Check out our Monthly Survey Page to see what our users are running.

New World Interactive have released a news post going over the state of Insurgency: Sandstorm, along with announcing a bunch of features no longer being made.

To cut right to the chase here's what's not going to be added into Insurgency: Sandstorm:

  • Story mode/Campaign
  • Mac Support
  • Linux Support
  • Local Play on PvP modes
  • Weapons on Back
  • New foregrip upgrade options

Why? Apparently nothing in that list makes "business sense". They did expand on this a little:

We did not take this decision-making process lightly; all nominated cuts have been reviewed, re-reviewed, and discussed numerous times internally. At the end of these discussions, our criteria came down to “Does this proposed content present a reasonable business case in exchange for the additional development time required to deliver these features?” and in these cases, the answer was “No.” We recognize that these were things that, at some point or another, were promised by the studio, and we apologize for mismanaging expectations. Moving forward, we will be more deliberate in our messaging and our commitments to our players. We’ve grown a lot with Insurgency: Sandstorm, and we’ve learned a lot throughout that process. These lessons will make up our future projects going forward.

New World Interactive

This is a real shame, after Insurgency: Sandstorm was originally announced back in 2016 with Linux support and a story mode it really did look exciting but New World Interactive gradually cut back on what it would contain. Still, we patiently waited only to be repeatedly let down here.

In August last year Linux was planned in the first couple updates, moving into January this year they said they were working on it and hoped to have it out this year, then in May this year they still claimed they were "committed" to Linux and macOS and then again in June they said they would likely push out a Beta version first which would happen next year. Now it's not happening at all—ouch.

Of course, this is a reminder not to buy a game before it lands on Linux. Especially a multiplayer title that relies on anti-cheat. Even if you're perfectly fine using Steam Play/Proton for everything, anti-cheat support is still likely a long way off. Support developers that support the platform. Spend your monies wisely.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
Tags: FPS, Steam
20 Likes, Who?
We do often include affiliate links to earn us some pennies. We are currently affiliated with GOG, Humble Store and Paradox Interactive. See more here.
About the author -
author picture
I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly.
See more from me
68 comments
Page: «5/7»
  Go to:

Purple Library Guy 10 December 2019 at 6:59 pm UTC
SwiftpawPushing Linux games with Linux support = growth. Pushing Windows gaming = recession. We grew because of Valve and other devs, but now we're in a recession because of Valve no longer encouraging developers to support Linux gaming and instead providing them with ways in which they can avoid doing so.
This is wishful thinking. The brute fact is that our current market share is not enough to encourage native ports even if we all buy only native Linux games. And Valve asking people to is also not enough. There was a big burst of interest in native ports related to the Steam Machine, which has been gradually losing . . . ah . . . steam ever since. We are in a chicken-egg situation, and the only way out is an increase in Linux desktop(ish) use, either independent of games or due to some market share shock like a successful Steam Machine.

In theory, things like Proton could make things even worse, but I have seen no particular inflection point where after Proton became viable there was a sudden increase in the downward trend. I myself have never actually used Proton and used Wine for exactly one game, but the strategy associated with Proton is clear and reasonable: Drop the barrier to using Linux low enough that uptake will increase, resulting in more reason to do native ports in the long term. Whether it will actually work is another question, but emphasizing native games has been proved not to work. Insisting on native games would also be a reasonable strategy, if our market share were significantly larger. Unfortunately, it isn't.

The only thing that could make insisting on native games a workable strategy for Linux gamers at 1% market share would be if it was combined with a successful developer push to make Linux an incredibly easy development platform so that it actually definitively cost less than 1% to release for Linux. So like if you used a game engine like Unity or Godot it really would be almost clicking the Linux button, and there was a sort of standard Linux gaming environment you could aim for, whether by saying "Just targeting Steam Linux" or via a standardized Flatpak to stick games in or something, so that complaints about Linux support and such basically evaporated. I'm not at all sure this is plausible, although as far as I can tell the costs of releasing on Linux are way lower than they used to be and it's just continuing to drop; there are developers working on lowering that barrier. But 1% is, like, really low--how do you push costs that low for releasing on a whole platform? If we were at 5% we'd have a way, way better case.

So yeah. Bigger market share is our only hope. If Proton can help get us that, it will be worth any dilution in our purchasing power for native games. If it can't and nothing else happens, we're probably doomed anyway.

Right now, the only thing I see actually doing anything that resembles increasing Linux desktop share is . . . not my favourite thing to see doing that. Specifically, I see Google's Chromebooks, which are now going to be able to run Google's Stadia games. If ChromeOS was going to move past its little niche it was going to need to be able to run games. Typical of Google that they found a way which wouldn't require them to un-cripple the little buggers.
Swiftpaw 10 December 2019 at 7:02 pm UTC
Guest
LibertyPaulMIf we want to attract gamers to linux we need to ensure they won't lose access to the games they already have otherwise our user base will always be low and developers will by and large ignore us.
And by doing this, we ensure that Linux will always be a second-class citizen. I (and many others) said this from the very beginning. If you make it so easy for Windows games to run in Linux but not be natively ported, then of course the game companies will take advantage of that. How can this have any other outcome? Of course they are going to take the path of least resistance. That anyone can think otherwise astounds me.

