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Along with the announcement that 3D Realms has teamed with 1C Entertainment for a console release of Ion Maiden, a new release window has been given along with fresh screenshots and a teaser for another new FPS game.

The retro first-person shooter developed by Voidpoint using the Build engine, which powered Duke Nukem 3D, Blood, and Shadow Warrior will simultaneously release on all platforms in Q2 2019. Once we get a clearer idea of when this will be, we will update you on that of course.

Additionally, here's some new screenshots they've shared (click to enlarge):

On top of that, they also said this in the PR email to us:

Both companies will also collaborate on a new unannounced FPS based on the original Quake engine coming to all the same platforms as Ion Maiden.

I've reached out to see if that does mean Linux to for the next title, you would think so from the wording but you can never be too careful. Since Ion Maiden from Voidpoint has Linux support, hopefully 3D Realms went with a developer who can do Linux support again as I understand this new title is not being developed by Voidpoint.

If you're interested in trying out the impressive preview campaign that's currently live for Ion Maiden, it's available on GOG and Steam.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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mirv 23 Oct, 2018
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Quoting: GuestQuake engine has linux support so no biggie. oh, if they use VKquake they can take advantage of vulkan.

It might be better for them _not_ to use Vulkan though. This is the sort of game that won't be hitting graphics bottlenecks (probably), and they might want to include older machines, or those platforms that don't have Vulkan drivers. Sticking to an OpenGL backend makes more sense in those cases, and gives them a wider audience.
Comandante Ñoñardo 23 Oct, 2018
Quoting: mirv
Quoting: GuestQuake engine has linux support so no biggie. oh, if they use VKquake they can take advantage of vulkan.

It might be better for them _not_ to use Vulkan though. This is the sort of game that won't be hitting graphics bottlenecks (probably), and they might want to include older machines, or those platforms that don't have Vulkan drivers. Sticking to an OpenGL backend makes more sense in those cases, and gives them a wider audience.

I agree.
Games with retro graphics must work on retro machines with retro operative systems.
mirv 23 Oct, 2018
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Quoting: Guest
Quoting: Comandante Ñoñardo
Quoting: mirv
Quoting: GuestQuake engine has linux support so no biggie. oh, if they use VKquake they can take advantage of vulkan.

It might be better for them _not_ to use Vulkan though. This is the sort of game that won't be hitting graphics bottlenecks (probably), and they might want to include older machines, or those platforms that don't have Vulkan drivers. Sticking to an OpenGL backend makes more sense in those cases, and gives them a wider audience.

I agree.
Games with retro graphics must work on retro machines with retro operative systems.

There is one advantage to using VkQuake, and that is that this engine can use software mode specific effects that the GL version didn't have, like water distortion.

I would presume they'd do some engine customisation; there's nothing stopping more effects going into an engine with a GL render backend. Also, I'm not quite sure what you mean by "software mode" there - I don't think they'll be using a software rasteriser.
Shmerl 23 Oct, 2018
I don't think using Vulkan engine is an issue. Supporting retro hardware is an extra effort (for one, they'd need to test on it for example so they need actual hardware). Just because they are using a retro style engine doesn't mean they need to support retro computers.

For example, I won't appreciate if they'll make the release 32-bit because of it (Ion Maiden is 64-bit if I remember correctly, so that already makes it unusable on the old 32-bit computers).


Last edited by Shmerl on 23 October 2018 at 4:15 pm UTC
mirv 23 Oct, 2018
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Quoting: GuestIf the recommended requirments stay at 2gb vram then anyone running the game using those recommended requirements should be able to run vulkan anyway

I really can't see keeping to opengl that effective at "reaching a wider audience" if system requires need 2gb vram anyway

The vram requirement is probably for textures. Use lower quality textures, tweak a couple other things, and perhaps the game might run on, say, a raspberry pi3.

Also, hardware requirements aside, OpenGL is almost certainly going to be easier to maintain, and there's really going to be no need for some of the Vulkan benefits in this case.
mirv 23 Oct, 2018
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Quoting: Guest
Quoting: mirv
Quoting: GuestIf the recommended requirments stay at 2gb vram then anyone running the game using those recommended requirements should be able to run vulkan anyway

I really can't see keeping to opengl that effective at "reaching a wider audience" if system requires need 2gb vram anyway

The vram requirement is probably for textures. Use lower quality textures, tweak a couple other things, and perhaps the game might run on, say, a raspberry pi3.

Also, hardware requirements aside, OpenGL is almost certainly going to be easier to maintain, and there's really going to be no need for some of the Vulkan benefits in this case.

