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Don't you love it when Windows eats itself?
slaapliedje commented on 29 July 2019 at 3:49 am UTC

Decided I wanted to play some Elite: Dangerous. Start up SteamVR, start heading to a place to collect some things, and system freeze. Reboot, start up SteamVR again, didn't even get me in the game before it locked up again.

Remove some stuff, like Vive Port, which previously caused issues, but then the Vive wouldn't work, but now I have an Index, so removed that crap... and still freezing.

In the midst of troubleshooting the error, it gives you a stopcodes link, which doesn't even list the error it was giving, tried some suggestions like enabling driver verification, which then sent it into a boot loop.

So, needless to say, I give up troubleshooting the damn thing, just gonna re-install... ugh, which means then I get the fun of fixing grub afterward. Good thing I have trusty Debian to kill some time while the media creation tool does it's thing...

ManuelMcCurry commented on 13 August 2019 at 8:56 am UTC

I constantly have problems with this game, so I am not surprised.

slaapliedje commented on 13 August 2019 at 4:13 pm UTC

ManuelMcCurryI constantly have problems with this game, so I am not surprised.
Sadly it isn't just that game that was crashing, pretty much anything in VR (I was trying to watch the last season of Game of Thrones in VR and it would crash at least three times per episode. Maybe the computer was just as angry at how the last season went as everyone else )

Kiba commented on 20 September 2019 at 7:48 am UTC

Well, i'm having worse problems on Linux with SteamVR, i just can't use it, it freezes everytime at launch, and the few times i manage to get it working the stuttering is horrible.
I literally paid 1000$ for a piece of hardware i can't use, is pathetic. And the thing is working great on Windows.

Ehvis commented on 20 September 2019 at 11:19 am UTC

KibaWell, i'm having worse problems on Linux with SteamVR, i just can't use it, it freezes everytime at launch, and the few times i manage to get it working the stuttering is horrible.
I literally paid 1000$ for a piece of hardware i can't use, is pathetic. And the thing is working great on Windows.

Do you have a GSYNC display? I've been having a lot of stutter (and tearing) as well. It got a ton better when turned off reprojection completely. It has been suggested that GSYNC might be interfering with the VR compositor, but disabling it in the settings didn't improve it for me. I haven't gone as far as to try and disable it completely in the X config.

Unfortunately, the trick to turn off reprojection doesn't seem to work anymore. I need to make a report about that because the feature is behaving very erratic for me. So bad that I can have a stable 8 MS frame time in SteamVR home and the frametime graph will have whole sections turning orange (which means reprojection is active) while frametimes don't change at all.

All in all, VR definitely a work in progress on Linux.

Kiba commented on 20 September 2019 at 10:10 pm UTC

Ehvis
KibaWell, i'm having worse problems on Linux with SteamVR, i just can't use it, it freezes everytime at launch, and the few times i manage to get it working the stuttering is horrible.
I literally paid 1000$ for a piece of hardware i can't use, is pathetic. And the thing is working great on Windows.

Do you have a GSYNC display? I've been having a lot of stutter (and tearing) as well. It got a ton better when turned off reprojection completely. It has been suggested that GSYNC might be interfering with the VR compositor, but disabling it in the settings didn't improve it for me. I haven't gone as far as to try and disable it completely in the X config.

Unfortunately, the trick to turn off reprojection doesn't seem to work anymore. I need to make a report about that because the feature is behaving very erratic for me. So bad that I can have a stable 8 MS frame time in SteamVR home and the frametime graph will have whole sections turning orange (which means reprojection is active) while frametimes don't change at all.

All in all, VR definitely a work in progress on Linux.
I have a 144hz screen, but is not G-Sync compatible, could i be affected by that?

The performance is terrible and i have a GTX1070, on Windows everything works great... I've heard of more nVidia problems with VR on Linux, I may be go full red team next year, but they have a lot of issues with Linux from what i read here and there... I hope the chinese improve their microprocessors in the next years so we can have more competition.

notinuse commented on 20 September 2019 at 10:20 pm UTC

Microsoft Windows. I haven't had to use that since I quit my last job five and a half years ago. Simplified things a lot.

The_Aquabat commented on 20 September 2019 at 11:45 pm UTC

Quoteugh, which means then I get the fun of fixing grub afterward

here's a funny fact . I got tired of windows messing up with my bios, everytime I booted it became the first boot default. So I removed windows option all together with the uefibootmgr. Now only way windows can boot is with grub. Guess what?? now everytime I boot windows it tries to do something or write something to my uefi boot partition, and it gets corrupted. I don't know what it does but everytime I boot windows I then have to run fsck on the boot partition. This happens when booting not even installing

g000h commented on 21 September 2019 at 6:27 am UTC

This is how I've set up Windows and Linux on my past 3 main desktops:

Set up Windows first, typically on a mechanical HDD (e.g. 2TB), occupying only a small portion of the drive (e.g. the first 500GB) leaving the rest empty. Put in a second hard drive, typically SSD and switch the BIOS to make that the primary boot-up drive. Install Linux, with default grub2 as the boot loader. The grub2 boot loader should detect the Windows partitions and automatically provide a Windows Boot option in the grub2 menu. On start-up, choose which one you want to boot into. Also, I tend to then use LVM2 and set up the remaining space on the "Windows" HDD as additional storage for Linux.

I've not had any conflicts or problems running it this way, and Windows is still able to boot normally, if I take the Linux drive out of the system.

dvd commented on 21 September 2019 at 8:39 am UTC

chancho_zombie
Quoteugh, which means then I get the fun of fixing grub afterward

here's a funny fact . I got tired of windows messing up with my bios, everytime I booted it became the first boot default. So I removed windows option all together with the uefibootmgr. Now only way windows can boot is with grub. Guess what?? now everytime I boot windows it tries to do something or write something to my uefi boot partition, and it gets corrupted. I don't know what it does but everytime I boot windows I then have to run fsck on the boot partition. This happens when booting not even installing

Your window's must be smart then. I had to install windows 10 on a relatives laptop recently, and it couldn't even format the drive. I had to get a live gparted image and create it's efi scheme by hand.

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