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Linux Mint released version 18.3 today.
stretch611 commented on 27 November 2017 at 9:00 pm UTC

Linux Mint 18.3 “Sylvia” Cinnamon released!
Linux Mint 18.3 “Sylvia” MATE released!

How to upgrade to Linux Mint 18.3

Release Notes

Linux Mint 18.3 is a long term support release which will be supported until 2021.

New Features (from Release Notes)
-- The star of the show in Linux Mint 18.3 is the Software Manager.
-- The Software Manager is now also much lighter and faster than before. It no longer uses Webkit, browsing categories and apps is almost immediate, and it launches 3 times faster than before.
-- Linux Mint 18.3 comes with Flatpak installed by default and the new Software Manager fully supports it.
-- The Backup Tool was almost entirely rewritten. Everything was reviewed: Its features, the way it looks and the way it works.
-- Linux Mint 18.3 features Timeshift, a tool dedicated to system snapshots.
-- A new tool called "System Reports" was developed for Linux Mint 18.3. Its goal is to generate reports when software crashes occur, and to show information relevant to your computer and your environment.
-- XApps improvements
-- The login screen is more configurable than before. Options were added for automatic login, so if you're the only one around, you can now set up your computer to log you in without a password. LDAP users will appreciate the ability to hide the user list and enter user names manually. Various user interface elements such as the panel indicators now show tooltips and can be enabled/disabled in the preferences.
-- Linux Mint now features better out of the box support for spell-checking and synonyms in English, German, Spanish, French, Italian, Portuguese and Russian.
-- Redshift was added to the software selection and is now installed by default. This tool adapts the color temperature of your screen based on the time of day, making it look warmer at night to reduce the impact on your eyes.

We will see how easy an upgrade really is depending on my next post to this site. (not necessarily this thread)

razing32 commented on 27 November 2017 at 9:45 pm UTC

Hmm. So how seamless are these upgrades ?
The only reason I moved to the Arch family was rolling upgrades (and also more freedom to build up your os as you like)

stretch611 commented on 27 November 2017 at 10:12 pm UTC

This upgrade was quite painless. Really just the time to download and install the new packages followed by a reboot.

So far, everything is running well. I'm about to check on some of the new features.

That being said, Mint is based on Ubuntu. They used to release every 6 months after a new Ubuntu release. They stopped that with Mint 17 or 18... 18.x is all based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. The Mint roadmark is that Mint 19 will be off the next LTS of Ubuntu. Their reasoning was so that they can spend more time working on improving Mint instead all the compatibility testing every 6 months. Going from 17 to 18 was pretty painless, but a little riskier than a simple point release.

There is also a Mint that is release off of Debian instead of Ubuntu.

QuoteLMDE (Linux Mint Debian Edition) is a very exciting distribution, targeted at experienced users, which provides the same environment as Linux Mint but uses Debian as its package base, instead of Ubuntu.

LMDE is less mainstream than Linux Mint, it has a much smaller user base, it is not compatible with PPAs, and it lacks a few features. That makes it a bit harder to use and harder to find help for, so it is not recommended for novice users.

LMDE is however slightly faster than Linux Mint and it runs newer packages. Life on the LMDE side can be exciting. There are no point releases in LMDE 2, except for bug fixes and security fixes base packages stay the same, but Mint and desktop components are updated continuously. When ready, newly developed features get directly into LMDE 2, whereas they are staged for inclusion on the next upcoming Linux Mint 17.x point release. Consequently, Linux Mint users only run new features when a new point release comes out and they opt-in to upgrade to it. LMDE 2 users don’t have that choice, but they also don’t have to wait for new packages to mature and they usually get to run them first. It’s more risky, but more exciting.

But, so far, so goo♐☾♫⚖☝☦⚢⚡⚡⚡♓♒⚖✉✡✖♜☣☧☧࿋☄✆♣♪✩✖✻

oops

damarrin commented on 28 November 2017 at 8:39 am UTC

I'd never had problems updating Mint, even though it surprises me every time it requires you to go to the command line. Not that it's a bad thing, but it's all very clickable otherwise.

