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Flathub continues growing with over 2 billion downloads recorded

By - | Views: 27,829

Flathub, the main front-end for Flatpak packages, which serves various applications and games to many different Linux distributions and Steam Deck has surpassed 2 billion downloads.

At time of writing there's been 2,004,922,946 downloads. To me, it's quite worth celebrating. Long have we seen the complaints from people wanting to switch to Linux, or testing out the waters, with how fractured the ecosystem is overall. You've seen the complaints at some point I'm sure.

But, being able to tell people "just download it from Flathub", and for a lot of Linux distributions that's now simply a case of opening up the local software app like GNOME Software or KDE Discover, it's a different and much easier world.

From the Flathub Statistics page:

A keen eye might note when it started rocketing upwards. As a reminder, the Steam Deck from Valve released in February 2022, and it certainly seems like around that time it started shooting up. Not surprising, since a lot of people enjoy the Steam Deck's Desktop Mode, which is powered by KDE Plasma with Flathub being the way to install most things there.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
Tags: Misc, Open Source
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I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly.
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12 comments
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I just wish a few more apps would get official flathub. I've been trying to get 0 A.D. to officially sanction their flathub, but no luck so far. They have an official snap, with help from cannonical, but no Flathub. Sigh.
dibz Jun 24
I just wish software managers would be more transparent about who packages various flats. I've seen a lot of talk when people tell others to just install flats, and they think they're official and that's just the way to do it. Sometimes it's even true.
Numeric Jun 24
Speaking as someone who is running a system primarily powered by verified Flathub flatpaks, I really like the experience. With less free time in my life, I have really come to appreciate the simplicity that Flathub brings to the table (particularity avoiding dependency issues and offering rollback functionally for buggy software releases).

That being said, there are many "mainstream" apps that really need verified status (my current wish list includes VLC, GNUCash, Steam, Blender, Inkscape and Nextcloud Desktop). Hard disk space wise, flatpaks haven't been too bad either. For 61 apps (and their runtimes) I'm only looking at 21.9 GB. Which in comparison to the games I run, this is nothing.


Last edited by Numeric on 24 June 2024 at 7:54 pm UTC
Linux_Rocks Jun 24
I don't try to use flatpaks unless it's the best option.
sarmad Jun 24
Nice. It's good to see that Steam Deck owners are also tinkering around with the desktop. This will help let people know that Linux desktop is now far more usable than most people think.
amatai Jun 25
I have a mixed feeling about Flatpack. I have the impression it tries to replace package repositery whereas the problem is that distribution repository should be extended.
We don't need flatpack or snap or whatever for Mozzila, Gnome or KDE softwares. The FOSS software from highly trusted source are the easiest things to maintain on distribution repo. Flathub should be mostly commercial or more obscure FOSS project and software store app should be able to mix distro software when it makes the most sense and packaged software.
tohur Jun 25
Quoting: amataiI have a mixed feeling about Flatpack. I have the impression it tries to replace package repositery whereas the problem is that distribution repository should be extended.
We don't need flatpack or snap or whatever for Mozzila, Gnome or KDE softwares. The FOSS software from highly trusted source are the easiest things to maintain on distribution repo. Flathub should be mostly commercial or more obscure FOSS project and software store app should be able to mix distro software when it makes the most sense and packaged software.

for distros like SteamOS and Bazzite and every immutable distro they are essential. I am actually making a distriso based on bazzite with all the uneeded bloat removed and its heavily flatpak focused. Flatpak has alot of pain points I get it which is why I am hoping to solve a bit of them in my distro lol. Themes work out the box in mine and working on having sane default permissions so things just work hopefully.. so far on my machine which I daily drive it it works great.


Last edited by tohur on 25 June 2024 at 12:33 pm UTC
LoudTechie Jun 25
Quoting: sarmadNice. It's good to see that Steam Deck owners are also tinkering around with the desktop. This will help let people know that Linux desktop is now far more usable than most people think.

I've mixed feelings about that.
At one side it's a sign of failure, at the other it's a driver for improvement.
Pros:
A. Everyone tinkering on Linux makes the whole ecosystem slightly better, just by trying to improve their own experience and gaining expertise, information and sometimes even code to improve it(whoo FOSS collab).
B. It shows to them the value of controlling your own system.
Cons:
A. These people don't tinker for fun, but to run the software they want to run, which indicates that the out of the box experience is still subpar.
dibz Jun 25
Quoting: amataiI have a mixed feeling about Flatpack. I have the impression it tries to replace package repositery whereas the problem is that distribution repository should be extended.
We don't need flatpack or snap or whatever for Mozzila, Gnome or KDE softwares. The FOSS software from highly trusted source are the easiest things to maintain on distribution repo. Flathub should be mostly commercial or more obscure FOSS project and software store app should be able to mix distro software when it makes the most sense and packaged software.

Agreed, and maybe I'm just old and bitter about things changing, but I strongly blame the popularity of rolling distributions (Looking at you, Arch). Not that rolling distributions are a new concept or anything, but they didn't used to be so mainstream/popular. Frankly, most people never needed the latest and greatest packages/ABIs at all times, and repositories were awesome -- and used to be a hugely touted benefit over the competition (Windows).

Frankly, with snaps, flats, and appimages I dare say Linux has become kind of a pain in the ass lately. Even debs/rpms are rarely distributed via repository anymore, often just being resources alongside things like appimages in github releases. The only things that aren't annoying these days are base system packages, because they're updated and distributed via repositories.
sarmad Jun 25
Quoting: LoudTechie
Quoting: sarmadNice. It's good to see that Steam Deck owners are also tinkering around with the desktop. This will help let people know that Linux desktop is now far more usable than most people think.

I've mixed feelings about that.
At one side it's a sign of failure, at the other it's a driver for improvement.
Pros:
A. Everyone tinkering on Linux makes the whole ecosystem slightly better, just by trying to improve their own experience and gaining expertise, information and sometimes even code to improve it(whoo FOSS collab).
B. It shows to them the value of controlling your own system.
Cons:
A. These people don't tinker for fun, but to run the software they want to run, which indicates that the out of the box experience is still subpar.

Not exactly. We are not talking about people tinkering; we don't know how many people are tinkering around with the desktop. This graph shows you people downloading new apps from Flathub, which means they are people looking beyond what can be found in the Steam store. They could be installing emulators, open source games, or maybe some desktop apps, and that has nothing to do with the experience being subpar. Quite the contrary, this is a positive experience where you are not locked down like is the case with consoles.
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