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Cyberpunk 2077 confirmed for Stadia on November 19

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While the upcoming Cyberpunk 2077 will not support the Linux desktop, it is at least confirmed to be launching on Stadia same-day as other platforms on November 19.

This gives Linux gamers another way to play, with Stadia getting more huge upcoming games, as on Linux all you need is a Chromium browser and a mouse or gamepad hooked up. If your country is in the supported list for Stadia, that is. Google has still yet to announce wider support for the game streaming service.

Stadia getting probably one of, if not the biggest release this year day and date with other platforms with Cyberpunk 2077 is pretty huge news and perhaps a show of how serious Google are about bringing more people and more games over to it.

From the press release:

“Huge in scale and scope, Cyberpunk 2077 is our most ambitious game to date. It’s humbling to see just how many people are looking forward to playing it, and we want to make it possible for as many gamers as possible come November 19th, when the game launches. The Stadia version will allow players to jump into Night City just seconds after the game unlocks for play worldwide without any downloads needed,” said Michał Nowakowski, SVP of Business Development, CD PROJEKT.

"CD PROJEKT RED are known for developing some of the biggest and best games ever created, and Cyberpunk 2077 is sure to deliver as the most anticipated game of the last few years. We're thrilled to announce that Cyberpunk 2077 will be available on Stadia November 19th. Cyberpunk 2077 on Stadia will allow gamers to play on their favorite screens and never have to wait for a download or install to get into, and explore, the depths of Night City," said Shanna Preve, Managing Director, Stadia Partnerships.

Plenty more footage was shown off recently too on the official YouTube, like this one showing off plenty of the vehicles you will be able to get your hands on:

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They also confirmed that people who buy the game on Stadia will get a set of Cyberpunk 2077-themed digital goodies including: the game’s original score, art booklet, the original Cyberpunk 2020 sourcebook and Cyberpunk 2077: Your Voice comic book, as well as a set of wallpapers for desktop and mobile.

See Cyberpunk 2077 on Stadia.

It's worth noting also, that CD PROJEKT RED have been embroiled in plenty of controversy around Cyberpunk 2077. Video game journalist Jason Schreier has been covering it in detail, with a developer who was apparently confirmed to be working on it posting about the working conditions on Reddit too. Crunch is seriously terrible and it's such a massive shame these big games keep forcing such terrible conditions on developers. 


Don't miss that we're expecting more big Stadia news next week, which we will be following along.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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slaapliedje 22 Oct
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Quoting: Linuxwarper
Quoting: slaapliedjeRemember back in the days when the various computer platforms were around and companies still managed to release games for all of them? DOS, Amiga, Atari ST, Machintosh? They not only had a wide variety of hardware, but also of operating systems. People tended for some reason to target the minimal Atari ST spec, the upper spec on the Amiga, and DOS / Machintosh usually got CGA / EGA versions until VGA had a lot more users. But DOS devs had the huge task of trying to figure out which hardware was popular to add support for that. But they still did it, even though DOS was definitely not a gaming platform, and not friendly to it. But still a huge majority of games were made for it as that's what systems people had. Then the 3D hardware wars happened, where there were so many APIs for people to target...

It wasn't until Windows and DirectX that there was an abstraction layer for everything. We basically have SDL that is similar, but it took a long time for that to be a thing.

But now that we have it, and we have better drivers, and a free OS, you'd think people would flock to it. Nope, because we are historically a community that is against closed source, DRM, etc. And GAME developers are ALL about the DRM.

And this is the main reason I think most games don't come to Linux. That and 'well they won't even pay for their OS, why would they do anything other than pirate our game' mentality.
No, I got my first PC long time after those events. When it comes down to why games don't come to Linux it's simply because of marketshare. If marketshare was significant enough games would be developed with closed source and with Denuvo implemented into them just like with Windows.