I like the sound of this timeshift thing.

Edit: oh, it looks like it _is_ clickable now. Nice.

razing32 commented on 28 November 2017 at 9:42 am UTC

stretch611There is also a Mint that is release off of Debian instead of Ubuntu.
QuoteLMDE (Linux Mint Debian Edition) is a very exciting distribution, targeted at experienced users, which provides the same environment as Linux Mint but uses Debian as its package base, instead of Ubuntu.

LMDE is less mainstream than Linux Mint, it has a much smaller user base, it is not compatible with PPAs, and it lacks a few features. That makes it a bit harder to use and harder to find help for, so it is not recommended for novice users.

LMDE is however slightly faster than Linux Mint and it runs newer packages. Life on the LMDE side can be exciting. There are no point releases in LMDE 2, except for bug fixes and security fixes base packages stay the same, but Mint and desktop components are updated continuously. When ready, newly developed features get directly into LMDE 2, whereas they are staged for inclusion on the next upcoming Linux Mint 17.x point release. Consequently, Linux Mint users only run new features when a new point release comes out and they opt-in to upgrade to it. LMDE 2 users don’t have that choice, but they also don’t have to wait for new packages to mature and they usually get to run them first. It’s more risky, but more exciting.

Hmm . Wondering how upgrading is on that.
Anyway good you managed to upgrade ok.
Will stick to the arch family for now but curios to give a few distros a spin.

stretch611 commented on 28 November 2017 at 3:56 pm UTC

You can always try other distros by using them in a virtual machine. The only problem with that is games generally do not work very well in a VM. You can try out the various Desktops though. (another way to test is with flash drives and live booting)

Personally, I use MATE. It is pretty lightweight. While my computer has the horsepower and graphics to run a full featured desktop, I don't need the fluff and glitz and would rather save the computing resources for the games or other programs I use.

tuubi commented on 28 November 2017 at 7:46 pm UTC

Nothing too exciting for me personally in the release, but that's how point releases are supposed to be. I'll be waiting for the Xfce variant for a few more weeks anyway.

stretch611 commented on 28 November 2017 at 8:56 pm UTC

I agree... nothing too much but there are a few things.

Personally, I like the login screen changes. I prefer not having a user list on the login screen... It is much harder to guess both a username and a password, then just a password.

I will try redshift... sounds interesting. Flatpack is an interesting thing too, but I am not using it now and get by fine. The Software Manager did get a nice overhaul and is looking much better and quicker, but it is not used enough to make a huge difference IMO. I might try the new reports as well.

A few nice little things, no killer feature... but easy enough to upgrade.

For the record, I use Mint on my desktop machines. I usually use CentOS on my webservers.

tuubi commented on 28 November 2017 at 10:02 pm UTC

stretch611Personally, I like the login screen changes. I prefer not having a user list on the login screen... It is much harder to guess both a username and a password, then just a password.
I guess the login screen updates are nice, but how have I been doing automatic login on my gaming box for ages if it's a new feature?

stretch611I will try redshift... sounds interesting.
My wife uses redshift at night, but I just can't. I like my colours unfiltered thank you.

stretch611 commented on 28 November 2017 at 10:14 pm UTC

Actually, I avoid the userlist. I do not login automatically at all and when someone gets to the login screen, I want to force them to guess my username as well.

If someone ever swipes my laptop, I want to make it harder for them to access anything. While I know any decent hacker and physical access makes getting in just a matter of time, I don't want to help them... or allow less than decent hacks a chance.

tuubi commented on 28 November 2017 at 10:58 pm UTC

stretch611Actually, I avoid the userlist. I do not login automatically at all and when someone gets to the login screen, I want to force them to guess my username as well.
That totally makes sense, but not on the gaming/media box attached to my TV. I just want it to start up quickly and let me play some games.

Our laptops and my work desktop are naturally better protected.

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