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Latest Comments by buenaventura
A general guide for the best practices of buying Linux games
6 October 2016 at 9:31 am UTC Likes: 2

Quoting: lvlarkWell then, I'll touch both. Both sides follow human nature in always wanting more and not wanting to give away what they have (maybe some will find these things easier than others, within either side). Both sides should try to learn to be satisfied easier.

Sure, that is one way of thinking of "human nature". That stuff is very academic and very complex so probably we should not dwell there.

Quoting: lvlarkAnd as to the equalisation debate you're hinting at (which is a far broader political discussion): Most civilised countries have that to some extent. When it comes to digital media, as I've alluded to, there's plenty of free things out there. So it's not a matter of making sure average/poor people have enough digital media to have some entertainment need covered, because there's already ways to cover that. Expanding and providing easier access to those free options is something that could be worked on.

I am hinting at a debate, but I do not really want to engage in it here (as you say, it is pretty pointless eh?). The specific issue of Liams article (which I liked, except for the moralizing part), is however possible to debate here.

I thought of another analogy/connection: Patreon. That is a system for people to be able to support for example Liam and get some (semi-nominal) benefits; as soon as I get rich, I will surely contribute there, more than 10 dollars even! However, we would not want him to require say 10 dollars to view GoL at all, would we? Similarly, one can discuss games and game pricing systems. Now I must eat.

A general guide for the best practices of buying Linux games
6 October 2016 at 9:14 am UTC Likes: 4

Quoting: ColomboRight. Communists. Why should rich people have games? Lets take games from everyone! They everyone will be equal!

That is not helpful, just trolly. If my sentiments are communist, then I guess libraries and humble bundles alike should be considered communist. In any case, we are still talking concretely about a rather specific issue, and should not be trolled into scream-fest ideological battles.

Edit: (I do love the edit button): And the issue is, in the interest of
1. fairness (fair access to culture, spec. games)
2. supporting gaming on linux
is it relevant/fair to chide poor people for not paying full premium for (linux) games, while ignoring rich peoples lackluster contribution?

A general guide for the best practices of buying Linux games
6 October 2016 at 9:03 am UTC Likes: 1

Quoting: lvlark
Quoting: buenaventurathe issue of rich people not paying more is not included at all (when that issue is probably (in raw cash) a lot bigger).

That is an issue I'm not touching with a ten foot pole. At least, not on any internet forum, not even GOL's.

Well then I guess you shouldn't touch the inverse either :P

Edit: that is, why is it OK to rant about average people not paying full (or sale) price for a game, but not to rant about rich people not paying a lot more than full price? Especially when the latter problem is, as said, in cash terms likely a lot bigger.

A general guide for the best practices of buying Linux games
6 October 2016 at 8:52 am UTC Likes: 3

Quoting: Eike
Quoting: buenaventuraI'm not the one who started the debate about philosophy/morality, was I?

I honestly think we should stop that part of the discussion here. We won't solve this problem. :)

No I agree, we wont of course :P The central critizism of the article I have, (as I edited in after realizing that my comment was vague), is the focus on poor people paying to little for games, while the issue of rich people not paying more is not included at all (when that issue is probably (in raw cash) a lot bigger).

Edit: actually the Humble Bundle is pretty good at illustrating this - there, rich people ARE able to pay extra (alot actually) to support developers. Such systems could be expanded.

A general guide for the best practices of buying Linux games
6 October 2016 at 8:49 am UTC Likes: 3

Quoting: lvlarkAs Liam said, it's a matter of having the people that develop those 'common goods' get paid. They aren't paid out of common funds, are they?

No, and that is too bad. Although, some are (there are for example, in my country, state and regional/local funds for supporting small game developers, musicians, authors, poets etc.). And libraries, they are generally funded (at least here) by common funds. It is not a very big stretch to imagine such systems enlarged and empowered.

