You can sign up to get a daily email of our articles, see the Mailing List page.
We do often include affiliate links to earn us some pennies. See more here.

BeamNG.drive gets experimental Native Linux support

By - | Views: 18,999

With the new 0.25 release of BeamNG.drive, the developers have now put up an experimental Native Linux version for you to try and give feedback.

What is it? BeamNG.drive is a driving sim based on realism. They have spent a long time on their sim, along with their soft-body physics engine simulating all parts of their vehicles in real-time that they say results in "true-to-life behavior". It's a huge game on Steam, with an Overwhelmingly Positive review score from over 100,000 users.

From the release announcement:

With the release of 0.25 we are including EXPERIMENTAL support for BeamNG Linux. We know that this is something a number of you have wanted for some time, and it seems the time has come to give our players the chance to experiment with this.

Since this is an experimental work in progress product, we do not offer customer support for BeamNG on Linux. This product may be buggy, crashy, unstable or all of the above, but if you are a Linux enthusiast we encourage you to try it out.

Your feedback will be invaluable in helping us get a properly supported version of BeamNG for Linux. In case of questions, please make use of this thread, but make sure to read the guidelines first.

YouTube Thumbnail
YouTube videos require cookies, you must accept their cookies to view. View cookie preferences.
Accept Cookies & Show   Direct Link
Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
25 Likes
About the author -
author picture
I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly.
See more from me
17 comments
Page: «2/2
  Go to:

Beamboom 22 Jun
Quoting: slaapliedjeBut then you get into the conundrum of which version of Proton?

Theoretically, yes.
But then we are back to probability. The probability of a game working on the latest version (if working on Proton at all) is very high. Just like the probability of a native game running as good or better on Proton is very high. And vice versa, if a game doesn't work on the latest version it probably won't work on earlier versions either.

Simply put I play exclusively on Proton, so I have some mileage on it. And it's been quite a while since I had to choose an earlier version to run a specific game. It's happened, yes, but it's one or two titles and maybe two years ago - maybe even longer.
And, come to think of it, then it's always been to go from experimental to latest stable.

Bu that's just my experience. That's not to say it won't or doesn't happen anymore. I'm sure it will. An extra layer does add complexity.
It's just that statistically speaking Proton works bloody well, and increasingly so for each month.


Last edited by Beamboom on 22 June 2022 at 7:32 am UTC
Quoting: Beamboom
Quoting: slaapliedjeBut then you get into the conundrum of which version of Proton?

Theoretically, yes.
But then we are back to probability. The probability of a game working on the latest version (if working on Proton at all) is very high. Just like the probability of a native game running as good or better on Proton is very high. And vice versa, if a game doesn't work on the latest version it probably won't work on earlier versions either.

Simply put I play exclusively on Proton, so I have some mileage on it. And it's been quite a while since I had to choose an earlier version to run a specific game. It's happened, yes, but it's one or two titles and maybe two years ago - maybe even longer.
And, come to think of it, then it's always been to go from experimental to latest stable.

Bu that's just my experience. That's not to say it won't or doesn't happen anymore. I'm sure it will. An extra layer does add complexity.
It's just that statistically speaking Proton works bloody well, and increasingly so for each month.
As a counterpoint I'd like to note that I first got a game working on Proton two days ago, but in all my time of playing native titles the only ones I've found to not work any more are my old Loki games. And at that I've had some luck getting Alpha Centauri working, although it takes some fiddling around.
Mind you, it may be that some of the games I've played in the past would be problematic now and I just haven't tried them lately. Still, my experience hasn't involved a lot of this "native games going bad" thing that I hear a lot about.
slaapliedje 22 Jun
View PC info
  • Supporter Plus
Quoting: Purple Library Guy
Quoting: Beamboom
Quoting: slaapliedjeBut then you get into the conundrum of which version of Proton?

Theoretically, yes.
But then we are back to probability. The probability of a game working on the latest version (if working on Proton at all) is very high. Just like the probability of a native game running as good or better on Proton is very high. And vice versa, if a game doesn't work on the latest version it probably won't work on earlier versions either.

