Support us on Patreon to keep GamingOnLinux alive. This ensures all of our main content remains free for everyone with no article paywalls. Just good, fresh content! Alternatively, you can donate through PayPal, Liberapay or Buy us a Coffee. You can also buy games using our partner links for GOG and Humble Store.

While Google hasn't seen the best news with Stadia lately after stopping first-party games and Terraria being cancelled, the store continues on with some fresh announcements of new games, updates and some sales.

Firstly, a quick look at the new games. For those subscribing to the optional Stadia Pro, the just released horror adventure Little Nightmares II is going to be another game you can claim free with the sub. Additionally, Pikuniku, the colourful and quirky platformer is now live to buy in the Stadia store.

Now Stadia also has another free to play game, as Crayta now has a Starter Edition available for everyone. Allowing anyone to jump in to create and play games, plus it has expanded with the Stadia Crowd Play Beta feature which allows people to jump right into the action if someone is streaming the game to YouTube:

YouTube Thumbnail
YouTube videos require cookies, you must accept their cookies to view. View cookie preferences.
Accept Cookies & Show   Direct Link

Crayta will also be heading to the Epic Store for the main Windows release, so no Linux desktop support - Stadia only. It will have cross-platform play and cross-progression so either way a nice boost in player numbers perhaps.

As for game updates PAC-MAN Mega Tunnel Battle got a new addon that gives new themes, special items, new player icons and character accessories. Destiny 2 also continues to be updated for Stadia with the Season of the Chosen now live but no word yet on the cross-play for it.

Something that has been asked a lot in the Stadia community is for FIFA to come, probably the biggest Football game around. Well, it's now confirmed. FIFA 21 arrives on Stadia on March 17.

Another thing that could be a boost is that Chromebooks now come with Stadia "already installed". Google's wording is a bit odd, since the whole point is you don't install anything. Really, it means it has a dedicated button to go to the website. Small thing but it might help considering how many Chromebooks there are.

There's also quite a few games on sale you can see on Stadia.com.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
6 Likes , Who?
We do often include affiliate links to earn us some pennies. We are currently affiliated with GOG and Humble Store. See more here.
About the author -
author picture
I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly.
See more from me
18 comments
Page: «2/2
  Go to:

slaapliedje 12 Feb
View PC info
  • Supporter Plus
Quoting: Liam DaweHardware is absolutely not here. Steam Machines were the only thing that came close, and they spectacularly failed. VCS does not count, as it's using a special brand and not normal Linux like SteamOS was.

And again, I don't subscribe to the thought that everything needs to "do us a favour" or contribute to Linux in some way. We are the only platform where this comes up. It's an option.
Ah, you're talking the difference between something you pluck off the shelf and can play on Linux with Steam/Lutris, vs I buy/build a box and put Linux on it and play.

Or would you consider System79 selling laptops/desktop systems with Linux pre-installed with Pop_OS good enough? The hardware is certainly here in that regard. Can you buy a system sitting next to the Playstation and Xbox? Nah. The VCS is going to be as close as we're going to get for a long time, unless Valve makes a second attempt at a Steam Machine, and for them to do it RIGHT is it will HAVE to come from Valve, not have multiple versions of it, and be a nice machine.

I think they should just make a deal with Atari and get Steam within the AtariOS and get more controller support added to the system. Hell, if the PC-Mode app would work correctly, and we could get a new SteamOS sold on a m.2 SSD or a pre-installed model option, it'd work well enough. Would just need another icon in Steam. A little Fuji on the supported systems, with any game that the system actually matches minimum requirements on.

So yeah while it's perfectly possible to build a system, or buy a system and properly do Linux gaming on it like I've done for many years, we don't have a settop box with Steam BPM (or RetroArch/Emulation Station) that you can buy just straight off the bat... oh actually there are some..

https://www.amazon.com/Fightstick-Trackball-Controller-Raspberry-Preloaded/dp/B08MFG7J1K

This has a Raspberry Pi loaded up with Linux and some Atari games. I didn't get this version as I already have several RPis and just wanted the arcade stick. But even the reviews on Youtube show that it's not an out of the box experience and you have to configure the stick for the emulators. Missed opportunity for a nice Turnkey solution.

