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The System Shock remake from Nightdive Studios was originally funded on Kickstarter, and after delays it was eventually released on May 30th, 2023 but two platforms have been missing - Linux and macOS.

For their crowdfunding campaign, the Linux and macOS versions were a stretch-goal. The base goal for the campaign was $900,000, but they put both Linux and macOS together on a $1.1 million additional goal which was hit, as the campaign finished on around $1,350,700.

Nightdive were pretty silent on both platforms for a long time, especially after they ended up having a lot of issues actually making the game, at one point they entirely paused development on it.

In a new Kickstarter update posted May 21st, 2024 they confirmed neither versions will happen now:

Is System Shock still coming to MacOS and Linux?

Unfortunately no, plans for MacOS and Linux releases of System Shock have been shelved.

macOS is not exactly surprising, Apple are notorious for making things more and more difficult for developers. On the Linux side, it's also not overly surprising given that we have Proton now which enables the game to run with a tick of box on Steam. I even showed it previously running really nicely on Steam Deck with Proton using the demo.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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WorMzy May 23
Quoting: Purple Library Guy
Quoting: pleasereadthemanualMost macOS users are using CrossOver or Whisky, I gather.
I suppose if I were a MacOS user I, too, might be driven to Whisky.
I have to use a Mac for work, and it mostly drives me to rum and homebrew mead..
scaine May 23
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Quoting: elmapulthe issue is that every investiment is a risk
And that would be fine if Kickstarter was open and honest about your "investment" garnering zero reward. But as I've already pointed out, they don't. You pledge at a level, you get a reward, according to their platform. Stretch goals are promised, frequently broken.

And you know what? If an ACTUAL startup took money from an investor based on promises they had no intention of keeping - that's actually illegal, and is called "fraud". So it doesn't fly with me. Kickstarter want their cake, and to eat it.

Once I realised that, over ten years ago, they never got another penny from me.
Quoting: elmapulthe issue is that dont benefit anyone.
an linux version will earn about 4% of the income for the game, and they either will spend more than that, or have to quit supporting windows sooner to keep their promisse of treating every platform equally.

only platform owners care about an specific platform ecosystem, nintendo do with their consoles, microsoft with windows and xbox, and now valve with linux, the main difference is that valve isnt the only linux provider but they have nothing to lose with it growing even if its not their distro, they have everything to lose with microsoft gaining ground on the other hand.
I don't know whether this analysis is still very accurate, but Linux customers can represent significant revenue if you do it in the right way: http://blog.wolfire.com/2010/05/The-state-of-Mac-and-Linux-gaming

Regardless, the point I was making was that having a stretch goal for "we'll make it work on Linux!" is not a selling point anymore. Back when all we could do was beg for a port, we'd be grateful if the developer did anything at all. Linux customers have higher standards now that most of these Kickstarter campaigns will fall short of. Proton has become so good and the bar is now so high that only a vanishingly small subset of developers have created a Linux version that beats Proton because it's hard. And they're almost all indie games, like Factorio. The fact is you get better support with Proton than most native games today, it will work better for longer, and you'll always receive updates at the same cadence as Windows customers.

The feature that killed OS/2 is the feature that set Linux gamers free.

What a world.
Quoting: WorMzy
Quoting: Purple Library Guy
Quoting: pleasereadthemanualMost macOS users are using CrossOver or Whisky, I gather.
I suppose if I were a MacOS user I, too, might be driven to Whisky.
I have to use a Mac for work, and it mostly drives me to rum and homebrew mead..
It's not like being on Linux discounts the option of rum either.
elmapul May 24
Quoting: scaine
Quoting: elmapulthe issue is that every investiment is a risk
And that would be fine if Kickstarter was open and honest about your "investment" garnering zero reward. But as I've already pointed out, they don't. You pledge at a level, you get a reward, according to their platform. Stretch goals are promised, frequently broken.

And you know what? If an ACTUAL startup took money from an investor based on promises they had no intention of keeping - that's actually illegal, and is called "fraud". So it doesn't fly with me. Kickstarter want their cake, and to eat it.

Once I realised that, over ten years ago, they never got another penny from me.

making an game is hard enough, supporting other platforms is a bit harder, at least they delivered some product, but yeah its a shame they didnt suport us, but in the cases where an game isnt finished at least they should relase all the code and assets.

if nothing else, at least this proves they made something


Last edited by elmapul on 24 May 2024 at 12:49 am UTC
elmapul May 24
Quoting: pleasereadthemanual
Quoting: elmapulthe issue is that dont benefit anyone.
an linux version will earn about 4% of the income for the game, and they either will spend more than that, or have to quit supporting windows sooner to keep their promisse of treating every platform equally.

only platform owners care about an specific platform ecosystem, nintendo do with their consoles, microsoft with windows and xbox, and now valve with linux, the main difference is that valve isnt the only linux provider but they have nothing to lose with it growing even if its not their distro, they have everything to lose with microsoft gaining ground on the other hand.
I don't know whether this analysis is still very accurate, but Linux customers can represent significant revenue if you do it in the right way: http://blog.wolfire.com/2010/05/The-state-of-Mac-and-Linux-gaming

Regardless, the point I was making was that having a stretch goal for "we'll make it work on Linux!" is not a selling point anymore. Back when all we could do was beg for a port, we'd be grateful if the developer did anything at all. Linux customers have higher standards now that most of these Kickstarter campaigns will fall short of. Proton has become so good and the bar is now so high that only a vanishingly small subset of developers have created a Linux version that beats Proton because it's hard. And they're almost all indie games, like Factorio. The fact is you get better support with Proton than most native games today, it will work better for longer, and you'll always receive updates at the same cadence as Windows customers.

The feature that killed OS/2 is the feature that set Linux gamers free.

What a world.

i remember seeing that linux represented 20% of the first humble bundles, sure we had an small marketshare , but we didnt had any games back then, we were hungry for games, so we were willing to accept anything, high demand for low supply made us an good target.

nowadays this is not a problem anymore.
I'd rather play it through Proton, anyway. lol. Ports are almost always an inferior experience compared to just playing through Proton.


Last edited by TromboneSteve on 24 May 2024 at 1:35 pm UTC
Quoting: elmapulmaking an game is hard enough, supporting other platforms is a bit harder
That's true, but that's why it's a stretch goal, where they promised to do it if they got extra money. And they got to define how much extra money it would require before they were willing to support other platforms. They could have not promised it, they could have made it a bigger stretch goal--the whole thing was totally their decision. Then they went back on their word.
Mind you, Kickstarter as a whole really pushes away from the philosophy of "underpromise, overdeliver".


Last edited by Purple Library Guy on 24 May 2024 at 4:49 pm UTC
Krakn3dfx May 24
This just leaves a stain on them as a developer that uses Kickstarter, if they plan to Kickstart more games in the future, you can be sure this will come up, and deservedly so. I wouldn't give them any money.
elmapul May 25
Quoting: Purple Library Guy
Quoting: elmapulmaking an game is hard enough, supporting other platforms is a bit harder
That's true, but that's why it's a stretch goal, where they promised to do it if they got extra money. And they got to define how much extra money it would require before they were willing to support other platforms. They could have not promised it, they could have made it a bigger stretch goal--the whole thing was totally their decision. Then they went back on their word.
Mind you, Kickstarter as a whole really pushes away from the philosophy of "underpromise, overdeliver".

if they earned enough money to have a profit, but porting was way more expensive thean they antecipated, at least they should try to refund people who purchased the non existent linux port
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