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The Linux distribution I was most thankful for in 2020 - EndeavourOS

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How do you know when someone uses Arch Linux? They will tell you. Welcome to an article telling you about how I use Arch Linux, well sort of anyway. It's a running joke in the Linux community and now one I am very much a part of.

Over the many years I've used Linux since discovering it properly about 17 years ago, I've seen many distributions rise and fall. With that in mind, I've obviously used quite a lot of different distributions. Like many people, early on in my Linux life I was a "distro hopper", someone who can't sit still and has to keep trying everything out. Moving between the likes of Mandrake (before it was Mandriva), Fedora Core (the original Fedora name), openSUSE and eventually feeling quite at home when discovering Ubuntu.

A long time later, i wanted to be a bit more bleeding-edge and have all the latest bells and whistles so I settled on Antergos. It was based upon Arch Linux but gave you a nice installer, which eventually died like many distributions before it. Manjaro was an option too, which I used for a while (two times, years apart) but I found it to be too unstable for my liking due to the way they bundle updates, and they've made a lot of…odd decisions lately that I felt pushed me away from them.

So what to do? I felt a bit stuck. Ubuntu was too safe, not particularly exciting and I didn't want another normal distro. I was told some tales of EndeavourOS, a fresh distribution that is the successor to Antergos. Giving an easy to use installer, with plenty of desktop environments to pick and unlike Manjaro, they are right up close to Arch Linux on the packaging with EndeavourOS sticking to Arch upstream but they have a few of their own extras. This was exactly what I wanted, Arch Linux but easy to install and get going.

Pictured above - EndeavourOS plus the MATE desktop. It's not fancy, and the MATE desktop isn't full of bling but that's why I like it. For the most part: it stays out of my way, it's highly configurable when I want it to be and it's easy to use.

Here's the thing. EndeavourOS is absolutely not something I will recommend to new users, or to even reasonably confident Linux users because for most I still recommend other distributions talked about in this previous article. Why? You really do have to setup a lot yourself, sometimes annoyingly so and there are problems at times with Arch being so fresh with packages.

The most annoying issue so far was a bug in the Arch packaging of libcairo, which caused the demo of APICO and all Paradox Interactive titles that used their launcher to fail to launch from Steam with the normal Steam Linux Runtime. The issues were reported (#1 - #2), then to the libcairo developers too (here) and in less than 24 hours the fix was committed. Part of why I love open source and Linux so much at times, because finding issues is often nothing more than running something in terminal to see and then you can go and report it and help get it fixed. Issues like that are why I never suggest people go and use the likes of Arch Linux (or anything based on it) since the updates continually roll in and breakages can and will happen but you find them before other distributions do so it all balances out. 

That said, EndeavourOS has actually been great. Surprisingly so too. It's now my /home on Linux and I continue to learn more about Linux every day when going a little out of my usual comfort zone with it.

If you're after something that's constantly up to date but easy to setup and you know what you're doing, EndeavourOS is the tip of the day.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly.
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scaine 6 Jan
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QuoteUbuntu was too safe, not particularly exciting and I didn't want another normal distro

Isn't this weird? I can really relate to it, but I don't really understand what drives it. It's the fundamental force behind distro-hopping I think.

I'm mostly settled on Mint, but there's still an itch that there might be something better out there. Certainly, Mint's biggest problem is the lack of an upgrade path. You basically have to re-install every two years, simple as that. Hardly ideal. But otherwise, it's amazing. So why am I constantly on the lookout for another distro...?
I also really love mint, but I did dabble in LMDE for a while to avoid the 2 year reinstall cycle, but I found that it wasn't really up to date enough for my needs, but it was pretty stable though and pretty lightweight in terms of resources.
I have used manjaro on other machines in the past so I might give EndeavourOS a whirl next time I need to do a fresh install.
theghost 6 Jan
I really liked and used Antergos a long time. I would really like to use EndeavorOS as successor but unfortunately they replaced the installer of Antergos with Calamares. But Calamares offers no option to encrypt your hard drive in combination with an unencrypted boot. The only two distributions which offer this are Ubuntu and Fedora. So I will stick with them.
Bumadar 6 Jan
I guess we been on linux for about the same amount of time, but funny enough i always sticked to opensuse as i felt it was the best kde distro, and yes i also reached the point where i felt it was boring, but right around that time tumbleweed started and i never looked back. At first it was tricky with an nvidia card but it gotten a bit easier once they gotten an nvidia repo for tumbleweed, i can only remember 2 issues with this rolling release, the bigest being when it took ages for nvidia to fix an issue with a new kernel. On new pc i went with an amd gfx card and the only other issue was one with vbox (need it for work). But overall its an amazingly stable rolling release wich is really close to new stuff.

Funny enough for work i now run a few ubuntu headless servers, still getting used to apt but am happy about things like systemd, in many ways it makes diffrent distro a lot closer together.
Pit 6 Jan
Quoting: theghostI really liked and used Antergos a long time. I would really like to use EndeavorOS as successor but unfortunately they replaced the installer of Antergos with Calamares. But Calamares offers no option to encrypt your hard drive in combination with an unencrypted boot. The only two distributions which offer this are Ubuntu and Fedora. So I will stick with them.
It's possible in openSUSE, too (with custom partitioning). And Tumbleweed is a really great choice if you are looking for a quite up-to-date but still rock-solid rolling release....

As for EndeavorOS - never heard of it So the article is greatly appreciated, I'll have a look at it at some point!
raneon 6 Jan
Quoting: theghostI really liked and used Antergos a long time. I would really like to use EndeavorOS as successor but unfortunately they replaced the installer of Antergos with Calamares. But Calamares offers no option to encrypt your hard drive in combination with an unencrypted boot. The only two distributions which offer this are Ubuntu and Fedora. So I will stick with them.

