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Fan game Sonic Robo Blast 2 gets a new tutorial, various improvements

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Are you a Sonic fan and love checking out fan games? What about a 3D game made with the Doom Legacy port of Doom? Sonic Robo Blast 2 is a quality addition to the collection that's quite unique. It's not just another 2D platformer like the classics, instead attempts to be a full 3D recreation.

You control movement with WASD and spacebar to jump, with camera being moved with either mouse or arrows. It's genuinely good and available free. As someone who grew up with Sonic, I appreciate this. Hopefully you will enjoy it too.

Here's what's new in version 2.2.10:

  • The file limit has been massively increased. (The skin limit is still 32, though!)
  • The tutorial has been redone for the new default controls.
  • Many new additions to Lua, including bot features, an improved input library, easing functions and more.
  • Blending modes for midtextures and FOFs.
  • Multi-tagging and more convenient slope copying for non-UDMF maps.
  • Generalized slopes for UDMF maps.
  • The ability to load folders for easier addon development. No need to compile your resources into a PK3 until you’re ready to release your work!
  • A couple of updated graphics, textures & sprites.
  • Way too many bug fixes to list here.

You can download it for Linux from Flathub.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly.
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5 comments

Kithop 8 Mar
I've come back and played this off and on over the years - they started in 1998 on this(!) and are still going, which in and of itself is some kind of testament to... something.

No, seriously - genuinely impressed with the commitment to it, and yeah, it can feel a little weird at first, coming from other Sonic games, but remember - Sonic Adventure only came out at the tail end of 1998 in Japan. Here in North America, of course, we had the 9/9/99 launch date instead (I still have the Dreamcast pre-order T-shirt and goodies from Electronics Botique, now GameStop).

If Sonic Adventure was the herald for future mainline 3D Sonic games, SRB2 feels much more firmly rooted in the 'what if we just took Genesis (MegaDrive)-era 2D Sonic and made it 3D?' that even Sega / Sonic Team kind of went back to later, theme-wise, with stuff like Sonic Generations and Sonic 4. (Nevermind Sonic Mania being an amazing love-letter to that 2D world, of course)

Anyone who has fond memories of 90s Sonic and wondered what an alternate universe where Sonic Team didn't... do whatever they did in the transition to 3D, should really check this out, especially now that it's had 20+ years of polish. :)
Anyone try it on a Steam Deck yet?
ST34MF0X 8 Mar
The game is better played once bound to joypad using the settings menu. Should be fun to play on Deck.
This game is good, but I feel the devs are torturing themselves at this point by continuing to use the doom engine. There's so much impractical hacking to make this thing work it would be much much simpler at this point to switch to a proper open source 3d engine like Darkplaces or even Q3. For instance, the game still doesn't have working loops because the engine's (lack of) physics do not support them at all. It's also permanently capped on 35 FPS because of similar reasons.
Calinou 10 Mar
Quoting: HythlodaeusThis game is good, but I feel the devs are torturing themselves at this point by continuing to use the doom engine. There's so much impractical hacking to make this thing work it would be much much simpler at this point to switch to a proper open source 3d engine like Darkplaces or even Q3. For instance, the game still doesn't have working loops because the engine's (lack of) physics do not support them at all. It's also permanently capped on 35 FPS because of similar reasons.

Doom source ports generally have more complete modding documentation than Quake source ports do.

Also, uncapping the framerate would be possible if Doom Legacy supported physics step interpolation (like GZDoom and PrBoom+ do).
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