what the performance of DLSS and VR games are! I mean if we can get 100% solid frames at 144hz on the Index... that'd be hella-cool.

Is there a anyway to use DLSS on Linux (I mean, with games that support the feature)? The first 15 minutes of the video just felt a like a lot of Windows only features for me.

The only big new for me is the MSRP for the 3070 and the 3080. Somehow Nvidia decided to not keep rising them... hopefully this means that AMD has something hot on hands.
x_wing 1 Sep
Quoting: PatolaAnd that happens because of the State -- specially laws and regulations --, not in spite of it. Big businesses do constantly skew the perception of the public to make it look like there is lack of regulations, and they win double by more and more obstacles which they are able to work with but not their smaller competitors. A freer market with no rules and thus no barrier against newcomers would be the best deterrent against monopolies. Sure, I understand there is a complex production chain, but these very same suppliers would benefit from more customers too, so it's not this chain that prevents competition. Conversely, it's hopeless to try and use the State against the big guys, they are best buddies and will use this whole perception to their profit.

I fail to see which are the laws that prevents newcomers into the GPU market. IMO, the big wall is related with the dolar mountain you need to invest in order to become a new player.
Guerrilla 1 Sep
I find these prices (relative to the performance, using DF's video as a proxy) to simply be "okay." Some people are acting like this is an insanely good deal due to the alleged performance compared to previous generations - I personally thought those prices were way overpriced, so this is merely getting them down to more acceptable levels.

That being said, I'll still be waiting to see what Big Navi offers. I'd rather stick with AMD anyway, but if it's a flop, I'll be looking at the 3080 more seriously. My Fury is okay for the time being.
dude 1 Sep
  • Supporter
Sounds good. But, can they run Crysis?
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