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Latest Comments by rustybroomhandle
Take-Two Interactive hit the DMCA nuke on GTA III and Vice City reverse engineered effort
22 February 2021 at 3:17 pm UTC Likes: 2

This is a weird one. I might be talking out my ass here, but DMCA is for copyright, and as far as I know, reverse engineered efforts like this usually do not use any of the original code and you still need to buy the original game for the assets. So it does not violate any copyright.

Remember when Microsoft tried to legally poopoo* the Samba project, but then later agreed to help them by providing spec docs?

* not a legal term

D3D9, D3D10 and D3D11 to Vulkan translation layer DXVK 1.8 is out now
19 February 2021 at 2:37 pm UTC Likes: 2

vkd3d-proton 2.2 also coming very soon, with Cyberpunk GPU hang fixes (maybe, more testing required)

EDIT: it has been released

Stadia to see more than 100 games through 2021
14 February 2021 at 7:27 am UTC Likes: 1

Quoting: mirvChill out dude/dudette.

You are still being useless troll.

I will quote myself also:

Quoting: rustybroomhandle"When Proton does get marketed to developers it will be in the form of a feature complete build target. ie "Here, support this, ktnx"

Quoting: rustybroomhandleI also said that Valve would probably present it as a solution to developers once it's in a complete enough state. I have no feelings about this either way.

These two quotes of mine say the same thing. You literally made 0 argument and have not answered my question asking how Microsoft takes control away from a Linux user that plays Windows games using Proton.

I'm not speaking to you any more. I'd have more meaningful discussion with an infected boil.

Stadia to see more than 100 games through 2021
13 February 2021 at 10:34 pm UTC Likes: 1

Mirv. Learn to read.

I never declared proton "the way forward for Linux gaming". I said it removes a barrier to entry for new users.

I also said that Valve would probably present it as a solution to developers once it's in a complete enough state. I have no feelings about this either way.

At no point in this did I say devs should just support Proton.

You are trying to put words in my mouth and you are coming off as the worst kind of troll. Not worth speaking to. Chill pill my ass.

Stadia to see more than 100 games through 2021
13 February 2021 at 9:01 pm UTC Likes: 2

Quoting: mirv
Quoting: rustybroomhandle
Quoting: mirv
Quoting: rustybroomhandle
Quoting: mirv
Quoting: rustybroomhandle
Quoting: mirv
Quoting: rustybroomhandle
Quoting: mirvOnly doing what Microsoft say (and ultimately, that's what "Proton" is) is really unhealthy for GNU/Linux. If nothing else, Stadia pushed Vulkan development into far more big budget developer hands than anything from Valve. Something to bear in mind.

Barriers to entry is bad for Linux adoption. And "can't play your games that you paid for" is a barrier to entry. So nah, Proton may be bad for some things, but the reason you don't have many big name games supported on Linux is due to how tiny the market is.

At what point though does removing barriers to entry overtake and remove everything GNU/Linux stands for though? If it's going to be just like Windows, and dictated by Microsoft, then market share won't grow because everyone will just use Windows instead.

And the real reason is not that there's a tiny market, it's more that nobody has come up with a way to make it into a larger market. Something needs to drive the market to grow, something that isn't already being provided. Google didn't wait for a massive game streaming market to exist and then create Stadia, Apple never waited for smartphones or tablets to be widespread before making their own offerings.

If you're going to talk about "everything GNU/Linux stands for" then I assume you only play open source games, yes?

GNU/Linux stands for open, choice, the user being in control. Accessible to everyone. I write GNU/Linux out of respect to GNU components making up so much of the OS and it not just being a kernel (Linux). Having the ability for the user to decide what happens on their own machine is the idea - and if the user decides to run proprietary software, then that's part of it.

Towing Microsoft's line is not a part of that.