I am just hoping somehow the AtariVCS will get some <-> Linux ports (meaning some that are on Steam for Linux will be released there, and some, like Ato will get a linux release as it's now already ported to the Atari VCS.)
mirv 12 Feb
View PC info
  • Supporter Plus
I know this is likely to result in a lot of enthusiastic typing, but why so much about wanting everything on Steam? There's a lot more out there, and having Valve control all your gaming isn't good for the GNU/Linux gaming ecosystem.

I'm not saying games on Steam would be bad (far from it), but I think it would be better to have multiple, competing stores, and a general non-reliance on any particular one.

Now if Google could get Stadia running well and supported on an RPi4 (ideally RPi3 and beyond), I think that would be much better. I actually don't really get why Google haven't done that yet, given the widespread use of the cheap and capable devices.
Mohandevir 12 Feb
Personnally I'd like to see some form of true Linux based AndroidTV-like OS that integrates all store fronts (Steam/EGS/GoG Galaxy/some form of Lutris/etc... into a 100% controller friendly/operated UI that could be the main OS for a new console.

But who could be willing to put efforts into such a device? If not Valve, who?

https://boilingsteam.com/drauger-os-developer-looking-to-make-console/

Still unconvinced.


Last edited by Mohandevir on 12 February 2021 at 5:58 pm UTC
slaapliedje 13 Feb
View PC info
  • Supporter Plus
Quoting: mirv
Quoting: Liam DaweAnd again, I don't subscribe to the thought that everything needs to "do us a favour" or contribute to Linux in some way. We are the only platform where this comes up. It's an option.

Be careful. This is the Internet, and you're being far too sensible. You're not supposed to be reasonable, sensible, and correct.

...but damn I'd like to link to your statement there in every Stadia thread. In neon. With UV-reactive paint. And a choir lining a red carpet. With dancers. Fire dancers.
Ha, I mean it's up to Liam on what he reports about.

To me, and only my opinion, reporting about Stadia gaming is sort of akin to reporting about Android gaming. They both use Linux somewhere in the stack, and in all actuality you could even play Android games on a Linux desktop easier than you can Stadia games (if you're anti-chrome). Then again I guess if you're anti-chrome you can't play with Geforce Now either. I haven't looked at Stadia's requirements, but Geforce Now doesn't even list Linux as supported at all, just says it works with Windows and MacOS, but it does work in Linux (tested it briefly on the AtariVCS, where I don't think it actually worked with the game pads, but did with keyboard / mouse).

I'll admit, I'm just bitter that things pop up on Stadia and not on desktop Linux, and it feels far too often that companies will take the flexibility and freedom and power of Linux, and then try as hard as they can to not give back. Which is kind of the whole spirit of the GPL. Does that make sense? To me it's the same thing as all those games where they are perfectly happy to make their server available to run on Linux systems, but refuse to port the client over so we can have an open operating system to enjoy the full game.
mirv 13 Feb
View PC info
  • Supporter Plus
Quoting: slaapliedje
Quoting: mirv
Quoting: Liam DaweAnd again, I don't subscribe to the thought that everything needs to "do us a favour" or contribute to Linux in some way. We are the only platform where this comes up. It's an option.

Be careful. This is the Internet, and you're being far too sensible. You're not supposed to be reasonable, sensible, and correct.

...but damn I'd like to link to your statement there in every Stadia thread. In neon. With UV-reactive paint. And a choir lining a red carpet. With dancers. Fire dancers.
Ha, I mean it's up to Liam on what he reports about.

To me, and only my opinion, reporting about Stadia gaming is sort of akin to reporting about Android gaming. They both use Linux somewhere in the stack, and in all actuality you could even play Android games on a Linux desktop easier than you can Stadia games (if you're anti-chrome). Then again I guess if you're anti-chrome you can't play with Geforce Now either. I haven't looked at Stadia's requirements, but Geforce Now doesn't even list Linux as supported at all, just says it works with Windows and MacOS, but it does work in Linux (tested it briefly on the AtariVCS, where I don't think it actually worked with the game pads, but did with keyboard / mouse).

I'll admit, I'm just bitter that things pop up on Stadia and not on desktop Linux, and it feels far too often that companies will take the flexibility and freedom and power of Linux, and then try as hard as they can to not give back. Which is kind of the whole spirit of the GPL. Does that make sense? To me it's the same thing as all those games where they are perfectly happy to make their server available to run on Linux systems, but refuse to port the client over so we can have an open operating system to enjoy the full game.

