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Latest Comments by Tuxee
Developer of popular noise suppression tool NoiseTorch has dev machine compromised
19 May 2022 at 12:30 pm UTC

Quoting: slaapliedjeThat is a weird, random one to target. This day and age it is no longer paranoia, someone is out to hack you.

Why should this have been a deliberate and targeted attack? I suppose pretty much everyone (more so on Windows machines) can catch malware and become therefore compromised.

Canonical going 'all in' on gaming for Ubuntu, new Steam Snap package in testing
2 May 2022 at 4:32 pm UTC

Quoting: scaineDrives me nuts, just so much hypocrisy.

Spot on. Sorry for pretty much just re-iterating your point in my post a second time.

Canonical going 'all in' on gaming for Ubuntu, new Steam Snap package in testing
2 May 2022 at 4:30 pm UTC Likes: 2

Quoting: slaapliedje
Quoting: scaineWeirdly though, when Canonical do this, suddenly it's "they're not collaborating", or they suffer from "not invented here" syndrome.

Maybe because they are not collaborating? Microsoft has upstreamed more code to the Linux kernel than Canonical has, for example.

U serious? Comparing a company with 180.000 employees to Canonical? Besides, MS pushes upstream whatever fits their very own agenda (which is perfectly fine). And I assume MS commits automatically translate to many lines of code.

QuoteInstead of pushing Wayland forward, they create Mir. When Gnome-shell first started out, instead of adding some coders to the pool, they decided to do their own thing with Unity, etc. They keep claiming they can do it better / faster, when they should have treated these core components as a community and pitched in.

Since Wayland/X11 replaced Mir in 2017 AND the alleged lack of commitment and upstream activity by Canonical: Would it had made ANY difference? And Wayland way is still NOT the default protocol/server/compositor on many distributions.
As far as Gnome Shell goes: Are you equally vocal towards the Cinammon developers? Or pretty much all other DEs out there aside from maybe Gnome and KDE? Gnome Shell had it's initial release in April 2011, Unity about one year earlier. So why should Canonical have abandoned it? Why did everyone "embrace" the Red Hat alternative (apart from the Cinnamon and MATE people)? (Do I get the "t'was the licensing" answer?)

QuoteBut instead all they do is divide people.

No. Actually not. I'd say the majority of Linux users don't give a shit. I never felt the urge to pop up in some Red Hat/Fedora forums and bash away at flatpak. I use whatever I consider useful (and which gets its fair share of support) - and I hope I share this sentiment with most other Linux users. BTW: Did you blame Red Hat for "dividing people" because of systemd? Are the people behind Cinnamon dividing people?
Just to be clear: I really couldn't care less, what DEs, packaging system, init system, file system, whatever people use. Hell, I even talk to Windows folk. But whenever Canonical "intends to do something" (let alone does something) people get all mad as if their very existence depends on a distribution they presumably don't even use. That's just... tiring.

Canonical going 'all in' on gaming for Ubuntu, new Steam Snap package in testing
1 May 2022 at 12:00 pm UTC Likes: 8

Quoting: 3zekielWhy, oh why ... The flatpak'd steam has been around for a couple years already, with flatpak 1.11 and up it is now fully usable, so why would they go and add their snap now ? Why not just update their flatpak in base distro, and use that ? SteamOS/Steam deck is also going all in on flatpak. So why can´t they just learn to give up ? They iterated over and over again in that canonical cycle (upstart, unity ...)
 
while(is_alive(canonical))
{
    do_somthing_on_our_own(rand());
    try_to_shove_it_everywhere();
    see_that_everyone_else_is_using_smthg_else();
    push_on();
    give_up();
    leave_an_ugly_mess_for_others_to_clean_up();
}

Maybe it would be time to break out of that loop.

You should be more precise: upstart was introduced by Canonical in 2006 - years before systemd was even a thing. At some point even Fedora used it.
Snap intends to do (quite) the same thing as flatpak but has its advantages and disadvantages. And snap is Canonical's thing. Just as quite a few other technologies are Red Hat's thing (though Lennart Poettering frequently takes the blame and not his employee). Snap was introduced in 2015/2016 pretty much at exactly the same time as flatpak. The situation is NOT that there was flatpak and THEN Canonical decided to do their own thing. It has been pretty much the same situation with Mir vs. Wayland or Unity vs. Gnome Shell. (Also I am not aware who these others are, who have to clean up the mess - when they ditched Unity... there was nothing to "clean up".) Also: These decisions are obviously not rand(), but they seem to address pressing problems. Because otherwise there wouldn't be competing solutions emerging at pretty much the same time.

I wonder how ppl would have dealt with the deb-vs-rpm situation if social media would have been a thing back in the days...

Canonical going 'all in' on gaming for Ubuntu, new Steam Snap package in testing
30 April 2022 at 2:22 pm UTC

Quoting: Boldos
Quoting: TuxeeProbably those days, when games occupied megabytes. Not 50+ gigabytes. I agree that for small applications the overhead of flatpaks or snaps is sometimes ginormous - OTOH something like KiCad is huge already and the flatpak overhead is no longer relevant, same goes for the blender snap.
I quite disagree. The flatpack thing, with just a couple of small basic packages installed, takes GBs of root space. This drives me totally nuts.

That's pretty much what I said, no?