I don't see how having the option to run Windows software is toeing the line for Microsoft. If anything it's taking away the need to buy their operating system to run this stuff. Also, running Windows games, native games, Stadia games, open-source games, closed source games, GNU, MIT, whatever, is already a choice the user has. I don't see how working to make any of the above things work better is taking away the user's control. Sounds to me like you are the one wanting to take people's freedom of choice away by shaming it away from them.

Trying to reword yourself?
I'm commenting on suggestions of "Proton" being the way forward as being just walking blindly into Microsoft's control. Sounds to me like you are the one wanting to have that.

No, Proton is NOT the way to walking into Microsoft's control. What does Microsoft control here exactly? And if Microsoft completely stops supporting Windows or phasing it out or the company liquidates or anything, Proton-supported games will continue to work because they are running on top of an open source runtime layer. You don't have a valid argument. I'm not even sure you know what you are arguing here.

Wait....do you actually know what "Proton" is? I mean, that's possibly an invalid assumption I've been making.

Dude, you are not arguing in good faith at all. Of course I know what Proton is. I still want to know what control Microsoft is exerting over the user here. You have a choice not to run ANY Windows software if you choose not to. Proton is not taking any choice away from the user, it's adding choice. Your arguments are getting more and more antagonistic and ad hominem without actually adding anything new or useful tot he discussion.

Stadia to see more than 100 games through 2021
13 February 2021 at 7:59 pm UTC Likes: 1

Quoting: mirv
Quoting: rustybroomhandle
Quoting: mirv
Quoting: rustybroomhandle
Quoting: mirv
Quoting: rustybroomhandle
Quoting: mirvOnly doing what Microsoft say (and ultimately, that's what "Proton" is) is really unhealthy for GNU/Linux. If nothing else, Stadia pushed Vulkan development into far more big budget developer hands than anything from Valve. Something to bear in mind.

Barriers to entry is bad for Linux adoption. And "can't play your games that you paid for" is a barrier to entry. So nah, Proton may be bad for some things, but the reason you don't have many big name games supported on Linux is due to how tiny the market is.

At what point though does removing barriers to entry overtake and remove everything GNU/Linux stands for though? If it's going to be just like Windows, and dictated by Microsoft, then market share won't grow because everyone will just use Windows instead.

And the real reason is not that there's a tiny market, it's more that nobody has come up with a way to make it into a larger market. Something needs to drive the market to grow, something that isn't already being provided. Google didn't wait for a massive game streaming market to exist and then create Stadia, Apple never waited for smartphones or tablets to be widespread before making their own offerings.

If you're going to talk about "everything GNU/Linux stands for" then I assume you only play open source games, yes?

GNU/Linux stands for open, choice, the user being in control. Accessible to everyone. I write GNU/Linux out of respect to GNU components making up so much of the OS and it not just being a kernel (Linux). Having the ability for the user to decide what happens on their own machine is the idea - and if the user decides to run proprietary software, then that's part of it.

Towing Microsoft's line is not a part of that.

I don't see how having the option to run Windows software is toeing the line for Microsoft. If anything it's taking away the need to buy their operating system to run this stuff. Also, running Windows games, native games, Stadia games, open-source games, closed source games, GNU, MIT, whatever, is already a choice the user has. I don't see how working to make any of the above things work better is taking away the user's control. Sounds to me like you are the one wanting to take people's freedom of choice away by shaming it away from them.

Trying to reword yourself?
I'm commenting on suggestions of "Proton" being the way forward as being just walking blindly into Microsoft's control. Sounds to me like you are the one wanting to have that.

No, Proton is NOT the way to walking into Microsoft's control. What does Microsoft control here exactly? And if Microsoft completely stops supporting Windows or phasing it out or the company liquidates or anything, Proton-supported games will continue to work because they are running on top of an open source runtime layer. You don't have a valid argument. I'm not even sure you know what you are arguing here.

