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Gaming on Linux for Kids
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HerrLange 28 May
Thx for the new input, Still appreciated.

In the meanwhile I transgressed my own policies and my Kids have now an own steam account even if they are not yet 12.

I did this because a lot of suggestions here required steam. Secondly they are actually hooked on Yu-Gi-Oh! and they wished to play cards (and the computer is cheaper than the real cards ;-) ). So I bought a copy of Yu-Gi-Oh! Legacy of the Duelist for them and they really like it.

My daughter is now 10 years old and my son 8 years old. If yours can read I can recommend Yu-Gi-Oh! Legacy of the Duelist.

But I'm very skeptical regarding the free to play MMOG card games like Yu-Gi-Oh! Master Duell, Haerthstone, etc. So I'm glad that there is still the legacy of real games without pay2win and huge grind requirements. I actually try to explain them that time has a value and such "free to play" games try to take your time and therefore are not really for free.
denyasis 29 May
Quoting: AngryAntRegarding screen time limits that happens quite naturally on weekdays with school + after-school club not leaving much time around dinner before bedtime. On weekends there's a three hour cap per day and no earlier than noon

I can feel you there, now that school is out, we've been doing it in reverse. They are allowed video games in the morning. Of course it's our rainy season here, so it all goes out the window when it rains all day every few days. We're a little more liberal there when everyone's stuck inside.

Truth be told, we've pretty much dropped gaming on Linux for the kids in my house the last few months. It's a matter of logistics. The only PC is in the bedroom, which requires constant supervision if a kid is up there (logins, steam hassle, sharing, keeping them out of things they shouldn't touch). It's not hard, but compared to pressing a button on the TV to turn on the switch, I can see how consoles win in the convience factor. And we're not sequestering people away in the upstairs bedroom, lol.



Last edited by denyasis on 29 May 2022 at 1:52 pm UTC
x_wing 30 May
Quoting: HerrLangeThx for the new input, Still appreciated.

In the meanwhile I transgressed my own policies and my Kids have now an own steam account even if they are not yet 12.

I did this because a lot of suggestions here required steam. Secondly they are actually hooked on Yu-Gi-Oh! and they wished to play cards (and the computer is cheaper than the real cards ;-) ). So I bought a copy of Yu-Gi-Oh! Legacy of the Duelist for them and they really like it.

My daughter is now 10 years old and my son 8 years old. If yours can read I can recommend Yu-Gi-Oh! Legacy of the Duelist.

But I'm very skeptical regarding the free to play MMOG card games like Yu-Gi-Oh! Master Duell, Haerthstone, etc. So I'm glad that there is still the legacy of real games without pay2win and huge grind requirements. I actually try to explain them that time has a value and such "free to play" games try to take your time and therefore are not really for free.

FYI, Steam has parental controls. You can set a pin and hide the market & social components of your kids accounts.
CatKiller 30 May
Quoting: denyasisTruth be told, we've pretty much dropped gaming on Linux for the kids in my house the last few months. It's a matter of logistics. The only PC is in the bedroom, which requires constant supervision if a kid is up there (logins, steam hassle, sharing, keeping them out of things they shouldn't touch). It's not hard, but compared to pressing a button on the TV to turn on the switch, I can see how consoles win in the convience factor. And we're not sequestering people away in the upstairs bedroom, lol.
It's maybe not an option for everyone, but our computers are in our dining room, in the middle of the house, and the main thoroughfare. The things that happen on them are things that everyone's comfortable with everyone else seeing. And, later, with online interactions with their peers, there won't be the situation of them getting upset alone & vulnerable because there's not going to be any long period of time when mum isn't going to be at least wandering past to make a cuppa.
denyasis 31 May
Quoting: CatKiller
Quoting: denyasisTruth be told, we've pretty much dropped gaming on Linux for the kids in my house the last few months. It's a matter of logistics. The only PC is in the bedroom, which requires constant supervision if a kid is up there (logins, steam hassle, sharing, keeping them out of things they shouldn't touch). It's not hard, but compared to pressing a button on the TV to turn on the switch, I can see how consoles win in the convience factor. And we're not sequestering people away in the upstairs bedroom, lol.
It's maybe not an option for everyone, but our computers are in our dining room, in the middle of the house, and the main thoroughfare. The things that happen on them are things that everyone's comfortable with everyone else seeing. And, later, with online interactions with their peers, there won't be the situation of them getting upset alone & vulnerable because there's not going to be any long period of time when mum isn't going to be at least wandering past to make a cuppa.

Growing up, the family PC was in the living room. I totally agree that having it "in the open" was beneficial. I learned a lot just sitting and watching other family members doing their thing on the PC, from work to gaming.

Either way, it would be nice to have a more accessable/family oriented spot for the PC. I'd like to build a SFF box I can put in the dining room, but that's gonna take some saving for a while, lol.
AngryAnt 31 May
Quoting: CatKiller
Quoting: denyasisTruth be told, we've pretty much dropped gaming on Linux for the kids in my house the last few months. It's a matter of logistics. The only PC is in the bedroom, which requires constant supervision if a kid is up there (logins, steam hassle, sharing, keeping them out of things they shouldn't touch). It's not hard, but compared to pressing a button on the TV to turn on the switch, I can see how consoles win in the convience factor. And we're not sequestering people away in the upstairs bedroom, lol.
It's maybe not an option for everyone, but our computers are in our dining room, in the middle of the house, and the main thoroughfare. The things that happen on them are things that everyone's comfortable with everyone else seeing. And, later, with online interactions with their peers, there won't be the situation of them getting upset alone & vulnerable because there's not going to be any long period of time when mum isn't going to be at least wandering past to make a cuppa.

This is where our compromise with a central gaming machine streaming to potato clients comes in handy (aside from the obvious budget bonus).

For online interactions we make a habit of asking EOD what the online session was like and talk through it. Helps keep an eye on anything potentially building, squashing it early, and establishes that line of comms as natural.
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