A general guide for the best practices of buying Linux games
6 October 2016 at 8:43 am UTC Likes: 3

Quoting: liamdaweOffensive to pay private entities? How are developers supposed to survive exactly? Pay them in exposure, a handshake? Be realistic. This is the world we live on, money driven, let's not get carried away with star trek visions of a no money future.

I'm not the one who started the debate about philosophy/morality, was I? When talking about morality or ideas, blaming your bias on "that's just how it is today" is limiting. Sure, a developer will not (in fact) get any money immediately if I buy from g2a, that is just a fact.

However, whether it is RIGHT to buy something from g2a (and thus whether you can critisize someone morally for doing so) depends on your idea of fairness or justice or morality, not on how it is today. You started the moralizing, I'm just moralizing back.

Edit: what I am trying to say is, essentially, it is unjust to blame poor people for buying cheap games/pirating, when at least as much blame (if not alot more) should be put on rich people not paying extra.

A general guide for the best practices of buying Linux games
6 October 2016 at 8:36 am UTC Likes: 3

Quoting: liamdawe
Quoting: kingofrodeoI just wanted to say this:
I own about 300 games for Linux on Steam and about 50 more on GOG. I only buy and play games on my Linux machine (the only pne I own other than am Android tablet). Currently I can afford to buy games... hell I even buy games I know I won't play.
I used to pirate when I was young and poor, and that's why nowadays I like to support many developers even though I have little time to play. I don't feel ashamed really. What was I supposed to do? All my friends were playing with the cool stuff, so should I be looking at my room's white walls just for the sake of it?
Sure, if you can afford but pirate or buy stolen keys then you're a prick.
Rather than pirating games or staring at white walls, there are so many other things people can do. This is again entitlement issues. So your friends were playing games, which must mean you should too right? That's childrens false logic.

Well, why should certain kids have a wider choice than others? Surely the best way to distribute cultural goods is by asking people what they want - it is a matter of taste, after all. Their choice should not be limited by income, gender, nationality, religion etc. If there are physical limitations (like not enough people fitting in an concert) that is something to think about, however with digital copies of games, there should be no problem.

A general guide for the best practices of buying Linux games
6 October 2016 at 8:27 am UTC Likes: 2

Quoting: Beamboom
Quoting: emphy
Quoteyou’re not entitled to anything.

Sorry, but this is extremely offensive. Blocking off people from cultural activities because of their financial situation or location is simply wrong.

Why? It costs 60-80 USD - often more - to go to the most popular concerts today. By far no all can afford that. Is that offensive too? Or the movies. Or theatres. They all cost, and for many it's too much. Is that wrong? Do they have the moral rights to break into these arenas if they can't afford the admission fee?

I could go on. TV channels, streaming services, DVDs, you're not entitled to any of these offerings. But with video games it's different? Get out of here. Real life doesn't work that way.

Why yes, I would say it is quite offensive that we have to pay private entities lots of money for what could/should be seen as common goods, such as culture, especially when there is no scarcity (you can make infinite digital copies of a game). It is strange, that people consider it "just so" that people should be discriminated based on income, yet balk at discriminating them based on skin color or gender.

I guess you have nothing against DRM and such, so why not make technology recognize your income and take a fair share as a price for games/video/whatev. That would be cool.

A general guide for the best practices of buying Linux games
6 October 2016 at 7:59 am UTC

Quoting: kingofrodeoSure, if you can afford but pirate or buy stolen keys then you're a prick.

Hear hear!

A general guide for the best practices of buying Linux games
6 October 2016 at 7:55 am UTC Likes: 2

About entitlement, most would agree that I am entitled (as a human being) to food, shelter, and meaningful cultural participation in society. It should not be based on income. If anything, there is no right to extreme excesses of income, and thus I think we should make culture, food and housing free for everyone, paid for by cutting of any income above say 5000 dollars per month and spending the excess on those common needs (also known as tax).

Thus, anyone with a substantial excess income, do pay for ye games. Anyone without, in the meantime (until justice prevails and it is free for all), do what you must to participate culturally in society, and taketh no shiet from the rich kids.

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