Also it doesn't help the situation that industry has become in my opinion quite corrupt. We are at a point now where microtransactions are intertwined into a game's design and developers hold presentations titled "Let's go whaling" that explains how to maximize money siphoning from gamers using predatory practices. They don't treat Windows gamers right with these predatory practices, so I'd say it would be naive for one to think that these companies, who are releasing their games on Stadia, will be nice to us with a Linux release.

As much as I believe Stadia is a double edged sword, I believe it and primarily Proton, is chance Linux has to break free of the cage Microsoft continues to put platform in with DirectX.
No one in their right mind that uses Linux would allow some of the rootkits that companies have been shipping with their software. The thing is that most Linux users are savvy enough to have things in place to prevent such things. That's why companies don't bother with porting it over. But at least it seems most publishers have been removing that crap after a few months of sales. Seems Conan Exiles finally did and so now it works great in Proton.
Linuxwarper 22 Oct
Quoting: slaapliedjeNo one in their right mind that uses Linux would allow some of the rootkits that companies have been shipping with their software. The thing is that most Linux users are savvy enough to have things in place to prevent such things. That's why companies don't bother with porting it over. But at least it seems most publishers have been removing that crap after a few months of sales. Seems Conan Exiles finally did and so now it works great in Proton.
I don't have a issue against DRM that lasts six months to a year before it's removed. The anti cheat that's in Valorant I mind though. But it doesn't matter what I think, it will certainly not help with changing gaming on Linux. If marketshare grows, everyone can decide for themselves what software they object to. As long as Linux ecosystem isn't being harmed I don't care if people want to allow crap on their systems just so they can play a game. Alot people who don't use Linux don't care about FOSS principles but yet Linux needs them as users to change gaming landscape.


Last edited by Linuxwarper on 22 October 2020 at 9:03 pm UTC
drjoms 29 Oct
Quoting: mirv
Quoting: drjomstoo late but my 5 cents...
We should stop acknowledge Stadia's existence.
It's as much Linux gaming as some broadcasting of Playstation game on Android phone.

Would you prefer to stop acknowledging the Wine project as well then? After all, that's for running Windows software, and Windows gaming.

I wouldn't mind.
it was already covered here on gaming on Linux site, that some devs say that they think Proton is too good to make native port.

I think I have only one title in my collection of hundreds of games that is Proton. Wither 3.
drjoms 29 Oct
Quoting: Liam DaweFor people that don't like it, I urge you to just go and block the tag in your user settings. It's here, we're covering it, deal with it. Or, be like a reasonable adult and ignore what you don't like and are clearly not interested in. This constant back and forth is tiring.
I act like reasonable adult and voice my opinion. I am not telling you how to run the site. But I am not staying silent either. Thats what adults do. They have civil discussion/disagreement.
mirv 29 Oct
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Quoting: drjoms
Quoting: Liam DaweFor people that don't like it, I urge you to just go and block the tag in your user settings. It's here, we're covering it, deal with it. Or, be like a reasonable adult and ignore what you don't like and are clearly not interested in. This constant back and forth is tiring.
I act like reasonable adult and voice my opinion. I am not telling you how to run the site. But I am not staying silent either. Thats what adults do. They have civil discussion/disagreement.

There might be a miscommunication here - text is hard, and I'm not going to assume English is your first language, but coming on and saying that Stadia news should be ignored and that it's not "Linux" (GNU/Linux) is actually trying to say how the site should be run.

Especially when it's already been mentioned how it is a supported method of running games on a GNU/Linux desktop (and an Android Linux device too for that matter).

If you want a discussion, then might I suggest you give supporting evidence of your position?
mirv 29 Oct
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Quoting: drjoms
Quoting: mirv
Quoting: drjomstoo late but my 5 cents...
We should stop acknowledge Stadia's existence.
It's as much Linux gaming as some broadcasting of Playstation game on Android phone.

Would you prefer to stop acknowledging the Wine project as well then? After all, that's for running Windows software, and Windows gaming.

I wouldn't mind.
it was already covered here on gaming on Linux site, that some devs say that they think Proton is too good to make native port.

I think I have only one title in my collection of hundreds of games that is Proton. Wither 3.

