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Prodeus, the crowdfunded first-person shooter that blends together new and old design styles, will no longer be doing a Native Linux version and instead will ensure it works nicely with Proton.

The team at Bounding Box Software had been quiet for some time on their plans here, seemingly ignoring all questions about Linux for many months so it's good to finally get a proper answer. Still, for those of you still sticking to only Native Linux games, this probably stings a little.

Here's what they said:

We are making sure the game runs on Proton and will be doing a pass at reaching full green status on the Steam Deck once the game is fully out. Unfortunately, we won't be able to make a Native Linux build, there were far too many issues and we couldn't get it to run properly. The Proton version of the game has a much smoother experience and the tests on Steam Deck showed great promise. We apologize for any inconvenience this might cause.

Update: in their Discord, a developer added this clarification:

A little clarification on the Linux News. Right now the Unity tool chain for making native Linux builds is still experimental. While they say you can do it, it does not work all that well and, as stated above, there are graphical errors and various other issues that make the game unplayable. A Linux build may still be a possibility in the future but at this time it is on hold until Unity's Linux tool chain is in a better state and we have the resources to dedicate to figuring it out properly.

It does in fact already run extremely well with the Proton compatibility layer both on Linux desktop and Steam Deck, take a look at one of my earlier videos of it on Deck below:

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Prodeus is set to be released at some point soon it seems, with a release date announcement due to be revealed at the upcoming Realms Deep 2022 that will take place from Friday - Sunday, September 16-18 2022.

Available to buy on Humble Store and Steam.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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BloodScourge Sep 6, 2022
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Yeah... Refund time
benjamimgois Sep 6, 2022
Honestly, i think the developer is right. Native builds are hard to maintain, easy to break after some time and fragment development and multiplayer base. Focus on a great proton experience is the best route.
coeseta Sep 6, 2022
Quoting: elmapulif linux had an stable api/abi that would be a problem.
but linux dont have one, every time someone say: "we have retrocompatibility now! its a solved problem" a few months pass and something break again.

then we hear this promisse again.
if we cant ensure that apps writen 5 years ago run fine we can be sure that what we write today wont run in 5 years.

its much easier to target windows then let wine/proton deal with keeping this api/abi compatible to whatever new api/abi linux currently have, you solve the problem once for everyone.

Just for the fun of it I just tried to run UT 2004 that i installed 2010 on my system. I reinstalled the OS several times and even swapped hardware and it still runs out of the box when i start it. Same with other old linux games.

That being said I know Unity has issues but if devs would start to develope games properly from the start it would just run for decades with great performance and compatibility that windows could just dream of.
dos Sep 6, 2022
Quoting: dziadulewiczHow can this be? Why is it this way all the way nowadays? The game runs better on the get go via assets and tech made for Windows rather than what is meant for Linux?

Incompetence. For me personally, making a game that runs well on Windows via WSLg would be easier than providing a native Windows build too. I learned how to deal with Windows anyway, while they obviously don't care enough.
BlooAlien Sep 6, 2022
Quoting: coeseta
Quoting: elmapulif linux had an stable api/abi that would be a problem.
but linux dont have one, every time someone say: "we have retrocompatibility now! its a solved problem" a few months pass and something break again.

then we hear this promisse again.
if we cant ensure that apps writen 5 years ago run fine we can be sure that what we write today wont run in 5 years.

its much easier to target windows then let wine/proton deal with keeping this api/abi compatible to whatever new api/abi linux currently have, you solve the problem once for everyone.

Just for the fun of it I just tried to run UT 2004 that i installed 2010 on my system. I reinstalled the OS several times and even swapped hardware and it still runs out of the box when i start it. Same with other old linux games.

That being said I know Unity has issues but if devs would start to develope games properly from the start it would just run for decades with great performance and compatibility that windows could just dream of.

Exactly this… I have more than a few Linux native games in my library literal decades old that run fine to this day with little to no "tweaking" required.

QuoteThe team at Bounding Box Software had been quiet for some time on their plans here, seemingly ignoring all questions about Linux for many months …

What this says to me is that they weren't thinking about anything but Windows right from the start, and that complete lack of foresight bit them in the arse. I've seen it before, and I'm sure I'll see it again.


Last edited by BlooAlien on 6 September 2022 at 12:33 pm UTC
StalePopcorn Sep 6, 2022
This is the exact route I'd take as a game dev to make sure Linux gamers could enjoy my game—I'd leave out the promise of a Linux native build tho, hopefully pissing off less people.
Termy Sep 6, 2022
Nice to finally hear something. And personally, i'm also fine with official proton support.

BUT - as much as it pain me (again), i will hold out until the next sale to finally grab it. Having a hard time doing the native version and finally ditching it is one thing. Ignoring all questions for the promised native version while having a perfectly running native demo and basically ghosting all Linux gamers for years is unacceptable though. Even the allmighty 'we can't say anthing until the proper release' or something like that is better than the silent treatment...

Quoting: Eikeor had a running native Linux demo for the game to back.
Well, the native Prodeus Demo was running buttery smooth two years ago ;)


Last edited by Termy on 6 September 2022 at 12:52 pm UTC
s0la 8 years Sep 6, 2022
This game looks absolutely amazing.. Hell, I'm really even not into shooters, but I might give this one a shot once I upgrade my hardware :)
akselmo Sep 6, 2022
Not surprising. It is unfortunately easier for Unity gamedevs to use Proton compatibility layer than make separate Linux build.

Prodeus uses Unity. There's always tiny issues when building Unity games to Linux/MacOS. It's an engine clearly made Windows first. Source: I've got like +5 games made with Unity. The point of using Unity for multiplat games is that it always builds similar game for every platform. But in case of Linux and MacOS, it never does!

Anyhow, I hoped the support for Linux native builds would be better these days for Unity. Apparently not.

Hopefully Godot will overthrow Unity someday. Maybe not, but at least it has better Linux build support.

Rant about Unity aside, I don't blame the devs. Annoying for sure. Knowing the quirks of this damn engine, I blame it instead.
iWeaker4You Sep 6, 2022
Quoting: SpykerUnfortunately this is a trend that will go on in the future.
Making native Linux games is hard especially when you have to deal with third party engine which may not handle Linux as well as Windows.

or Linux libraries... it change very frequently and break many applications, it's hard to maintain a software if you can't maintain a stable system, or avoid manipulating the userspace
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