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NVIDIA to launch DLSS support for Proton on Linux tomorrow (June 22)

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While DLSS has been technically available in the NVIDIA drivers for Linux for some time now, the missing piece was support for Proton which will be landing tomorrow - June 22.

In one of their GeForce blog posts, they made it very clear:

Today we’re announcing DLSS is coming to Facepunch Studios’ massively popular multiplayer survival game, Rust, on July 1st, and is available now in Necromunda: Hired Gun and Chernobylite. Tomorrow, with a Linux graphics driver update, we’ll also be adding support for Vulkan API DLSS games on Proton.

This was revealed originally on June 1 along with the GeForce RTX 3080 Ti and GeForce RTX 3070 Ti announcements. At least now we have a date for part of this extra support for Linux and DLSS. This, as stated, will be limited to games that natively use Vulkan as their graphics API which will be a short list including DOOM Eternal, No Man’s Sky, and Wolfenstein: Youngblood. Support for running Windows games that use DirectX with DLSS in Proton will arrive "this Fall".

With that in mind then, it's likely we'll see the 470 driver land tomorrow, that is unless NVIDIA have a smaller driver coming first with this added in. We're excited for the 470 driver as a whole, since that will include support for async reprojection to help VR on Linux and hardware accelerated GL and Vulkan rendering with Xwayland.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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x_wing 22 Jun
Quoting: CatKiller
Quoting: x_wingSo, the idea was to accelerate physics execution using the GPU but their reluctance to make a standard made them fail and 15 years after they first release of Physx we are still using the CPU.
No, the idea was that you'd buy a separate card just for accelerating physics calculations. But that was silly: no one was going to buy a card just for that, and no one was going to put support into their game for something that no one had. So Nvidia bought the company and made it so that you could run those calculations on the GPU that you already had. Then they open sourced it some time later.

IIRC, the first sample of Physx I saw was on 2005 and it was from the former company that created the tech, using dedicated hardware, which was in a very early stage (I'm almost sure that their dedicated solution never got to the market). In the moment that Nvidia bought that company, their strategy was to implement that solution into the GPU. So, Nvidia wanted to move physics calculation into GPU as use case of GPGPU. But they fucked up with that proprietary API that only became open source long after the hype was gone. That's my point.

Time will tell what will win. But I'm confident to say that Nvidia will fuck up once again.
CatKiller 22 Jun
Quoting: x_wingIIRC, the first sample of Physx I saw was on 2005 and it was from the former company that created the tech, using dedicated hardware, which was in a very early stage (I'm almost sure that their dedicated solution never got to the market).


The PPUs definitely existed. I doubt that many got sold, because the business case for them was rubbish, but you could get pre-built gaming machines with them in. The technology was also in a bunch of console games before Nvidia bought Ageia.

QuoteIn the moment that Nvidia bought that company, their strategy was to implement that solution into the GPU. So, Nvidia wanted to move physics calculation into GPU as use case of GPGPU.

Of course they did. Buying an extra PPU was silly, but GPGPU is great. And of course they wanted it to be a market differentiator to make back the purchase price, particularly as Intel had just bought Havok at the time.
slaapliedje 22 Jun
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Quoting: CatKiller
Quoting: x_wingIIRC, the first sample of Physx I saw was on 2005 and it was from the former company that created the tech, using dedicated hardware, which was in a very early stage (I'm almost sure that their dedicated solution never got to the market).


The PPUs definitely existed. I doubt that many got sold, because the business case for them was rubbish, but you could get pre-built gaming machines with them in. The technology was also in a bunch of console games before Nvidia bought Ageia.

QuoteIn the moment that Nvidia bought that company, their strategy was to implement that solution into the GPU. So, Nvidia wanted to move physics calculation into GPU as use case of GPGPU.

Of course they did. Buying an extra PPU was silly, but GPGPU is great. And of course they wanted it to be a market differentiator to make back the purchase price, particularly as Intel had just bought Havok at the time.
Yeah, the idea of offloading physics calculation to an extra GPU was awesome. Also not only a gaming feature, by the way. First game I remember utilizing it was Ghost Recon: Advanced Warfighter. Excellent game, but I think to this day one where PhysX won't work under wine :( That's one of those games that for the longest time, you couldn't play at max detail unless you had specific hardware, or it was SLOW...

Nvidia has done pretty well for themselves, considering they bought 3Dfx, and many other technologies as they went along. Sure their 'OMG, Ray Tracing!' was a little stupid for those of us that have known Ray Tracing has been a thing for decades, but it is still 'OMG realtime Ray Tracing!' which is actually rather phenomenal for consumer grade cards to be able to have such a feature.