Simply put I play exclusively on Proton, so I have some mileage on it. And it's been quite a while since I had to choose an earlier version to run a specific game. It's happened, yes, but it's one or two titles and maybe two years ago - maybe even longer.
And, come to think of it, then it's always been to go from experimental to latest stable.

Bu that's just my experience. That's not to say it won't or doesn't happen anymore. I'm sure it will. An extra layer does add complexity.
It's just that statistically speaking Proton works bloody well, and increasingly so for each month.
As a counterpoint I'd like to note that I first got a game working on Proton two days ago, but in all my time of playing native titles the only ones I've found to not work any more are my old Loki games. And at that I've had some luck getting Alpha Centauri working, although it takes some fiddling around.
Mind you, it may be that some of the games I've played in the past would be problematic now and I just haven't tried them lately. Still, my experience hasn't involved a lot of this "native games going bad" thing that I hear a lot about.

Last time I tried, I managed to get Heavy Gear II to work, and it was just a few years ago. I should try again. But usually it isn't terribly difficult to get such things to work in Linux.
Beamboom 22 Jun
Quoting: Purple Library GuyAs a counterpoint I'd like to note that I first got a game working on Proton two days ago, but in all my time of playing native titles the only ones I've found to not work any more are my old Loki games.

But are you now talking about "real" native binaries, source code fully written to be compiled on Linux, or do you talk about the "ports" (Feral & co)? Because that's a major difference.

I totally believe that "proper" native games runs well as long as the libraries they depend on are available/compatible with your system setup. It should, really.

But I primarily speak about the "ports" we usually find on Steam (I struggle even calling it that) that's based on using libraries that's equivalents of Wine, typically the bigger games. Those have turned out to often run better (better performance) through Proton. Some even technically better (less audio issues etc).

But there are even examples of games made on Unity that has turned out to actually run better through Proton. That's almost tragic :D

But I mean, sure, a lot of native games do run well, especially the smaller/less complex ones. But the million dollar question is: Do they run BETTER than via Proton.
That's the real question. Because if not, there's really no technical reason for Valve to make it more complicated than necessary.


Last edited by Beamboom on 23 June 2022 at 7:26 pm UTC
Quoting: Beamboom
Quoting: Purple Library GuyAs a counterpoint I'd like to note that I first got a game working on Proton two days ago, but in all my time of playing native titles the only ones I've found to not work any more are my old Loki games.

But are you now talking about "real" native binaries, source code fully written to be compiled on Linux, or do you talk about the "ports" (Feral & co)? Because that's a major difference.

I totally believe that "proper" native games runs well as long as the libraries they depend on are available/compatible with your system setup. It should, really.

But I primarily speak about the "ports" we usually find on Steam (I struggle even calling it that) that's based on using libraries that's equivalents of Wine, typically the bigger games.
Not sure. But most of my games are indies, or Paradox. So maybe my stuff just skews to more genuine nativeness.
slaapliedje 22 Jun
View PC info
  • Supporter Plus
Some of it is even down to what drivers you use. While AMD drivers are out there in the kernel, I have had less issues with my nvidia setup than I have read others complain about with native versions.

There were quite a few releases that specifically stated there were issues with D GPUs. So that is definitely a factor here. The Deck using AMD hardware may be the main reason they favor Proton over native builds. But I can only report on the things I have tried, and so far running Proton bs Native has for sure caused me mkre issues than not on the Deck.
Beamboom 23 Jun
Quoting: slaapliedjeSome of it is even down to what drivers you use. While AMD drivers are out there in the kernel, I have had less issues with my nvidia setup than I have read others complain about with native versions.
That is actually a very good point. Another factor to consider in this picture.
While you're here, please consider supporting GamingOnLinux on:

Reward Tiers: Patreon. Plain Donations: PayPal.

This ensures all of our main content remains totally free for everyone with no article paywalls. We also don't have tons of adverts, there's also no tracking and we respect your privacy. Just good, fresh content. Without your continued support, we simply could not continue!

You can find even more ways to support us on this dedicated page any time. If you already are, thank you!
Login / Register

Or login with...
Sign in with Steam Sign in with Twitter Sign in with Google
Social logins require cookies to stay logged in.