Check out our Monthly Survey Page to see what our users are running.

Find programming relaxing? Enjoy puzzle games? Comet 64 could be your next game, with a theme and visuals inspired by some early computing devices.

"The year is 1984. All you've got is a Comet 64 home computer and the operator's manual it came with."

I probably don't have to tell our older readers what this is inspired by, with plenty having fond memories of the Commodore 64 and other classic computers. I actually started my gaming life on the later Amiga 600 by the same company quite a few years later!

Comet 64 developer Onur Ayas recently announced that it's going to officially release with Linux support on February 5, 2021 and they also showed it off in a brand new trailer:

YouTube Thumbnail
YouTube videos require cookies, you must accept their cookies to view. View cookie preferences.
Accept Cookies & Show   Direct Link

Features:

  • Read the documentation (exists both in-game, and as a pdf) and figure out how
    to operate this 80s computer.
  • Learn its assembly-like (but not quite) programming language.
  • Solve 50+ input - output processing puzzles.
  • Improve your solution and minimize your instruction and cycle counts to compete
    in the Leaderboards.
  • Solve bonus visual grid-based puzzles.
  • Discover secrets? of the machine.

You can follow Comet 64 on Steam.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
12 Likes, Who?
We do often include affiliate links to earn us some pennies. We are currently affiliated with GOG, Humble Store and Paradox Interactive. See more here.
About the author -
author picture
I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly.
See more from me
10 comments

seanbutnotheard 28 Dec, 2020
I'm sure the game is fun, but I'd also love to have a desktop environment that looks like this...
omer666 28 Dec, 2020
Quoting: seanbutnotheardI'm sure the game is fun, but I'd also love to have a desktop environment that looks like this...
You could do this with Awesome WM
tmtvl 28 Dec, 2020
Quoting: seanbutnotheardI'm sure the game is fun, but I'd also love to have a desktop environment that looks like this...

Isn't that what r/unixporn is all about? Making i3/bspwm/herbstluftwm look like... well, like a lot of things, but I have no doubt there's a bunch of retro-inspired setups. (Especially involving WindowMaker.)
Dedale 28 Dec, 2020
A C64 (Do you know what the "C" was supposed to stand for ?) had 16 colours, sprites and a little 3 channels synthesizer. That was why it was so fun. Maybe a simple book on how to make demos in assembler on a C64 emulator would be funnier. Or a game with puzzles running is such emulator. Not sure about copyright on the ROMs though.

That game sounds fun though but what i mean is in 1984, computers were already more capable than what this game suggest.

I'd love to have an Amiga 600. I lusted over a 500 for most of my teenage years.

Funny, the spellchecker seems to like US English and dislike the "colour" spelling.
aokami 28 Dec, 2020
This reminds me of TIS-100.
Same leaderboards design, coding on "old hardware" with documentation, puzzles with input expecting a specific output.
Looks nice!
tmtvl 28 Dec, 2020
Quoting: Dedale(Do you know what the "C" was supposed to stand for ?)

Admiral? ;-)

Fun fact: the C64 port of Ultima V had better graphics than the Apple II port, but lacked music; however the C128 port had both music and the improved graphics.

The C128 was also my first experience with backwards incompatibility, which was a fun lesson to learn.
Dedale 28 Dec, 2020
One of the few times the C128 had a use other than the C64 compatible mode.

It could use the still hot OS of the moment though: CP/M on a zilog Z80. It had also better resolution graphics but i never heard of anyone making use of it.

The "C" was first thought as Consumer. But the name "commodore 64" stuck very soon. There would be the C64 for the masses and the "P" (Personal) and "B"(Business) series of computers. The P and B ended up as disasters.

For the curious: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commodore_CBM-II
DrMcCoy 28 Dec, 2020
Btw, there's also http://silverspaceship.com/hovalaag/ . No native Linux version, but it works in Wine.
Dunc 28 Dec, 2020
Quoting: DedaleThat game sounds fun though but what i mean is in 1984, computers were already more capable than what this game suggest.
Yeah, the Amiga was only a year away, after all.

Quoting: DedaleThe "C" was first thought as Consumer. But the name "commodore 64" stuck very soon. There would be the C64 for the masses and the "P" (Personal) and "B"(Business) series of computers. The P and B ended up as disasters.
Wow. Every day's a school day. It's been nearly 40 years, and I never knew that. I mean, I knew of the P and B series, but never made the connection before. It makes perfect sense, of course.
F.Ultra 29 Dec, 2020
Quoting: DedaleThat game sounds fun though but what i mean is in 1984, computers were already more capable than what this game suggest.

Yes, the C64 even had GEOS (even though it didn't come out until 1986 it was still running on a c64 from 1982). I got a copy of GEOS for free back in the day as compensation for a faulty disk drive. And GEOS was way more advanced than the Comet64 from the trailer :)

https://www.c64-wiki.com/images/3/30/Geos20.png
While you're here, please consider supporting GamingOnLinux on:

Patreon, Liberapay or PayPal Donation.

We have no adverts, no paywalls, no timed exclusive articles. Just good, fresh content. Without your continued support, we simply could not continue!

You can find even more ways to support us on this dedicated page any time. If you already are, thank you!
Login / Register

Or login with...
Sign in with Steam Sign in with Twitter Sign in with Google
Social logins require cookies to stay logged in.

Livestreams & Videos
Community Livestreams
Latest Forum Posts