Support us on Patreon to keep GamingOnLinux alive. This ensures all of our main content remains free for everyone with no article paywalls. Just good, fresh content! Alternatively, you can donate through PayPal, Liberapay or Buy us a Coffee. You can also buy games using our partner links for GOG and Humble Store.

Turnip Boy Commits Tax Evasion has dropped Linux support (updated)

By - | Views: 15,674

Update: 28/08/21 - The developer is now looking into putting up a Beta version to get the community to help test. So it's possible they may restore native Linux support.


Original article:

Turnip Boy Commits Tax Evasion, a silly single-player adventure that reviewed well and one I personally enjoyed has decided to drop Linux support.

Snoozy Kazoo and Graffiti Games recently put out a big free update for the game, which is not coming to Linux. On their Steam forum, the developer posted this announcement on August 19:

Attention gamers and tax evaders,

We will be dropping support for Linux beyond the June 16th release of the game on Linux. If you have the Linux version installed, it will not be updated with future content and fixes unfortunately. You will need to download the Windows or Mac version for future updates.

We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause, but it has been a struggle to reliably build and test the Linux version, so it will not be updated in the future.

No further explanation was given on what issues they encountered. It's built with the Unity game engine, which usually has pretty good Linux support so we can only speculate as to anything more on it until they decided to expand on the reasons for it.

A real shame when this happens but it's part of the struggle of being a niche platform. Hopefully the upcoming Steam Deck (which is powered by Linux) will eventually see more developers look to support their games directly either through native builds they have control over, or regular testing with Steam Play Proton.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
11 Likes
We do often include affiliate links to earn us some pennies. We are currently affiliated with GOG and Humble Store. See more here.
About the author -
author picture
I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly.
See more from me
49 comments
Page: 1/5»
  Go to:

Cybolic 27 Aug
Oh, I was meaning to pick that up, guess I won't have to now.
TheSHEEEP 27 Aug
View PC info
  • Supporter Plus
Honestly just shows what I've been saying for years:

Game developers suck at software development, despite doing exactly that - usually they only don't if they themselves come from "normal" software development and possess more skills than "how to do X in Unity".
It's the natural conclusion to having too-convenient tools like Unity available, I guess.

"struggle to reliably build and test".... wow, just wow.
Stuff like that wouldn't fly where I work.


Last edited by TheSHEEEP on 27 August 2021 at 10:39 am UTC
starfarer 27 Aug
Quoting: TheSHEEEPHonestly just shows what I've been saying for years:

Game developers suck at software development, despite doing exactly that - usually they only don't if they themselves come from "normal" software development and possess more skills than "how to do X in Unity".
It's the natural conclusion to having too-convenient tools like Unity available, I guess.

"struggle to reliably build and test".... wow, just wow.
Stuff like that wouldn't fly where I work.

Yeah, that's what I was thinking. This smells like laziness or incompetence. Or both. If I told my employer something like that he'd tell me to for a new job.

I'm terrible at programming myself but I don't understand how you could fail at setting up a testing environment.
M@GOid 27 Aug
I hope they at least have the decency to give refunds for those who bought their game in good faith. But I wouldn't hold my breath...
CatKiller 27 Aug
Since developers like this suck so much at customer service, Valve should force them to do better: give automatic refunds to affected customers, to make them whole, and withhold revenue until the cost of that has been recovered. That's what other retailers do. I'm only ever going to buy a handful of games from any particular game dev, but I buy hundreds overall from Steam; my confidence in buying things on Steam becomes less every time a developer pulls this kind of scam, which harms Valve.


Last edited by CatKiller on 27 August 2021 at 12:17 pm UTC
Hori 27 Aug
There should be a warning that Steam gives you when you launch games that are no longer supported...

What if someone who plays this on Linux doesn't find out about this, and doesn't get to enjoy the new updates?
You can always switch to using Proton for it, sure, but that's only if you know that you should do that.