Does it matter in the end how a game is run for you? I mean, ultimately, does it really matter how a (binary, closed source) game is run if it runs perfectly fine, and is supported? It's not like you have access to the code at all. Support is the key - and some game developers are supporting their game via "Proton" in Steam, or a wine wrapper in general (e.g System Shock).
drjoms 29 Oct
Quoting: mirvThere might be a miscommunication here - text is hard, and I'm not going to assume English is your first language, but coming on and saying that Stadia news should be ignored and that it's not "Linux" (GNU/Linux) is actually trying to say how the site should be run.

Especially when it's already been mentioned how it is a supported method of running games on a GNU/Linux desktop (and an Android Linux device too for that matter).

If you want a discussion, then might I suggest you give supporting evidence of your position?

I suggest, I don't 'TELL' them what to do. Telling someone what to do - assumes some kind of authority, which I don't have.

My position is simple. How supporting proprietary product, of software you don't own for a second, of a behemoth company, who is likely stops Linux ports from happening(I don't remember seeing one title that came out on stadia to be out on Linux) is helping Linux?

How is it ANY better than Microsoft?
How do you even know they use Linux?(because they said so? Boy oh boy I have a bridge to sell)

Following same rationale, Hugo, was Linux compatible 20-30 years ago! :D
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugo_(game_show)

And why do you call something Linux, when the code is not even executed on your Linux machine?
mirv 29 Oct
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Quoting: drjoms
Quoting: mirvThere might be a miscommunication here - text is hard, and I'm not going to assume English is your first language, but coming on and saying that Stadia news should be ignored and that it's not "Linux" (GNU/Linux) is actually trying to say how the site should be run.

Especially when it's already been mentioned how it is a supported method of running games on a GNU/Linux desktop (and an Android Linux device too for that matter).

If you want a discussion, then might I suggest you give supporting evidence of your position?

I suggest, I don't 'TELL' them what to do. Telling someone what to do - assumes some kind of authority, which I don't have.

My position is simple. How supporting proprietary product, of software you don't own for a second, of a behemoth company, who is likely stops Linux ports from happening(I don't remember seeing one title that came out on stadia to be out on Linux) is helping Linux?

How is it ANY better than Microsoft?
How do you even know they use Linux?(because they said so? Boy oh boy I have a bridge to sell)

Following same rationale, Hugo, was Linux compatible 20-30 years ago! :D
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hugo_(game_show)

And why do you call something Linux, when the code is not even executed on your Linux machine?

By your analogy, any tv that could show Hugo supports....showing Hugo. GNU/Linux is a supported platform for Stadia. It's helping you play games when booted into a GNU/Linux desktop.

Your snarky attitude does your arguments no favours. Google's servers run a variation of Debian. And it doesn't matter if they don't, because the end user is running a GNU/Linux desktop. So you can keep living under your bridge, no need to sell it

All input is from a GNU/Linux machine. All output is on a GNU/Linux machine. I would say almost by your reasoning, then....youtube isn't supported on GNU/Linux and everyone should abandon it.

Sigh, know what? I've had enough. You are being troll. I can do something about that for myself, blocked.
Dedale 30 Oct
I don't know if this is the best thread to mention this but i was watching a stream of Metro Exodus by Corben78. He was running the stadia version streamed on his Linux rig.

We were surprised at the end to see DXVK mentioned in the credits. So the stadia game isn't a full debian/VULKAN port after all.
mirv 30 Oct
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Quoting: DedaleI don't know if this is the best thread to mention this but i was watching a stream of Metro Exodus by Corben78. He was running the stadia version streamed on his Linux rig.

We were surprised at the end to see DXVK mentioned in the credits. So the stadia game isn't a full debian/VULKAN port after all.

It's highly likely that this is basically them tacking dxvk into their build as part of the porting process. If they have DX11 render paths and they can "just" (I'm sure it's not quite that easy) compile against DXVK....why not basically? So long as it gives them the performance they need. A good use of DXVK in my opinion, and maybe something even Microsoft are watching with interest.
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