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Google have confirmed the Stadia launch date is November 19

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Stadia, Google's new fancy Linux-powered game streaming service is officially set to launch on November 19, that is if you forked out for the expensive Stadia Founder's Edition.

In the blog post over on Google, written by John Justice the "Vice President of Product, Stadia", they mention that the Founder's Edition should start arriving on doorsteps on November 19. From then, you will be able to buy and play games beginning at 4PM UTC and it will work across devices right away (so you don't need to use that fancy Chromecast Ultra). As long as your Linux PC has a Chrome browser installed, it should work fine.

However, there's an important note included to say that they will be shipped out "in the same order that pre-orders were received". So if your country still had them available yesterday and you ordered, you're probably in for a wait. Justice said once your package ships, you will then get an email and sometime shortly after a code to activate it all.

As a reminder, while Stadia is a game streaming service it's not like Netflix since you do still need to buy the games just like you would on Steam or GOG. The "Pro" subscription at around £8.99 / $9.99 a month gives you 4K, surround sound, discounts and the occasional free game. The Base Stadia account is not a subscription but it's not free, since again you buy games.

We have a Stadia Founder's Edition ordered to cover here, so keep an eye out later next month to see what we think of it. Well, whenever our unit arrives anyway, we're probably way back in the queue due to when we confirmed our order.

Google also put out a quick overview video today too:

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There was a note in the video that you can only use the Stadia Controller in wireless mode with the Chromecast Ultra on a TV at launch, although wired mode and other gamepads/keyboard will work fine on PC.

Apart from the launch date and the note about shipping based on the order queue, no other info was given out. They also didn't mention if anyone can buy a Stadia Pro subscription then or if everyone else just has to wait until next year when Stadia rolls out fully.

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58 comments
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Kimyrielle 16 October 2019 at 2:46 pm UTC
Skipperro
Liam DaweStill, not entirely sure who their market is exactly...

As someone who works in the company selling Gaming-PCs I can tell you, because I've done research about possible Stadia impact on our sales.
If you are interested, I can share the details with you, but to get the picture - if you look at the Stadia not as as a service on your PC, but as a hardware replacement, it's a great deal.

There is no PC, that would play all the games they will have in 4K for 10$ a month (360$ given average PC lifespan of 3 years). Even if I calculated all the extra costs like extra money per month for faster Internet and ignored price for electricity, it's still, from economic point of view, in the best-case scenario - the same. If you want to have a PC for the Internet browsing and games, you will spend less money buying cheap, entry level PC and Stadia subscription than a 4K capable machine.

And if you only want to play in FullHD - I cannot even compare the prices, because local PC will always cost something and Stadia is free so... divide by zero exception!

I say it over and over again in every Stadia discussion - look at it from the perspective of someone who wants to buy a new Gaming PC, because it's meant to replace hardware and compete with local, mainstream gaming rigs. From this perspective, their market seems pretty big to me.

I dunno. At the same time, people willing to spend big bucks on gaming PCs are also the ones who optimize everything to squeeze every last bit of performance out of their rigs and who throw a tantrum when their ISP has a hiccup night, giving them an extra 2ms of lag. Why would these people want a service that's -guaranteed- to perform worse than their Alienware PC?
Likewise, casual players tend to not care about 4K and a few extra FX effects on their games. There are by far the the biggest slice of the market, and they happily play games on low-end machines that don't break the bank enough to warrant signing up to a streaming service ON TOP of owning a PC to run Office on etc.
On top of that, Moore's Law is (mostly) dead, and PCs last much, much longer than they used to. When in the 1990s you had to replace a PC every other year to continue playing recent games, you can now keep a gaming PC for 4 to 6 years and STILL play the newest games with (most) effects enabled. Which cuts the annual cost of owning a gaming PC down but a fair margin.

I suppose you guys put a lot more thought into this than me, but to me, game streaming still seems to be an equal opportunity offender without any clear target audience.
iiari 16 October 2019 at 3:02 pm UTC
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Skipperro...but there is more to it than you just economics.

-Parents will be able to better control, both the content they kids are playing and the time.
-If the kid don't behave, parents can always cancel subscription, which gives them nice parenting tool.
As a (deeply conflicted gamer) parent of two young girls who just now are starting to show interest in gaming and wanting to that independently from me, these are huge factors I've considered and it's possible Stadia will be the first service I introduce them to, on their Linux devices of course .