It's not really Stadia's (or Google's) responsibility to bring those games to GNU/Linux desktop though. Google does do a substantial amount of open source projects (not gone through the licenses to determine how "open", but that's an exercise for the reader, see here: https://opensource.google/projects/explore/featured) but it's simply not as visible on a desktop because that's not their business area.

I think what's happening is that Stadia is making it more apparent to the wider GNU/Linux desktop user base something that I've been saying for quite a long time: there's no technical reason stopping companies from releasing GNU/Linux versions of their games. Even id software never did that in an officially supported manner. Even though Doom 2016 needed to modify about 2 files to produce a fully working GNU/Linux version, Bethesda (or zenimax, or microsoft, or whoever owns it now) never bothered.
slaapliedje 13 Feb
View PC info
  • Supporter Plus
Quoting: mirv
Quoting: slaapliedje
Quoting: mirv
Quoting: Liam DaweAnd again, I don't subscribe to the thought that everything needs to "do us a favour" or contribute to Linux in some way. We are the only platform where this comes up. It's an option.

Be careful. This is the Internet, and you're being far too sensible. You're not supposed to be reasonable, sensible, and correct.

...but damn I'd like to link to your statement there in every Stadia thread. In neon. With UV-reactive paint. And a choir lining a red carpet. With dancers. Fire dancers.
Ha, I mean it's up to Liam on what he reports about.

To me, and only my opinion, reporting about Stadia gaming is sort of akin to reporting about Android gaming. They both use Linux somewhere in the stack, and in all actuality you could even play Android games on a Linux desktop easier than you can Stadia games (if you're anti-chrome). Then again I guess if you're anti-chrome you can't play with Geforce Now either. I haven't looked at Stadia's requirements, but Geforce Now doesn't even list Linux as supported at all, just says it works with Windows and MacOS, but it does work in Linux (tested it briefly on the AtariVCS, where I don't think it actually worked with the game pads, but did with keyboard / mouse).

I'll admit, I'm just bitter that things pop up on Stadia and not on desktop Linux, and it feels far too often that companies will take the flexibility and freedom and power of Linux, and then try as hard as they can to not give back. Which is kind of the whole spirit of the GPL. Does that make sense? To me it's the same thing as all those games where they are perfectly happy to make their server available to run on Linux systems, but refuse to port the client over so we can have an open operating system to enjoy the full game.

It's not really Stadia's (or Google's) responsibility to bring those games to GNU/Linux desktop though. Google does do a substantial amount of open source projects (not gone through the licenses to determine how "open", but that's an exercise for the reader, see here: https://opensource.google/projects/explore/featured) but it's simply not as visible on a desktop because that's not their business area.

I think what's happening is that Stadia is making it more apparent to the wider GNU/Linux desktop user base something that I've been saying for quite a long time: there's no technical reason stopping companies from releasing GNU/Linux versions of their games. Even id software never did that in an officially supported manner. Even though Doom 2016 needed to modify about 2 files to produce a fully working GNU/Linux version, Bethesda (or zenimax, or microsoft, or whoever owns it now) never bothered.
Yeah, I don't think it is their responsibility, that is on the developers of the game to do so. I just feel Stadia is another platform, unrelated to desktop Linux gaming, it is browser gaming.
But it feels like Stadia should / could be a stepping stone for developers to release their games on Desktop Linux, it is that this hasn't happened that I find annoying.


Last edited by slaapliedje on 13 February 2021 at 7:58 pm UTC
mirv 13 Feb
View PC info
  • Supporter Plus
Quoting: slaapliedje
Quoting: mirv
Quoting: slaapliedje
Quoting: mirv
Quoting: Liam DaweAnd again, I don't subscribe to the thought that everything needs to "do us a favour" or contribute to Linux in some way. We are the only platform where this comes up. It's an option.

Be careful. This is the Internet, and you're being far too sensible. You're not supposed to be reasonable, sensible, and correct.

...but damn I'd like to link to your statement there in every Stadia thread. In neon. With UV-reactive paint. And a choir lining a red carpet. With dancers. Fire dancers.
Ha, I mean it's up to Liam on what he reports about.

To me, and only my opinion, reporting about Stadia gaming is sort of akin to reporting about Android gaming. They both use Linux somewhere in the stack, and in all actuality you could even play Android games on a Linux desktop easier than you can Stadia games (if you're anti-chrome). Then again I guess if you're anti-chrome you can't play with Geforce Now either. I haven't looked at Stadia's requirements, but Geforce Now doesn't even list Linux as supported at all, just says it works with Windows and MacOS, but it does work in Linux (tested it briefly on the AtariVCS, where I don't think it actually worked with the game pads, but did with keyboard / mouse).

