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A random shot in the dark of mine, but it seems to the developer of JASEM [Steam, Official Site], the self-described 'insanely hard' twin-stick shooter could see Linux support.

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About the game:

Do you need any reason to shoot your enemies in game? Because JASEM doesn't give you one - just you, your weapons, crazy beats and enemies. And you need to shoot every one of them, and it's up to you to make it the most hilarious and explosive way.

Here's what the developer said in response to my query:

Hi, sorry for slow response. I made Linux version, but didn't find the way to test it - and it could be various problems with shaders and performance, so until I find testers I can't release it.

Pretty positive response! So if you fancy testing, let them know in the Steam forum post.

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11 comments
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Leopard 18 Oct, 2017
Didn't find the way to test it...

Is it that hard just installing a Linux distro for at least self testing?

Probably he just hit that "export" button and called it a day.


Last edited by Leopard on 18 October 2017 at 9:25 pm UTC
Liam Dawe 18 Oct, 2017
Keep in mind that not all developers are some kind of uber geek, Linux is completely fresh territory for some people.
Leopard 18 Oct, 2017
liamdaweKeep in mind that not all developers are some kind of uber geek, Linux is completely fresh territory for some people.

But there is no need to be an uber geek to get a Linux distro ; if you are installing an Ubuntu based distro or even SteamOS. Pretty simple , GUI stuff. Just like Windows.

I don't want them install pure Arch or Gentoo anyway.

I'm not an uber geek too btw.
Liam Dawe 18 Oct, 2017
Leopard
liamdaweKeep in mind that not all developers are some kind of uber geek, Linux is completely fresh territory for some people.

But there is no need to be an uber geek to get a Linux distro ; if you are installing an Ubuntu based distro or even SteamOS. Pretty simple , GUI stuff. Just like Windows.

I don't want them install pure Arch or Gentoo anyway.

I'm not an uber geek too btw.
This is my point, to us installing Linux is easy. You have to imagine how people feel who've never looked into it, a large majority of Windows users/developers have likely never even installed Windows.

People need to step outside the box and understand not everyone is as comfortable as us with new things, especially if say they only have one computer they use for developing their livelihood that they don't want to mess up.
Leopard 18 Oct, 2017
liamdawe
Leopard
liamdaweKeep in mind that not all developers are some kind of uber geek, Linux is completely fresh territory for some people.

But there is no need to be an uber geek to get a Linux distro ; if you are installing an Ubuntu based distro or even SteamOS. Pretty simple , GUI stuff. Just like Windows.

I don't want them install pure Arch or Gentoo anyway.

I'm not an uber geek too btw.
This is my point, to us installing Linux is easy. You have to imagine how people feel who've never looked into it, a large majority of Windows users/developers have likely never even installed Windows.

People need to step outside the box and understand not everyone is as comfortable as us with new things, especially if say they only have one computer they use for developing their livelihood that they don't want to mess up.

I got your point but this assumption of yours is pretty much relevant for "basic , home users " which buying pre loaded computers.

I mean , c'mon... We are talking about a game dev (?) , am i wrong to expect from a dev to be able of installing Windows or Linux?

How can they're fixing bugs then or creating games?

It must be way more complicated than installing an OS.
Liam Dawe 18 Oct, 2017
I don't really get what's hard to grasp here, but okay.

Being good at one thing (making a game on Windows, that might work on multiple OS), does not make someone good (or make something easy) at something else (Linux).

Leopardam i wrong to expect from a dev to be able of installing Windows or Linux?
Yes, you're wrong to just assume everyone should know how to do something.
Leopard 18 Oct, 2017
liamdaweI don't really get what's hard to grasp here, but okay.

Being good at one thing (making a game on Windows, that might work on multiple OS), does not make someone good (or make something easy) at something else (Linux).

Leopardam i wrong to expect from a dev to be able of installing Windows or Linux?
Yes, you're wrong to just assume everyone should know how to do something.

See , that is your problem Liam.

You're just exaggerating "being grateful to devs" approach. Of course we are greatful but eventually we're gonna pay for a product and because of that we will expect support for it. How can a dev maintain support without even bothering to test it himself?

Let's say he provided a succesful build for testers at this time. When something changes from our system's end or drivers end and that breaks the game ; how can he fix this? Or is he even bother to fix it at first place?

When you decided to release a product on Ios , you should test it first.

When you decided to release a product on Windows , on Android , on MacOS , on Linux ; you should test it first.

I don't know what is so hard to grasp here too.


Last edited by Leopard on 18 October 2017 at 11:09 pm UTC
Liam Dawe 18 Oct, 2017
Again, you're making a lot of assumptions here. Who's to say they won't look into testing it themselves in future, they've not specifically said they actually will put out a Linux version yet.

Of course I do expect a developer to arrange their own testing environment once they're sure they're going to sell a Linux version. However, there's absolutely nothing wrong with seeing if someone else can test first before they go through with anything.

Anyway, I've said my bit on this I won't debate this any further since I fear this will go in circles :)
knro 19 Oct, 2017
Don't expect everyone to know (or care) about Linux. Just a few days ago, I needed a developer to test of his products on Linux. I sent him a link to an Ubuntu VM that he downloaded and ran on VirtualBox. Testing was done and everyone is happy. You have to make it easy for developers to take the first baby steps at least.
Doc Angelo 19 Oct, 2017
I'm not sure about this topic. In the 80's and 90's you could be 100% sure that a person who is developing video games is someone who knows his computer in depth. Today, with tools like Game Maker nearly everyone with the will to do it can make games. Hyper Light Drifter was made with Game Maker. For many, it was the game of the year.

Maybe the people who don't try to install Linux do not know yet how easy it is. Also, Linux is not Windows, and so some people give up too early when something doesn't work as expected while trying out Linux.

I think it is reasonable to encourage any developer who puts months and years into a game to take 1 or 2 days to take a good look at Linux.

Edit: Oh, I think this is quite important: It's fine if any dev just don't want to. But then be honest about it and do not release your game if you don't want to test it yourself.


Last edited by Doc Angelo on 19 October 2017 at 1:21 pm UTC
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