A pi3? I've got a PI3 and pretty sure I couldn't just install my linux games on an arm architecture just like that

One would presume it would be recompiled. I thought that obvious.
But perhaps Intel Atom instead would suit you better. Then again, I would still have a llano laptop, though it's with a friend now. It still runs. So the question is really: what would Vulkan give this game? I can't actually think of any benefits it would bring to something like "this" (actually something based on the Quake engine).
mirv 23 Oct, 2018
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Quoting: Guest
Quoting: mirv
Quoting: Guest
Quoting: mirv
Quoting: GuestIf the recommended requirments stay at 2gb vram then anyone running the game using those recommended requirements should be able to run vulkan anyway

I really can't see keeping to opengl that effective at "reaching a wider audience" if system requires need 2gb vram anyway

The vram requirement is probably for textures. Use lower quality textures, tweak a couple other things, and perhaps the game might run on, say, a raspberry pi3.

Also, hardware requirements aside, OpenGL is almost certainly going to be easier to maintain, and there's really going to be no need for some of the Vulkan benefits in this case.

A pi3? I've got a PI3 and pretty sure I couldn't just install my linux games on an arm architecture just like that

One would presume it would be recompiled. I thought that obvious.
But perhaps Intel Atom instead would suit you better. Then again, I would still have a llano laptop, though it's with a friend now. It still runs. So the question is really: what would Vulkan give this game? I can't actually think of any benefits it would bring to something like "this" (actually something based on the Quake engine).

I'm not against the idea of sticking to opengl though

I'm just against the idea of development time going into getting it to run on computers made in the 90's.. Or to get it to run on a raspberry PI3

I can't actually think of any benefits, what benefit does one have from running this on an retro machine? Just play it on some laptop or desktop PC made in the last 10 years, I don't think that's much to ask

Well, I never said retro machines. However, this is the sort of arcade style game that appeals to people, so having the option to run it on the hardware that exists for that sort of thing might be a good idea. It's not necessarily retro hardware, but it's not the sort of thing that might have Vulkan drivers either. Which was my main point about Vulkan for this really.

My original post was intending to say that just because Vulkan could be used, doesn't mean it should, for various reasons. And people seem to have taken that to mean ancient hardware, which isn't the sole scenario (nor even a particular scenario that's useful - older hardware, yes, ancient, no).
TimeFreeze 23 Oct, 2018
Hopefully those more months are going into more Polishing and Optimization. There can never be enough Polishing & Optimization.
mirv 23 Oct, 2018
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Quoting: Guest
Quoting: mirv
Quoting: Guest
Quoting: mirv
Quoting: Guest
Quoting: mirv
Quoting: GuestIf the recommended requirments stay at 2gb vram then anyone running the game using those recommended requirements should be able to run vulkan anyway

I really can't see keeping to opengl that effective at "reaching a wider audience" if system requires need 2gb vram anyway

The vram requirement is probably for textures. Use lower quality textures, tweak a couple other things, and perhaps the game might run on, say, a raspberry pi3.

Also, hardware requirements aside, OpenGL is almost certainly going to be easier to maintain, and there's really going to be no need for some of the Vulkan benefits in this case.

A pi3? I've got a PI3 and pretty sure I couldn't just install my linux games on an arm architecture just like that

One would presume it would be recompiled. I thought that obvious.
But perhaps Intel Atom instead would suit you better. Then again, I would still have a llano laptop, though it's with a friend now. It still runs. So the question is really: what would Vulkan give this game? I can't actually think of any benefits it would bring to something like "this" (actually something based on the Quake engine).

I'm not against the idea of sticking to opengl though

I'm just against the idea of development time going into getting it to run on computers made in the 90's.. Or to get it to run on a raspberry PI3

I can't actually think of any benefits, what benefit does one have from running this on an retro machine? Just play it on some laptop or desktop PC made in the last 10 years, I don't think that's much to ask

Well, I never said retro machines. However, this is the sort of arcade style game that appeals to people, so having the option to run it on the hardware that exists for that sort of thing might be a good idea. It's not necessarily retro hardware, but it's not the sort of thing that might have Vulkan drivers either. Which was my main point about Vulkan for this really.

My original post was intending to say that just because Vulkan could be used, doesn't mean it should, for various reasons. And people seem to have taken that to mean ancient hardware, which isn't the sole scenario (nor even a particular scenario that's useful - older hardware, yes, ancient, no).

Could they not offer an option to switch between opengl and vulkan though?

Like you said the game itself probably wouldn't see much benefit from using vulkan anyway, any computer modern enough to use vulkan would run just fine under gl anyway

Actually I was hoping some of the GL-on-Vulkan projects might be beneficial here. They could put in an option to switch, but developer effort will dictate that at the end of the day.

....ultimately, whatever brings a great game our way though!
Kristian 23 Oct, 2018
Now I am really confused, wasn't the talk about Vulkan about the Quake engine project? But then Ion Maiden's system requirements were bought in to the discussion?

Ion Maiden uses EDuke32 and with it the Polymost OpenGL renderer. Originally created by Ken Silverman, the Build engine's creator.
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