I'll admit, I'm just bitter that things pop up on Stadia and not on desktop Linux, and it feels far too often that companies will take the flexibility and freedom and power of Linux, and then try as hard as they can to not give back. Which is kind of the whole spirit of the GPL. Does that make sense? To me it's the same thing as all those games where they are perfectly happy to make their server available to run on Linux systems, but refuse to port the client over so we can have an open operating system to enjoy the full game.

It's not really Stadia's (or Google's) responsibility to bring those games to GNU/Linux desktop though. Google does do a substantial amount of open source projects (not gone through the licenses to determine how "open", but that's an exercise for the reader, see here: https://opensource.google/projects/explore/featured) but it's simply not as visible on a desktop because that's not their business area.

I think what's happening is that Stadia is making it more apparent to the wider GNU/Linux desktop user base something that I've been saying for quite a long time: there's no technical reason stopping companies from releasing GNU/Linux versions of their games. Even id software never did that in an officially supported manner. Even though Doom 2016 needed to modify about 2 files to produce a fully working GNU/Linux version, Bethesda (or zenimax, or microsoft, or whoever owns it now) never bothered.
Yeah, I don't think it is tgeir responsibility, that is on the developers of the game to do so. I just feel Stadia is another platform, unrelated to desktop Linux gaming, it is browser gaming.
But it feels like Stadia should / could be a stepping stone for developers to release their games on Desktop Linux, it is that this hasn't happened that I find annoying.

I'll admit to being disgruntled when these incredibly wealthy companies (and even more incredibly wealthy management) have everything in place, but don't even bother to test the waters. Then you see an indie dev with far less resources release something on multiple platforms, with far better finish, and more creative gameplay.

I'm not really buying the support costs for GNU/Linux being a thing anymore either. It's not like big budget games have a quality reputation on Windows these days, where it's probably just a crappy console port to begin with. They could probably divert a little marketing money to a GNU/Linux desktop version and they'd reap that back and more with all the free publicity from GNU/Linux users bubbling over general tech forums anyway.

(--edit: spelling)


Last edited by mirv on 13 February 2021 at 7:44 pm UTC
Linuxwarper 14 Feb
Quoting: mirvI'll admit to being disgruntled when these incredibly wealthy companies (and even more incredibly wealthy management) have everything in place, but don't even bother to test the waters. Then you see an indie dev with far less resources release something on multiple platforms, with far better finish, and more creative gameplay.
I can't say I care terribly about companies supporting Linux or not. It's always nice but I had no expectation of Google supporting the platform. I'm more concerned about what Stadia means for Linux and PC platform in general. Many people are going around thinking streaming is the future, when it's just a future. I could say alot more but I will end that subject with this; I've attempted now multiple times to install TWRP properly on my android phone. The first step before I can move on to install MicroG. Why? To degoogle my phone. I don't want to install LineageOS or E OS, I prefer the UI of the stock ROM. While I want choice and freedom to play games way I want and on platform I want we have Google and Microsoft. Recently I saw Microsoft social media account post a image of many consoles with caption "Don't be a fanboy!".

Quoting: mirvI'm not really buying the support costs for GNU/Linux being a thing anymore either. It's not like big budget games have a quality reputation on Windows these days, where it's probably just a crappy console port to begin with. They could probably divert a little marketing money to a GNU/Linux desktop version and they'd reap that back and more with all the free publicity from GNU/Linux users bubbling over general tech forums anyway.

(--edit: spelling)
I think they simply get more money from DLC and such for Windows than supporting Linux. These are money counting companies we are talking about, it's just beneficial for them that they have only Windows to target for PC. If Linux got 20% market share it would mean more work for them, at least initially til their workflow was standardized.


Last edited by Linuxwarper on 14 February 2021 at 4:15 pm UTC
While you're here, please consider supporting GamingOnLinux on:

Patreon, Liberapay or PayPal Donation.

We have no adverts, no paywalls, no timed exclusive articles. Just good, fresh content. Without your continued support, we simply could not continue!

You can find even more ways to support us on this dedicated page any time. If you already are, thank you!
Login / Register

Or login with...
Sign in with Steam Sign in with Twitter Sign in with Google
Social logins require cookies to stay logged in.

Livestreams & Videos
Community Livestreams