I actually think the bigger future threat to your company, though, is still the next generation's love affair with mobile. My kids, for example, love Minecraft, and prefer to play it on mobile phones to computers with big monitors... They just love the touchscreen UI and want absolutely nothing to do with mice or keyboards. Flight sims might change that soon for my older daughter, though... BTW, if anyone has educational or coding game recommendations on Linux beyond GCompris, please PM me...

SkipperroAlso, many people don't know anything about PC hardware... Stadia will be much easier to start and don't require any investments. If it will be bad, you don't lose anything, you simply stop using it. If your 1000$ PC is bad, you've lost 1000$.
All also absolutely true...

BTW, I think one way forward for gaming hardware makers is embrace that future and try to optimize as much as possible the streaming performance on their machines. The day will come when having top-draw networking, memory, and GPU's will result in a difference gaming experience on, say, a Chromebook than what someone will have with a dedicated gaming rig... That MS 2020 Flight Sim streams its scenery, but still had machines there with 2080Ti's to make it all work in 4K. Companies like yours should try to make that purchasing experience as easy, understandable, and up-gradable as possible.


Last edited by iiari on 16 October 2019 at 3:05 pm UTC
Skipperro 16 October 2019 at 3:03 pm UTC
@Kimyrielle

Well, partially true - high-end sector probably won't be affected by Stadia (at least for next 10 years), as there is a group of people, that want to play in 144 FPS, they know their PCs well, customize them, have water-cooling ect. In fact - our strategy to stay relevant in the future is to shift more into those high-end needs and offer a unique, custom, work-of-art PCs.

Lag... will have to test it, but if you believe Goggle's marketing team - compared to current consoles, it could actually be lower. It's technically possible. Don't forget that frame processing also takes time. Even mouse connected to your PC have about 12 ms lag.

Moore's Law ending... this is the reason why in the long run (10+ years) streaming will have massive advantage over desktop PCs. Right now all the big players like Microsoft, NVIDIA and Google knows, that current way of computing stuff in a small tower case it at its limits. If you want to have a game, that have hundreds of enemies (or players) at once in one place and simultaneously offers photo-realistic graphic, you won't be able to do it on a single CPU. Forget it. Your only option is a server cluster running massively multi-threaded API like Vulkan, using branch predictions (calculating possible frames before user input) and other advanced techy-stuff.
That's why Microsoft have their streaming service, Sony and NVIDIA too. They all already look for the 10 years+ future and they all see the same. If we want more complex, prettier games, streaming is not the best way - it's the only way.

You will soon start to see games, that are designed for Stadia and will run only as a streaming with no local version available, because of technical reasons.


Last edited by Skipperro on 16 October 2019 at 3:05 pm UTC
iiari 16 October 2019 at 3:07 pm UTC
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SkipperroIf we want more complex, prettier games, streaming is not the best way - it's the only way.
Couldn't agree more....
Kimyrielle 16 October 2019 at 4:12 pm UTC
SkipperroIf you want to have a game, that have hundreds of enemies (or players) at once in one place and simultaneously offers photo-realistic graphic, you won't be able to do it on a single CPU. Forget it. Your only option is a server cluster running massively multi-threaded API like Vulkan, using branch predictions (calculating possible frames before user input) and other advanced techy-stuff.

That's a truly good point! For some games, even modern day computing power won't be enough, and I guess the only way that kind of game can be realized is by it running in a cloud. Microsoft's Flight Simulator is a good example of that already happening.

My counterpoint to that would be that there is no reason for EVERY game to be cloud hosted. While a photo-realistic flight simulator has to be, Stardew Valley profits exactly not at all from being remotely hosted. Cloud hosted gaming isn't exactly a new thing anyway. My favorite genre is MMORPGs, and these have been remotely hosted even back in the days when they didn't re-brand the thing we used to call a cluster-server to "cloud". I think you're totally right that we're going to see more and more cloud-based games actually making USE of the cloud other than just being a DRM scheme. But while games like MS Flight might do that, streaming these games in their entirety is not a necessity, still. Personally I foresee more a future that will use the cloud for performance-heavy operations and let the local client process what makes sense to do there, which is probably the best of both worlds. That's what MS Flight is doing, after all.