People in the Linux community are interesting as there are some that are like 'Awesome, they support us with a driver that actually covers all of the features!' and then there are those that are 'OPEN SOURCE or GTFO!' I understand both, but for now I can't find an AMD graphics card, and I did finally find an nvidia one, and outside of Optimus shenanigans, I've never had any issues with nvidia's hardware / drivers.
Eike 23 Jun
Quoting: CatKillerThe PPUs definitely existed. I doubt that many got sold, because the business case for them was rubbish, but you could get pre-built gaming machines with them in. The technology was also in a bunch of console games before Nvidia bought Ageia.

I googled and found some... on Geocities. (So that's the age we're talking about. :D )

http://www.geocities.ws/nagaty_h/hardware/asus_physx_p1.htm


Last edited by Eike on 23 June 2021 at 9:02 am UTC
CatKiller 23 Jun
Quoting: Eike
Quoting: CatKillerThe PPUs definitely existed. I doubt that many got sold, because the business case for them was rubbish, but you could get pre-built gaming machines with them in. The technology was also in a bunch of console games before Nvidia bought Ageia.

I googled and found some... on Geocities. (So that's the age we're talking about. :D )

http://www.geocities.ws/nagaty_h/hardware/asus_physx_p1.htm
Well, not quite Geocities' heyday, but it was a while ago. It was the PS3 era, and MySpace was the world's biggest social network. AMD had a really terrible open source driver and a really terrible proprietary driver (I won't say the name in case it triggers flashbacks), and were selling off their fabs because they'd run out of money. Intel was switching to the Core architecture after the failures of Netburst and Itanium. YouTube was full of videos showing off Compiz, and Ubuntu had released a "Long Term Support" version called Dapper Drake.
slaapliedje 23 Jun
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Quoting: CatKiller
Quoting: Eike
Quoting: CatKillerThe PPUs definitely existed. I doubt that many got sold, because the business case for them was rubbish, but you could get pre-built gaming machines with them in. The technology was also in a bunch of console games before Nvidia bought Ageia.

I googled and found some... on Geocities. (So that's the age we're talking about. :D )

http://www.geocities.ws/nagaty_h/hardware/asus_physx_p1.htm
Well, not quite Geocities' heyday, but it was a while ago. It was the PS3 era, and MySpace was the world's biggest social network. AMD had a really terrible open source driver and a really terrible proprietary driver (I won't say the name in case it triggers flashbacks), and were selling off their fabs because they'd run out of money. Intel was switching to the Core architecture after the failures of Netburst and Itanium. YouTube was full of videos showing off Compiz, and Ubuntu had released a "Long Term Support" version called Dapper Drake.
There are some dedicated PhysX cards on eBay. Weirdly PCIe, my memory through the years would have insisted that they were PCI!
https://www.ebay.com/itm/362488709628?hash=item546602c1fc:g:io4AAOSw8R9b7tcM
CatKiller 23 Jun
Quoting: slaapliedjeThere are some dedicated PhysX cards on eBay. Weirdly PCIe, my memory through the years would have insisted that they were PCI!
I think the early Ageia ones were PCI. I also seem to recall some cards having PCI connections on one side and PCIe connections on the other. Ah, technology transitional periods. No AGP ones, though, because that would be taken up by your graphics card.
slaapliedje 23 Jun
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Quoting: CatKiller
Quoting: slaapliedjeThere are some dedicated PhysX cards on eBay. Weirdly PCIe, my memory through the years would have insisted that they were PCI!
I think the early Ageia ones were PCI. I also seem to recall some cards having PCI connections on one side and PCIe connections on the other. Ah, technology transitional periods. No AGP ones, though, because that would be taken up by your graphics card.
Ha, seems ebay has some odd looking add-on boards as well, that I didn't remember being a thing.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/133097830422?hash=item1efd3fb816:g:TlUAAOSwbyVdFnfd

I kind of hate that most motherboards have completely dropped PCI support. I still have a decent amount of PCI cards that are good enough backups for some purposes (like my very first video card, the Matrox Millennium II).
CatKiller 23 Jun
Quoting: slaapliedjeI kind of hate that most motherboards have completely dropped PCI support. I still have a decent amount of PCI cards that are good enough backups for some purposes (like my very first video card, the Matrox Millennium II).

RIP my M-Audio Audiophile 2496.
posthum4n 24 Jun
Quoting: SpykerI can't wait to retest some titles that was struggling in VR (No man sky) and see if it's finally playable with async reprojection :)

I think you'll have to wait for the 470 driver!

https://forums.developer.nvidia.com/t/support-for-async-reprojection/123382/31
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