Right now I have only one small tool installed as flatpak: the Gnome Extension Manager - which is only half the size of the .deb install (which pulls in two dependencies) BUT relies on the Gnome Platform which eats up a measly 750MB. OTOH KiCad itself already takes 600+ MB and its libraries around 6GB. The 500MB of runtime barely matter - even less so since it is shared with Hugin. Consequentially the more flatpaks (or snaps for that matter) you'd install the less this overhead would be.

Canonical going 'all in' on gaming for Ubuntu, new Steam Snap package in testing
29 April 2022 at 7:45 pm UTC

Quoting: Breizh
Quoting: scaineThat's a great turnaround from a few years ago, when the threatened removal of 32-bit libraries would have crippled the O/S from a gaming perspective.

A better gaming experience in what is still an incredibly popular "entry" distro is superb news.

When was it? Even Arch, who was one of the first distro to drop 32-bits support, still have 32-bits libraries (but in a repository that have to be activated explicitly), and is really good for gaming (well, even Valve is using it for SteamOS…).

About 3 years ago. https://www.omgubuntu.co.uk/2019/06/ubuntu-is-dropping-all-32-bit-support-going-forward
Valve itself might be less of an issue, but the games themselves rely on 32 bit support.

Canonical going 'all in' on gaming for Ubuntu, new Steam Snap package in testing
29 April 2022 at 7:42 pm UTC Likes: 4

Quoting: jpThere is no goal, it's just laziness and illiteracy of developers, who for the most part don't know how to write pure code, they have flooded Linux devcommunity.

And you are...? You have to be some serious developer for such... bold statements.

Quoting: jpAt the same time, all these snaps/flatpaks etc (shhh, systemd) are complicated and unsafe, although it is useful for someone to have legitimate backdoors.
Welcome to World with New order created by corporations and approved by new Linux generation.

Care to elaborate? We are really short on conspiracy theories round here.

Canonical going 'all in' on gaming for Ubuntu, new Steam Snap package in testing
29 April 2022 at 7:37 pm UTC Likes: 2

Quoting: SchattenspiegelRemember the time basically every major application had a .deb package available and most the disk space was available for games and data and stuff, because applications where small and started nearly instantly and... actually...worked...?

Probably those days, when games occupied megabytes. Not 50+ gigabytes. I agree that for small applications the overhead of flatpaks or snaps is sometimes ginormous - OTOH something like KiCad is huge already and the flatpak overhead is no longer relevant, same goes for the blender snap.
Few years ago a fair bunch of my proprietary/commercial software came as archives - compared to that appimages and snaps are a blessing.

Sorry Arch (EndeavourOS), it's not working out any more and hello Fedora
11 April 2022 at 9:30 am UTC

Quoting: Guest
Quoting: TuxeeI did a benchmark. But you claimed it to "be fake", because it didn't meet your... well, expectations. But indeed I do few benchmarks, I prefer to work (or game) on my machine. And if "absolute browser speed" would be my thing, I'd probably use Chromium. Even the snap version is faster by quite a margin in these benchmarks than any version of Firefox.
I just have a hard time believing your result, because it doesn't match the motionmark result of the two articles, where motionmark is getting significantly slower on the Snap packages.

Sigh. Whatever...

Quoting: GuestI have already given three links where people talk about incredibly bad results of the Snap packages. Here are two other
If I have time, I'm going to do some extensive benchmarks myself and compare these Snap apps on Ubuntu with the performance of the exact same apps in Debian and Arch Linux. I'm probably going to make some unprecedented discoveries.

Don Quixote rides again...
Just a heads up: Comparing the same browser on different distributions will be completely pointless.

https://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=article&item=linux-distros-50cpu&num=2


Quoting: GuestRegarding Firefox, this is my result in Speedometer 2.0 with a very old i3-3240 and without a dedicated GPU on FreeBSD: https://i.ibb.co/tJTnbZq/Screenshot-2022-03-25-14-57-10.png
And I get this result in Chromium on the same system: https://i.ibb.co/9vkMVg6/Screenshot-2022-03-25-10-38-48.png

So the difference is 4.94% in FreeBSD. Speedometer is seen by both the Firefox team and the Chromium development team as the benchmark that has the most relevance in reality.

I can probably make Firefox go as fast as Chromium on FreeBSD: https://firefox-source-docs.mozilla.org/build/buildsystem/pgo.html

You can ask yourself, why is Firefox on my Linux system so much slower than Chromium, when Firefox is almost as fast as Chromium for people who use FreeBSD, and why is Chromium also faster on FreeBSD than on my Linux system?

No. I won't. I am definitely not inclined to choose FreeBSD as my OS of choice because some random dude on a mission suggested that Firefox might then run just as fast as Chromium. It has been said before: This site is about gaming on Linux.
Why not head over to Phoronix, where benchmarking is king and FreeBSD gets its fair share of attention. However, the results there are still bleak.

Sorry Arch (EndeavourOS), it's not working out any more and hello Fedora
10 April 2022 at 8:27 pm UTC

Quoting: GuestIt is telling that Ubuntu users do so few benchmarks, that they do not yet have the slightest knowledge whether it is 15%-10%-5% slower or faster than deb packages in the current implementation.

I did a benchmark. But you claimed it to "be fake", because it didn't meet your... well, expectations. But indeed I do few benchmarks, I prefer to work (or game) on my machine. And if "absolute browser speed" would be my thing, I'd probably use Chromium. Even the snap version is faster by quite a margin in these benchmarks than any version of Firefox.