Time will tell, I guess.
Purple Library Guy 16 October 2019 at 8:46 pm UTC
iiari
cxpher@gmail.comIt's not the Netflix of gaming. You don't get a catalog of games to deal with.

You still have to buy your games on Stadia. Stadia simply helps offload it off the hardware.
That was my point, it wont' be the Netflix of gaming, which I think was a huge opportunity lost. As I posted above, I'm really surprised for how great the tech is that Google isn't being more aggressive with positioning this, because I think they're only, say, 85% confident in the tech status right now, not 100%. And as a long time Google fan and purchaser, they're honestly terrible at marketing and positioning their products...
They do seem to have this approach along the lines of "Build it and they will come, and then we'll, um, monetize it somehow." Then when it works, it works big, and when it doesn't, they fold the tent.
From a consumer perspective this can be good and bad. Seems like sometimes the answer comes back, "Looks like we have a way to monetize this, but it's pretty evil." and the response is "Oh well, pity we have to do that, but the next cool product won't make itself." So where say Microsoft in the old days was pretty much based on the model "Plan and commit evil acts to profit", Google may stumble into evil at times precisely because it doesn't have a plan outside the technology itself.
I may be way off base, this is just an impression.
Purple Library Guy 16 October 2019 at 8:54 pm UTC
iiariI actually think the bigger future threat to your company, though, is still the next generation's love affair with mobile. My kids, for example, love Minecraft, and prefer to play it on mobile phones to computers with big monitors... They just love the touchscreen UI and want absolutely nothing to do with mice or keyboards.
The younger generation may well move away from dinky little screens as they, and more specifically, their eyes, get older. I've always felt doing much gaming on phones is a recipe for eyestrain.
We may see stuff to let them have a UI similar to a phone one while still using a bigger screen. Either big touchscreens or, hey, maybe you could do a dual screen setup where one screen is a small touchscreen, or even your phone itself, which you use for UI control, while actual documents, games etc. show on the big screen/s.
elmapul 18 October 2019 at 7:06 am UTC
DesumOh goodie. The ultimate DRM and censorship scheme. I'm so excited this is being warmly received because the servers happen to be running on Linux.

i'm worried about DRM and censorship too, but lets take it easy for now.
just remember that chromeOS was online only too when it launched, i think stadia is just an temporary solution until they can get more marketshare for their chromeOS, then they will be able to entice more developers to add offline capabilities too.
actually, chromeOS may be the reason why they are doing stadia anyway, its the only way to make it grow, without games it would strugle to grow otherwise.
also, i'm pretty sure that sony or microsoft will attack that disadvantage that stadia has to attack it, so they will have to respond.

also: onlive is not alive anymore, not because the company was bankrupt but because they where acquired by sony to use their technology on psnow...
lets just remember that before they shut down their servers they offered the option to download your games from they. (cloud lift)

in any case.
be the future an utopy or an distopy, there is NOTHING we can do about it.


Last edited by elmapul on 18 October 2019 at 7:18 am UTC
elmapul 18 October 2019 at 7:13 am UTC
chancho_zombie
Liam Dawe
chancho_zombie
Quoteand it will work across devices right away (so you don't need to use that fancy Chromecast Ultra). As long as your Linux PC has a Chrome browser installed, it should work fine.

I don't get this it should work on normal chrome browser even on android phones??. So then it should work in a normal Chromecast UH?
From what I read somewhere, it's because the original Chromecast doesn't support VP9.

I still don't get it. Wasn't stadia supposed to be interconnected with youtube?? I can stream from my linux pc with chrome or from my android phone to my chromecast, why should it be any different? I guess will have to wait to know the details why this is not possible.

you need to decode things fast in order to get an good experience, they only way to do that is with either an good processor, video card or asic.
chromecast 3 probably has an asic for vp9, and new phones can do that either by an asic on the cpu, the gpu or by bruthe force (without an dedicated hardware extension, using more cycles to process the same information, but still doing it fast enough)


Last edited by elmapul on 18 October 2019 at 7:14 am UTC
Eike 18 October 2019 at 8:03 am UTC
elmapulyou need to decode things fast in order to get an good experience, they only way to do that is with either an good processor, video card or asic.

Current integrated graphics have built-in VP9 support.
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