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TUXEDO tease an ARM Snapdragon X Elite Linux notebook is coming

By - | Views: 14,554

TUXEDO Computers have teased that they're working on an ARM notebook with a Snapdragon X Elite SoC from Qualcomm. It's not just Microsoft and Apple making an ARM push, Linux users will be able to get in on the fun officially soon too.

The hardware vendor explained in a news post that they recently presented a prototype of the ARM notebook they're working on at Computex, and they have the specifications of it now finalised. Work is ongoing though, like getting everything ported over and working on ARM fully.

The specs for their first ARM notebook as teased are:

  • Qualcomm Snapdragon X Elite, 12 cores, 20 W TDP (model X1E80100 in the prototype)
  • 14" 16:10 IPS screen at 2560 x 1600
  • Aluminium body with USB4, HDMI
  • 50Wh battery
  • 32GB LPDDR5X
  • 1x M.2 PCIe Gen 4 SSD slot

As Qualcomm themselves explained in a blog post they're working on getting full Linux support all sorted, as they said "It’s been our priority not only to support Linux on our premium-tier SoCs, but to support it pronto". And with the Snapdragon X Elite, they had a patchset ready for the Linux kernel the day after announcement back in October last year.

It should be truly ready hopefully in Linux kernel 6.11.

When it comes to the status of the project at TUXEDO, they said their first prototype is about to be replaced by a second, but they're still in the "alpha" stages. However, they said it's "quite conceivable that an ARM notebook from TUXEDO will be under your Christmas tree in 2024".

Exciting times for hardware!

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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About the author -
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I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly.
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9 comments

elmapul 2 days ago
this may be one one those races where the only way to win is not to compete.

i mean, arm conversion will break backward compatibility , so the ones who dont try to migrate to arm might actually make money while everyone else loses.

or maybe this can work...
Boldos 2 days ago
View PC info
  • Supporter
Hmm.... I wonder what GPU and/or NPU capabilities this thing has?
LoudTechie 2 days ago
Quoting: elmapulthis may be one one those races where the only way to win is not to compete.

i mean, arm conversion will break backward compatibility , so the ones who dont try to migrate to arm might actually make money while everyone else loses.

or maybe this can work...

You're misunderstanding the situation.
Linux has been doing ARM for as long as it exists.
I already own a Linux ARM desktop from before Apple.
Yes, it breaks compatibility, with non-open source software, but only in ways the customer expects, because Apple and Windows are doing it too and it hides our own breakage of Windows and Mac api reliant software.
Microsoft had to give up Anti-cheat and tons of more modern Windows api-stuff for Arm.
Apple had to pay crossover tons of money, design custom hardware and strong ARM their entire dev community to switch to ARM.
The entire GNU/LINUX stack has full functionality and decennia of testing in native ARM, essentially all .deb packages have ARM versions.
In ARM Linux will stand out as a shining example of compatibility, because everything has been tested in servers, IOT devices, Phones, Apple devices, game consoles and home labs.

Linux isn't bad at compatibility.
It's the ruling king, since its founding.
The only reason we see so much weakness is, because our view is skewed, because the competition can run native, while GNU/Linux got to build translation layers and even than the problem only remains true for newer stuff, the old stuff runs better on Linux.

They came to challenge each other on our turf.
Lets loot their chambers.

Edit:
Qualcomm and Mediatec support Linux first, Windows second.


Last edited by LoudTechie on 10 June 2024 at 2:54 pm UTC
LoudTechie 2 days ago
Quoting: BoldosHmm.... I wonder what GPU and/or NPU capabilities this thing has?

The X1E80100 has a 45 NPU TOPS.
42MB cache
LPDDRX5 RAM support(on die DDR5 RAM)
source
Vardamir 2 days ago
I have an eye on one of theese
Linux_Rocks 2 days ago
It'll be interesting to see how other open source operating systems like FreeBSD run on it too.
ShadowXeldron 2 days ago
I am interested in an ARM laptop for battery life, but seeing how you can't upgrade the RAM on any of them I'm kind of iffy. 32GB of RAM will at least make it somewhat future proof. At the very least I'm interested to see a Linux-specific vendor have a shot at an ARM laptop.

It's likely going to be able to run all my Firefox tabs, Audacious and emulators just fine, but how well would it be able to handle x86_64 emulation? I'd probably try and build stuff manually to run on native ARM anyway, but I'd like to have the option to run x86_64 software for proprietary software and programs that just won't run on ARM.
LoudTechie 2 days ago
Quoting: ShadowXeldronI am interested in an ARM laptop for battery life, but seeing how you can't upgrade the RAM on any of them I'm kind of iffy. 32GB of RAM will at least make it somewhat future proof. At the very least I'm interested to see a Linux-specific vendor have a shot at an ARM laptop.

It's likely going to be able to run all my Firefox tabs, Audacious and emulators just fine, but how well would it be able to handle x86_64 emulation? I'd probably try and build stuff manually to run on native ARM anyway, but I'd like to have the option to run x86_64 software for proprietary software and programs that just won't run on ARM.

The mnt reform community did all these things with less, but they can finally upgrade their RAM for some time, so now some got a little more breathing space.

Quoting: ShadowXeldronI'd probably try and build stuff manually to run on native ARM anyway
In my experience this isn't needed, but I've seen people talk about it.
The one issue I experienced with having to compile from source is torbrowser, but I haven't tried emulation for that one yet, because I hadn't thought of that.
elmapul a day ago
Quoting: LoudTechie
Quoting: elmapulthis may be one one those races where the only way to win is not to compete.

i mean, arm conversion will break backward compatibility , so the ones who dont try to migrate to arm might actually make money while everyone else loses.

or maybe this can work...

You're misunderstanding the situation.
Linux has been doing ARM for as long as it exists.
I already own a Linux ARM desktop from before Apple.
Yes, it breaks compatibility, with non-open source software, but only in ways the customer expects, because Apple and Windows are doing it too and it hides our own breakage of Windows and Mac api reliant software.
Microsoft had to give up Anti-cheat and tons of more modern Windows api-stuff for Arm.
Apple had to pay crossover tons of money, design custom hardware and strong ARM their entire dev community to switch to ARM.
The entire GNU/LINUX stack has full functionality and decennia of testing in native ARM, essentially all .deb packages have ARM versions.
In ARM Linux will stand out as a shining example of compatibility, because everything has been tested in servers, IOT devices, Phones, Apple devices, game consoles and home labs.

Linux isn't bad at compatibility.
It's the ruling king, since its founding.
The only reason we see so much weakness is, because our view is skewed, because the competition can run native, while GNU/Linux got to build translation layers and even than the problem only remains true for newer stuff, the old stuff runs better on Linux.

They came to challenge each other on our turf.
Lets loot their chambers.

Edit:
Qualcomm and Mediatec support Linux first, Windows second.

i know that linux had support from years ago, but that dont matter.
end users have brand loyality, they dont know about linux or ever heard of it, and in the end of the day, wine compatibility will be the decisive factor, if we can make windows games and softwares run on arm devices faster than microsoft can, then we have a chance.
if neither can satisfy the end user, then we will just waste a lot of resources in this migration atempt.

microsoft have a big advantage, we cant under estimate their brand loyality, trillions of dollars and especially, the fact they will be making the hardware, and will ensure their OS is an first class citizen there and everything else wont.

linux being better was aways the case but never enough, now they will have even more power with this new architecture.


Last edited by elmapul on 11 June 2024 at 9:02 am UTC
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