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Latest Comments by EagleDelta
FINAL FANTASY VII REMAKE arrives on Steam — plus it's Steam Deck Verified
17 June 2022 at 3:47 pm UTC Likes: 1

Quoting: slaapliedjeAs I grew up on the Ultima series, and never really had a NES, I have not played any of the Final Fantasy games. Even during that era I had a Sega Master System, so Phantasy Star was what I played (though I never did finish it). Finally bought all the FF games the other day on Steam and the first one has been remade and looks like a SNES game, so I suppose I'll have to start with that one, right?

Ultima and FF are drastically different games. While the NES ports of Ultima 3 and 4 look very similar to the FF games, Ultima games are open-world CRPGs ported to a console while FF are largely railway JRPGs. Very very different gameplay in most cases even.

FINAL FANTASY VII REMAKE arrives on Steam — plus it's Steam Deck Verified
17 June 2022 at 3:46 pm UTC

Quoting: damarrin
Quoting: Blender-samaCan someone explain the different FF7 Remake Versions? I didn't follow it closely and I think I read that there will be multiple parts.
There was the Remake on PS4, then, together with the PS5 version they put out a Yuffie episode DLC and these together are the intergrade edition. All this is only the first part of the game; part 2 just got a first trailer, it's called FFVII Rebirth.

Also FFVII Rebirth will also be PS5-exclusive for at least a year, if not longer.

Proton Experimental bumps minimum driver version, more playable on Linux and Steam Deck
13 May 2022 at 2:55 pm UTC Likes: 1

Quoting: t3g
Quoting: damarrin
Quoting: mr-victory
Quoting: damarrinThat version bump is brutal, these are really recent drivers.
Out of curiosity, does Pop have these drivers right now?
IDK about Mesa, but it does have the 510 driver.

Ubuntu 22.04 ships with Mesa 22 and so does Pop 22.04.

Pop is currently shipping with 510.68.02 in 22.04.

To comment on those that are complaining that these requirements are too recent of releases to require, it's good to remember a few things:

1. Proton Experiment is just that, experimental. Generally to use experimental features, you need software/drivers that support those experimental features.
2. Mesa 22.0.3 and NVidia 510.68.02 are the latest stable releases of those drivers. I can't speak for Mesa, but System76 doesn't ship beta NVidia drivers and won't ship stable drivers until they've tested that they work in Pop as expected.
3. In the current era of frequent vulnerabilities and a tech/gaming industry moving fairly fast, staying on an "old" driver because the latest stable is "too new" for a single individual's idea of "stable" is not going to fly. Software/Hardware devs get to decide the minimum required version and being on the latest GFX driver version has been a gaming mainstay for years.

Valve gathering a list of Deck Verified games that have problems
25 March 2022 at 3:12 pm UTC Likes: 3

Quoting: axelbWell, for me Witcher 3 is missing on that list. I get major micro stuttering on PC. No matter if Proton experimental or GE-Proton7-10.

Remember that the Verified status is specifically for the Steam Deck and it's hardware config. Not for general Linux support.

Valve gathering a list of Deck Verified games that have problems
25 March 2022 at 2:35 pm UTC Likes: 2

Quoting: Vortex_AcheronticI even had games listed as "Unsupported" which worked just fine with not a single issues for hours on Deck o.O

Somehow I now think they may associated some reports to the wrong game now reading the article.

It is important to note that Valve has said that if they find a problem with a single feature, even if it is rarely used, then the game will be marked as "Unsupported". "Playable" vs "Verified" is generally tied to things not being optimized for Steam Deck resolution, controller, text size, and other things tied specifically to being optimized for the Deck.

I.E. if a game is playable, but the cutscenes don't work due to Media Foundation, then the game is marked as "Unsupported"

Same applies to a game like Halo: Master Chief Collection, where the Single Player works, but Multiplayer doesn't due to EAC. The entire game has to be playable to be marked as "Playable" and the game has to be optimized for Steam Deck screen/controller/etc to be "Verified".

Tim Sweeney has a point about Fortnite EAC support
11 February 2022 at 4:01 pm UTC

Quoting: Koopacabras
Quoting: EagleDelta
Quoting: Koopacabraswhat I don't get about this whole article... is how does the heck Fortnite for Android works? and I think there's enough android "distros" out there, that have plenty of different kernels. Did google let them run a proprietary module on their kernels?
I'm sorry if my question is too stupid I simply ignore this.