That was my issue with EndeavourOS as well when searching for a replacement for Antergos. Manjaro was not an option, because even on Antergos I did remove the Antergos adjustments right after installation to get a standard fully upgraded Arch Linux.
Basically I was told on a EndeavourOS bug report to program the Calamares adjustments by myself after requesting systemd-boot support. This was the point where I decided to use plain Arch Linux and to write my own bash scrips to install and setup Arch Linux. At least I learned something new :-)
Sometimes I look at other distributions like openSUSE and Fedora to get a highly integrated and tested system, but there is always something that holds me back. The openSUSE installation media still refuses to boot on some systems and Fedora up until the last release dis-encouraged Btrfs support.
fagnerln 6 Jan
Endeavour looks good, I hope that they succeed, and not finish like Antergos.

I tried Antergos two times, and in both, the installation failed, I don't know why. So I tried Manjaro for a few days, and in that time it was too much bloated. I know that it improved this way a lot, but every time that I consider to use it, I read some annoying thing about. Manjaro is a good project but with bad leadership, some weird choices. It reminds Mint, which is a project that now I despise, that Chromium controversy was the limit of acceptable, it cut off the snap from default (which is ok), blocked the snap installation (not ok) and don't give any alternative to chromium in that time.

So, nowadays I prefer to support more "root" distro. If I decide to use an Arch based system, I'll try to learn how to install Arch, it's a bit silly to use a derivation just because of the installation, I mean, the distro should add features to the base, like what Ubuntu did with Debian. The same for Ubuntu too, if I need to use it, I'll install it (or some flavor), not mint, zorin, pop...

Nowadays I'm on OpenSUSE TW, amazing distro with an amazing community, I'm using for months and never had any issue, it's really underrated. Maybe we need to shout more about it.
Quoting: BumadarI guess we been on linux for about the same amount of time, but funny enough i always sticked to opensuse as i felt it was the best kde distro, and yes i also reached the point where i felt it was boring, but right around that time tumbleweed started and i never looked back. At first it was tricky with an nvidia card but it gotten a bit easier once they gotten an nvidia repo for tumbleweed, i can only remember 2 issues with this rolling release, the bigest being when it took ages for nvidia to fix an issue with a new kernel. On new pc i went with an amd gfx card and the only other issue was one with vbox (need it for work). But overall its an amazingly stable rolling release wich is really close to new stuff.

Funny enough for work i now run a few ubuntu headless servers, still getting used to apt but am happy about things like systemd, in many ways it makes diffrent distro a lot closer together.

Is Tumbleweed not systemd based?

I was first encountered with Linux many, many years ago -25 if I recall correctly- but didn't really use it until 11 years ago or so. Since then, started with ubuntu, then quickly to Debian and stayed there for a long while because I didn't have new hardware and felt right at home with XFCE. Then new hardware came and my distro-hopping got pathologic lol. Stayed in Arch some months, Antergos, Anarchy, but Archa based weren't my cup of tea. Then to Ubuntu again, Pop_OS and some others like PureOS and Triskel -not for gaming, of course-. Then tried fedora and felt in love with it immediately. I guess, for GNOME users like me, it's the most adequate distro too.


Last edited by Arehandoro on 6 January 2021 at 12:13 pm UTC
Bumadar 6 Jan
Quoting: Arehandoro
Quoting: BumadarI guess we been on linux for about the same amount of time, but funny enough i always sticked to opensuse as i felt it was the best kde distro, and yes i also reached the point where i felt it was boring, but right around that time tumbleweed started and i never looked back. At first it was tricky with an nvidia card but it gotten a bit easier once they gotten an nvidia repo for tumbleweed, i can only remember 2 issues with this rolling release, the bigest being when it took ages for nvidia to fix an issue with a new kernel. On new pc i went with an amd gfx card and the only other issue was one with vbox (need it for work). But overall its an amazingly stable rolling release wich is really close to new stuff.

Funny enough for work i now run a few ubuntu headless servers, still getting used to apt but am happy about things like systemd, in many ways it makes diffrent distro a lot closer together.

Is Tumbleweed not systemd based?

Yes, sorry i was not clear, i meant that i found getting stuff working on a lower level (timers, services) was exacly the same now thanks to systemd, on a low level the distros are not tnat diffrent anymore compared to 10 years ago.
Quoting: Bumadar
Quoting: Arehandoro
Quoting: BumadarI guess we been on linux for about the same amount of time, but funny enough i always sticked to opensuse as i felt it was the best kde distro, and yes i also reached the point where i felt it was boring, but right around that time tumbleweed started and i never looked back. At first it was tricky with an nvidia card but it gotten a bit easier once they gotten an nvidia repo for tumbleweed, i can only remember 2 issues with this rolling release, the bigest being when it took ages for nvidia to fix an issue with a new kernel. On new pc i went with an amd gfx card and the only other issue was one with vbox (need it for work). But overall its an amazingly stable rolling release wich is really close to new stuff.

Funny enough for work i now run a few ubuntu headless servers, still getting used to apt but am happy about things like systemd, in many ways it makes diffrent distro a lot closer together.

Is Tumbleweed not systemd based?

Yes, sorry i was not clear, i meant that i found getting stuff working on a lower level (timers, services) was exacly the same now thanks to systemd, on a low level the distros are not tnat diffrent anymore compared to 10 years ago.

Yeah, that's actually pretty nice. There are still disparity with where files are located and package names, but that's easier to figure out :)


Last edited by Arehandoro on 6 January 2021 at 1:33 pm UTC
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