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Ready for one more attempt? Paradox Interactive and Paradox Tinto have announced he newest expansion to Paradox's flagship grand strategy game about the early modern world with Europa Universalis IV: Leviathan.

Leviathan offers new tools that allow you to play “tall” with smaller and more focused realms with a few centres of power. Paradox aren't yet giving away everything that's in it but they did say it also has a host of other changes to well-established game features like Regencies and Colonies. Additionally you will get new ways to quickly develop your capital, drawing resources and power from vassals or newly conquered territories, and allows you to build beyond your province's construction limit if you are willing to pay the price.

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As per usual, a big free update for everyone will be dropping at the same time as we've come to expect from anything Paradox do. This free update will rework  the Southeast Asian and Australasian maps, with new nations, new cultures and new religions offering up plenty of new ways to play through.

You can wishlist / follow Leviathan on Steam.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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6 comments

Massinissa 10 Feb
EU4 is so much more complex than other PAradox games (excluding Vic2), I don't even really understand it or how combat or trade works. I hope there were some detailed noob guide, I didn't find any.
eldaking 10 Feb
Quoting: MassinissaEU4 is so much more complex than other PAradox games (excluding Vic2), I don't even really understand it or how combat or trade works. I hope there were some detailed noob guide, I didn't find any.

I'm not sure, HoI4 has a bunch of obscure stuff too, and CK2 is not as complex but more counter-intuitive. But yeah, it is extremely complex.

How detailed you want the noob guide to be? If it is "over 45 hours of video", there is this one: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQFX9B_9L4-nsTuK1eDEOuBHKVoKc4cQN (you don't really need to watch to the end, though, and it is decently entertaining). It is a nice tutorial because it is a very experienced player, but he is teaching someone new to the game (but not totally clueless about games) as they go so it ends up being a better learning experience. Not 100% up to date, but more than good enough for most of the basic stuff.

But there are plenty of other guides, tutorials and gameplay videos around, it's more a matter of filtering than finding any.
Massinissa 10 Feb
Quoting: eldaking
Quoting: MassinissaEU4 is so much more complex than other PAradox games (excluding Vic2), I don't even really understand it or how combat or trade works. I hope there were some detailed noob guide, I didn't find any.

I'm not sure, HoI4 has a bunch of obscure stuff too, and CK2 is not as complex but more counter-intuitive. But yeah, it is extremely complex.

How detailed you want the noob guide to be? If it is "over 45 hours of video", there is this one: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQFX9B_9L4-nsTuK1eDEOuBHKVoKc4cQN (you don't really need to watch to the end, though, and it is decently entertaining). It is a nice tutorial because it is a very experienced player, but he is teaching someone new to the game (but not totally clueless about games) as they go so it ends up being a better learning experience. Not 100% up to date, but more than good enough for most of the basic stuff.

But there are plenty of other guides, tutorials and gameplay videos around, it's more a matter of filtering than finding any.

I find HOI4 way more simple than EU4. Like I did world conquest as anarchist spain as my first world conquest (I began the game at La Résistance DLC). And I did a Zoroastrian world conquest in CK2. But I can't manage to beat european Castilla as Granada, or resist colonization as Indonesia.

Thanks for the playlist :)
Quoting: MassinissaEU4 is so much more complex than other PAradox games (excluding Vic2), I don't even really understand it or how combat or trade works. I hope there were some detailed noob guide, I didn't find any.
I was roughly 40 hours in before I felt like I really had a handle on what I was doing, though it was also my first Paradox game so I had to learn everything from scratch instead of being able to extrapolate from other games like I could with CK II, Stellaris, and HoI IV.

My favorite feature so far is that the Pacific region is getting fleshed out with some new tags, including the traditional four kingdoms of the Hawaiian isles! And I've just realized that the stuff about ways to play a small, centralized realm could be really useful for these kinds of small tags, so that'll be interesting.
Massinissa 11 Feb
Quoting: Philadelphus
Quoting: MassinissaEU4 is so much more complex than other PAradox games (excluding Vic2), I don't even really understand it or how combat or trade works. I hope there were some detailed noob guide, I didn't find any.
I was roughly 40 hours in before I felt like I really had a handle on what I was doing, though it was also my first Paradox game so I had to learn everything from scratch instead of being able to extrapolate from other games like I could with CK II, Stellaris, and HoI IV.

My favorite feature so far is that the Pacific region is getting fleshed out with some new tags, including the traditional four kingdoms of the Hawaiian isles! And I've just realized that the stuff about ways to play a small, centralized realm could be really useful for these kinds of small tags, so that'll be interesting.

I mean, I understand that this building gives your more monthly taxes, that an army cost each per month, etc... But I don't get why when I export my CK2 game where all technology is in Persia, REnaissance starts in scrambled Spain while they were one or two centuries late in CK2 , I don't get yet how to micro/macro, and how to estimate when I can win or loose a battle.

But I really LOVE that you can play obscure nations you never heard about in school. I wish I was good enough to create a Samoan empire, dancing the Haka before the battle for Moscow :D


Last edited by Massinissa on 11 February 2021 at 1:34 pm UTC
Quoting: MassinissaI mean, I understand that this building gives your more monthly taxes, that an army cost each per month, etc... But I don't get why when I export my CK2 game where all technology is in Persia, REnaissance starts in scrambled Spain while they were one or two centuries late in CK2 , I don't get yet how to micro/macro, and how to estimate when I can win or loose a battle.

But I really LOVE that you can play obscure nations you never heard about in school. I wish I was good enough to create a Samoan empire, dancing the Haka before the battle for Moscow :D
Yeah, I can't speak for converter eccentricities. Figuring out winning battles can also be tricky, with the ratio of infantry:cavalry:artillery in each army, the military technology levels of the participating nations, any generals attached to armies, and the terrain all coming into play, but you get the hang of it eventually. (Larger numbers and a higher Tactics level are good first approximations!)

And yes! I've always loved maps and history, and when I first fired up EU IV I spent an hour just mousing around the map on the start screen, wondering at all the nations I'd never heard of in history books in various parts of the world. And there are so many more now, it's great.
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