They will detect if you are running with root, or running with an unlocked bootloader, or try to see if you're running a custom ROM and block those things.
that probably can be easily bypassed with MagisK. There's actually nothing preventing me from patching my own kernel and building a custom rom image, with a patched kernel to run on my android device (and running fortnite with full customized kernel). I don't see that being any different from Linux distros, It might be a little more complicated to setup and compile, than lets say installing xanmod or liquorix kernel, but it's totally doable.

Anyway... I think that clearly, they are not relying on a kernel module on android, so all this about GPL incompatibilities with EAC and the kernel is all nonsense.

Besides let's not make it about Linux only tho... I think that probably Apple wouldn't allow a kernel module for anticheat on their kernel, for the obvious security reasons.

In my opinion...this is not about Linux only, Google banned fortnite from their play store, Apple did likewise. So maybe the problem is Epic here. Maybe their app wants unlimited trust, their app needs more permissions and priviliges, than anything out there, so it's getting banned, for security reasons.
And Sweeney is so blinded with greed, that cannot see the Elephant in the room here.

Not sure that will be a thing anymore. Back in August, Magisk said they were dropping support for hiding root from SafetyNet and joined the Android Platform Security Team.

https://www.xda-developers.com/magisk-development-continues-without-magiskhide/

The latest Magisk release from 2 weeks ago no longer contains MagiskHide
EDIT: Looks like that release just copied the release notes from 24.0
https://github.com/topjohnwu/Magisk/releases/tag/v24.1

Tim Sweeney has a point about Fortnite EAC support
11 February 2022 at 4:10 am UTC

Quoting: Koopacabraswhat I don't get about this whole article... is how does the heck Fortnite for Android works? and I think there's enough android "distros" out there, that have plenty of different kernels. Did google let them run a proprietary module on their kernels?
I'm sorry if my question is too stupid I simply ignore this.

They will detect if you are running with root, or running with an unlocked bootloader, or try to see if you're running a custom ROM and block those things.

Tim Sweeney has a point about Fortnite EAC support
10 February 2022 at 10:10 pm UTC Likes: 1

Really the only solution for these developers to get what they want is Cloud gaming. Even on Windows right now some AC is digging in so deep that certain devices get blocked by the AC from being used on Windows (I.E. the driver is blocked by the AC) and in some rarer cases, features critical to a Developer's use of Windows (or even just a power user) has to be disabled to play a game (Search FaceIT and HyperV).

This isn't unique to Linux, the anti-cheat developers want your PC to be more like a Console because they want that sweet PC revenue, but don't want to give up the control Consoles give them.

Tim Sweeney has a point about Fortnite EAC support
10 February 2022 at 7:21 pm UTC Likes: 1

Quoting: Purple Library GuyAll this stuff about whether people should trust a Fortnite on Linux with a kernel anti-cheat module is somewhat beside the point. So, if there were such a Fortnite, the security-conscious people wouldn't buy--um, it's free--wouldn't acquire it. Fine, fair enough.

But that's not important. The issue here is whether people who already play Fortnite on Windows with EAC with kernel-level access, will be able to do the exact same thing on their shiny new Steam Deck where they probably don't keep their sensitive information anyway. Not being able to do that is a disappointment I'm unhappy they will have to have, because it makes the Steam Deck less attractive to them. And if any of those people cared about the arguments people here are making about the dangers of kernel level access for foreign software, they wouldn't be playing Fortnite in the first place.

While they can technically install Windows on the SteamDeck to play Fortnite, the supported software is SteamOS and, as such, no official "support" for EGS was going to be there anyway. This is no different than Switch at launch or any other console at launch with limited software options.

As LTT called it and Gardner Bryant mentioned - the SteamDeck should be seen as a Console pretending to be a PC that respects your right to the hardware ownership than just another PC since it's optimized for a Console-like experience. The only difference is that you can use it as a PC, not that it is meant to be used as one

Tim Sweeney has a point about Fortnite EAC support
9 February 2022 at 9:00 pm UTC Likes: 1

Quoting: a0kamiThis indeed brings the question on future multiplayer games targetting Linux.
We need efficient models/processes/methods to prevent cheating by design in multiplayer games to come.

That may be true, but it sounds like right now, the Linux kernel itself is partially the blocker. Even if a specific kernel version was required, there would need to be additional tweaks added (and accepted) into the kernel to prevent users from running/writing programs that use the BPF VM within the kernel, for example.

That seems intense, but there are a few Windows AntiCheats that also require the user to disable certain Windows features just to use them. FaceIT requires that HyperV be disabled to utilize the anti-cheat in the CS:GO client. Basically that means, no VMs, no Docker, no WSL2, and no Application Isolation when running CS:GO on a server using FaceIT.

Anti-Cheat vendors basically would prefer that PCs running their ACs become console-like in user access