Stadia to see more than 100 games through 2021
13 February 2021 at 7:49 pm UTC Likes: 2

Quoting: mirv
Quoting: rustybroomhandle
Quoting: mirv
Quoting: rustybroomhandle
Quoting: mirvOnly doing what Microsoft say (and ultimately, that's what "Proton" is) is really unhealthy for GNU/Linux. If nothing else, Stadia pushed Vulkan development into far more big budget developer hands than anything from Valve. Something to bear in mind.

Barriers to entry is bad for Linux adoption. And "can't play your games that you paid for" is a barrier to entry. So nah, Proton may be bad for some things, but the reason you don't have many big name games supported on Linux is due to how tiny the market is.

At what point though does removing barriers to entry overtake and remove everything GNU/Linux stands for though? If it's going to be just like Windows, and dictated by Microsoft, then market share won't grow because everyone will just use Windows instead.

And the real reason is not that there's a tiny market, it's more that nobody has come up with a way to make it into a larger market. Something needs to drive the market to grow, something that isn't already being provided. Google didn't wait for a massive game streaming market to exist and then create Stadia, Apple never waited for smartphones or tablets to be widespread before making their own offerings.

If you're going to talk about "everything GNU/Linux stands for" then I assume you only play open source games, yes?

GNU/Linux stands for open, choice, the user being in control. Accessible to everyone. I write GNU/Linux out of respect to GNU components making up so much of the OS and it not just being a kernel (Linux). Having the ability for the user to decide what happens on their own machine is the idea - and if the user decides to run proprietary software, then that's part of it.

Towing Microsoft's line is not a part of that.

I don't see how having the option to run Windows software is toeing the line for Microsoft. If anything it's taking away the need to buy their operating system to run this stuff. Also, running Windows games, native games, Stadia games, open-source games, closed source games, GNU, MIT, whatever, is already a choice the user has. I don't see how working to make any of the above things work better is taking away the user's control. Sounds to me like you are the one wanting to take people's freedom of choice away by shaming it away from them.

Stadia to see more than 100 games through 2021
13 February 2021 at 7:03 pm UTC Likes: 2

Quoting: mirv
Quoting: rustybroomhandle
Quoting: mirvOnly doing what Microsoft say (and ultimately, that's what "Proton" is) is really unhealthy for GNU/Linux. If nothing else, Stadia pushed Vulkan development into far more big budget developer hands than anything from Valve. Something to bear in mind.

Barriers to entry is bad for Linux adoption. And "can't play your games that you paid for" is a barrier to entry. So nah, Proton may be bad for some things, but the reason you don't have many big name games supported on Linux is due to how tiny the market is.

At what point though does removing barriers to entry overtake and remove everything GNU/Linux stands for though? If it's going to be just like Windows, and dictated by Microsoft, then market share won't grow because everyone will just use Windows instead.

And the real reason is not that there's a tiny market, it's more that nobody has come up with a way to make it into a larger market. Something needs to drive the market to grow, something that isn't already being provided. Google didn't wait for a massive game streaming market to exist and then create Stadia, Apple never waited for smartphones or tablets to be widespread before making their own offerings.

If you're going to talk about "everything GNU/Linux stands for" then I assume you only play open source games, yes?

Stadia to see more than 100 games through 2021
13 February 2021 at 5:25 pm UTC

Quoting: mirvOnly doing what Microsoft say (and ultimately, that's what "Proton" is) is really unhealthy for GNU/Linux. If nothing else, Stadia pushed Vulkan development into far more big budget developer hands than anything from Valve. Something to bear in mind.

Barriers to entry is bad for Linux adoption. And "can't play your games that you paid for" is a barrier to entry. So nah, Proton may be bad for some things, but the reason you don't have many big name games supported on Linux is due to how tiny the market is.

Stadia to see more than 100 games through 2021
13 February 2021 at 5:08 pm UTC Likes: 1

QuoteWeird way to sign off your post, didn't in any way suggest you were ... and people say I can be quite blunt? Heh.

Sounded patronising. Anyhoo (insert some tone-clarifying emoji here because internet and I'm old)

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