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Latest Comments by wvstolzing
The GoD Unit is a brain-tickling first-person physics puzzle game out now
6 March 2021 at 12:23 am UTC

Looks really interesting; great that it has a demo too.

Quoting: no_information_hereSeeing them bending gravity and light in the trailer was cool. Wishlisted!
(I do miss Portal and Talos.)

Have you played 'DeadCore'? https://store.steampowered.com/app/284460/DeadCore/ it's like a cross between puzzler & speed runner -- and *very* difficult. But it does scratch the portal-like itch a *little* bit.

Also, they're not Linux native, but you might want to check out the 'Qube' games.

Steam Link app now available for the Linux desktop
2 March 2021 at 11:35 pm UTC

Quoting: JuliusFinally!

Edit: arg, seems like x86_64 only. Why Valve? Why? We were able to run a normal Steam Linux client on x86 before :( What is really missing is an Arm64 build of the steam-link :(

Does the Raspberry Pi 4 run arm64 binaries? Maybe they'll release an update for the Rpi version (I mean this: https://support.steampowered.com/kb_article.php?ref=6153-IFGH-6589 ) eventually.

GTA III and Vice City get reverse engineered with a new game engine
20 February 2021 at 12:59 pm UTC

Quoting: dpanter
Quoting: wvstolzingIt requires libglfw3 3.3 min.; while Debian (which I'm currently using, after random nvidia-related f*ckups with Arch that I got fed up with) still has 3.2.1 as of now.
Or... grab libglfw3 3.3.2-1 from testing. 3.3 has been available in Debian repos since July 2019. :)

I eventually built libglfw3 from source; but the build for 'RE' still fails.

... I also confess, that I'm not confident enough to mix stable & non-stable repos on Debian. I use backports & flatpak & appimages & source builds when I need something new.

GTA III and Vice City get reverse engineered with a new game engine
18 February 2021 at 12:24 am UTC

Quoting: LinuxwarperNow add raytracing and it will be even better.

Are they planning to do that? I've seen some pretty nice experiments on youtube, using a different reverse-engineered engine or mod or hack (can't really tell what it is):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fPnw78wJYgc
Adds a pretty nice mood to GTA3, I think. The VC examples aren't as good.

This is the 'engine' in question. It's (partly?) built on Vulkan, so a Linux version could be a possibility:
https://github.com/petrgeorgievsky/gtaRenderHook

GTA III and Vice City get reverse engineered with a new game engine
17 February 2021 at 3:28 pm UTC Likes: 1

Quoting: HoriIt'd be nice if we could use it straight from Steam as a compatibility layer (like Proton).
I think OpenMW can be used this way for Morrowind, IF i'm not mistaken (which I might be)

Not to say it'd be great to have one for San Andreas. The Steam version is pretty buggy unfortunately, so a new engine would be most welcome and probably even better than the retail version.

Brings back memories of trying to play San Andreas at roughly 15fps on my sub-par PC back in 2006.

GTA III and Vice City get reverse engineered with a new game engine
17 February 2021 at 3:26 pm UTC Likes: 2

It requires libglfw3 3.3 min.; while Debian (which I'm currently using, after random nvidia-related f*ckups with Arch that I got fed up with) still has 3.2.1 as of now. I'm too lazy to build glfw3 from source, but I'm really curious as to how this works -- especially the VC port.

Another challenge, of course, is to muster enough energy to get up & pick the GTA CDs from the shelf, copy the contents, etc.

System76 tease shots of their custom Keyboard and release the source code
11 February 2021 at 8:47 pm UTC Likes: 1

Quoting: damarrinI'm way past the mechanical/RGB keyboard stage. Uncomfortable to write on, tacky to look at. I wish them luck and many customers. :-)

RGB is tasteless & annoying as hell, sure; but I strongly disagree that mechanical keyboards are 'uncomfortable' in general. Quite the contrary, actually.

System76 tease shots of their custom Keyboard and release the source code
11 February 2021 at 3:42 pm UTC

Quoting: JanneSize looks perfect. I wonder what switches they use. I'm partial to Topre myself but I guess they're using Cherry or some other maker.

It sounds like the switches will be user swappable; so I'd expect the default models to be customizable as well.

I've been longing for a mechanical keyboard since my Unicomp died on me last year; but good ones are really expensive & usually don't even ship where I live. This Sys76 keyboard is sure to be on the expensive side as well — though I have to say I really like that they're using a solid aluminum chassis.

Linux on the Apple M1 takes another step closer with Ubuntu working thanks to Corellium
21 January 2021 at 3:11 pm UTC

Quoting: KohlyKohl
Quoting: LinasRunning Linux on Apple hardware has always been a quirky endeavor. Every time I try it, there's something uniquely non-stadard and almost compatible, but not quite. Then it would randomly forget which drive is a boot drive, mess up NVRAM, or something else to ruin the day.

In my experience it is just not worth the hassle.

I have Linux running on Apple hardware and it still amazes me how different the experience is depending on the distribution used.

Even something like Ubuntu vs KDE Neon which in theory should be the same somehow isn't.

The particular model also makes a huge difference. I have the notorious 'mid-2007 Mac Mini' that almost drove me mad before I figured out how to install Linux on it -- nowadays it has Debian 10 64 bit on it (& is very useful); but the only way I know how to install it is to start from a patched bootloader & a 32bit Ubuntu 14-something, then upgrade that Ubuntu to a more recent 64 bit version, then use debootstrap to sneakily (?!) place Debian on the disk.

Getting Linux running properly on Apple M1 Silicon has begun with Asahi Linux
8 January 2021 at 8:09 pm UTC

Quoting: kaimanI simply won't buy any of their computers any more. And software wise, things went basically downhill after OSX 10.6.

So yeah, guess there's an argument for getting Linux to run, after all :-).

Yeah I bailed after 10.8; and never looked back. Though the one thing that I sort of do miss from OS X is the ease with which you could make applications message one another, tap into each other's objects, etc. using AppleScript, or even Automator. I've been trying to learn some dbus messaging lately; and the lack of documentation — not to mention the half-assed way in which applications implement its resources (*if at all*) drive me crazy.

I wasn't aware that this new initiative was entirely a matter of reverse engineering, though. That's disheartening, to be honest.