Who knows how many games are there in my library for which I should be using Proton instead of the native port... I sure don't, I only know of a couple.

They already give you warnings when you launch something with Proton, and I think the same should apply the other way around when the port is unsupported.

The way it works right now is basically a trap, one that's very easy to fall into :| There's too many games that dropped support. You can't possibly know them all, especially if the dropped happened way before you purchased it.
It's bad user service since Linux users have to do extra research for each purchase... and if it's going to be the same on the Deck, then that's really bad.

In contrast, on platforms such as a PlayStation, you know for sure that if you buy something it works. Your research there is only in regards to whether you'd enjoy that game or not, without having to worry about any technical stuff (which most users don't understand anyway, nor should they have to if they're not into it / enthusiasts)
Even on Windows it's a pretty safe bet that it's going to work (tho not guaranteed).


Last edited by Hori on 27 August 2021 at 12:19 pm UTC
ShabbyX 27 Aug
Quoting: TheSHEEEPGame developers suck at software development, despite doing exactly that

Well the majority of "game developers" are actually just artists. One-man-army game devs are artists who can code a little.

Even a good majority of professional developers suck at programming (sorry, but that's the truth), can't really expect much from artists.
Hori 27 Aug
Quoting: TheSHEEEPHonestly just shows what I've been saying for years:

Game developers suck at software development, despite doing exactly that - usually they only don't if they themselves come from "normal" software development and possess more skills than "how to do X in Unity".
It's the natural conclusion to having too-convenient tools like Unity available, I guess.

"struggle to reliably build and test".... wow, just wow.
Stuff like that wouldn't fly where I work.
It's up to them to decide whether the effort and money they put into it is worth it or not. Because for sure it ain't free.

If they consider it's not profitable, or that they could do something else with that time/effort that's more profitable than it, then it is what it is, that's capitalism, we can't demand charity.
Even if it was a poor choice, it's still their to make, it's their product.

Although I do agree that it paints them as lazy... they did after all start something and didn't see it through because it's too "hard". IMO when you start something you should also finish it, and not just give up, otherwise, just not start it at all and save the disappointment and false expectations.


Last edited by Hori on 27 August 2021 at 12:30 pm UTC
Romlok 27 Aug
I notice that the game is still being "recommended" by the GamingOnLinux curator in Steam. Maybe it's time to revisit that?

Quoting: HoriIf they consider it's not profitable, or that they could do something else with that time/effort that's more profitable than it, then it is what it is, that's capitalism, we can't demand charity.
It's not charity if it's a product that's already been sold. We're in the realm of legal obligations and customer expectations now.

I think there's two positions one could take on this:

1. "You paid for the game at the time, you got the game at the time"
2. "You paid for the game like everyone else, you should expect to receive the same product/experience as everyone else"

While I personally lean more toward the sentiment of #2, for a single-player game I think #1 can be a reasonable position to hold. So long as the game doesn't lose functionality for those who bought it on Linux, they essentially still have what they paid for. :/
redneckdrow 27 Aug
First Forager, now this. What luck I have, I tell you...

A struggle to build and test? Build and test it on Linux for Pete's sake! Unity's editor works fine now on Linux last I checked; what a cop-out response! If it's a middleware problem, just say so, don't blame the Kernel/OS for someone else's failing.

If itch supported reviews, I'd tell them what I think just like I did with Forager!
While you're here, please consider supporting GamingOnLinux on:

Patreon, Liberapay or PayPal Donation.

This ensures all of our main content remains totally free for everyone with no article paywalls. We also don't have tons of adverts, there's also no tracking and we respect your privacy. Just good, fresh content. Without your continued support, we simply could not continue!

You can find even more ways to support us on this dedicated page any time. If you already are, thank you!
Login / Register

Or login with...
Sign in with Steam Sign in with Twitter Sign in with Google
Social logins require cookies to stay logged in.

Livestreams & Videos
Community Livestreams
Latest Forum Posts