Again, it's exactly like the OS/2 vs. Windows situation. OS/2 made running Windows apps a priority, often touting that it runs Windows apps better than Microsoft itself. So the potential developer looks at the situation and says "Why develop specifically for OS/2, when we can just develop for Windows and 'kill two birds with one stone?'". Now where is OS/2, and where is Windows? It's painfully obvious that history is repeating itself here.

I think Proton is an excellent technical achievement, and would be great if it was used only to get old Windows games running. But lets not kid ourselves; it helps gamers that are currently using Linux, but it isn't advancing Linux gaming. It's in fact doing the opposite.

Wow, I didn't know that about OS/2. Always fun to find historical examples proving your point.

Capitalism trends towards monopolies, not only for more power and money, but also because monopolies are the most efficient way to do things usually. Governments/socialism/communism trend towards monopolies too because of that same reason, efficiency. What do you think is going to happen when a "private good" that isn't controlled by the public and which only cares about making money is allowed to become the monopoly? Bad things, like spyware, price gouging, advertising, and all manner of other shinaniganery. Ooo my new favorite word.

The point is, like you said, Windows should never become the de-facto standard, not for games or anything else. Breaking developers out of that bubble and pushing them to support a socialized open OS standard like Linux is good for everyone, but helping run Windows programs on Linux just encourages more Windows programs and fewer Linux ones. It moves us away from the solution.

Again, Linux gaming really was blowing up there for a while and we were getting a lot of big games as well as indies, but after Valve started pushing Windows gaming onto Linux, now it's just a tiny trickle of big games, and feels like even the indy titles have slowed down.

I'll be releasing new numbers hopefully sometime soon proving this, too.
BielFPs 10 December 2019 at 7:18 pm UTC
Comments here derailed so much from the article that I thought it was Phoronix
mirv 10 December 2019 at 7:20 pm UTC
View PC info
  • Supporter
  • Top Supporter
Wine has its place. Mostly for older games in my opinion, but it has its place. Trying to tell people that it's bad because it runs Windows software is....a little odd. It's encouraged people I know to actually move away from Windows, because that one application that they needed can now be run from within GNU/Linux.

I recall a bit of concern (my own included) when VP first released their titles. That concern turned out to be entirely unfounded. There have also been multiple games released via GOG that bundle Wine to get the game running. What matters is that the game is _supported_. The ability to run an unsupported game is just a benefit, so long as people know that if it doesn't work, then their money is basically wasted.
And yes, I also know people who would like to play certain games, but no longer can from within Windows itself. Wine bypasses that problem (and actually I've had to use it even for supported GNU/Linux native games too, which otherwise no longer run on my system).

So Wine, and anything based on it, has its place.

You know what would grow demand? Seeing money coming in from day one releases. Vote with your wallet, buy a supported game (it'll be proprietary blobs, so who cares how it runs, so long as it's GNU/Linux supported), and the rest will tend to itself.
Swiftpaw 10 December 2019 at 7:26 pm UTC
mirvWine has its place. Mostly for older games in my opinion, but it has its place. Trying to tell people that it's bad because it runs Windows software is....a little odd. It's encouraged people I know to actually move away from Windows, because that one application that they needed can now be run from within GNU/Linux.

I recall a bit of concern (my own included) when VP first released their titles. That concern turned out to be entirely unfounded. There have also been multiple games released via GOG that bundle Wine to get the game running. What matters is that the game is _supported_. The ability to run an unsupported game is just a benefit, so long as people know that if it doesn't work, then their money is basically wasted.
And yes, I also know people who would like to play certain games, but no longer can from within Windows itself. Wine bypasses that problem (and actually I've had to use it even for supported GNU/Linux native games too, which otherwise no longer run on my system).

So Wine, and anything based on it, has its place.

You know what would grow demand? Seeing money coming in from day one releases. Vote with your wallet, buy a supported game (it'll be proprietary blobs, so who cares how it runs, so long as it's GNU/Linux supported), and the rest will tend to itself.

Maybe you missed it, but the entire problem is that WINE/Proton encourages Linux gamers to buy and support Windows games that come with zero Linux support and from devs who don't care about supporting Linux.

Some Linux users, Microsoft fanboys, and shills keep trumpeting this same propaganda, "Just buy Windows games without support for Linux, that'll be awesome! Who cares if you're contributing to killing Linux gaming? Just Do It!"

Everyone needs to stop encouraging Windows gaming on Linux and only encourage Linux gaming on Linux.

Playing your old Windows games on Linux is fine, but buying new Windows games isn't.
mirv 10 December 2019 at 7:32 pm UTC
View PC info
  • Supporter
  • Top Supporter
Swiftpaw
mirvWine has its place. Mostly for older games in my opinion, but it has its place. Trying to tell people that it's bad because it runs Windows software is....a little odd. It's encouraged people I know to actually move away from Windows, because that one application that they needed can now be run from within GNU/Linux.

I recall a bit of concern (my own included) when VP first released their titles. That concern turned out to be entirely unfounded. There have also been multiple games released via GOG that bundle Wine to get the game running. What matters is that the game is _supported_. The ability to run an unsupported game is just a benefit, so long as people know that if it doesn't work, then their money is basically wasted.
And yes, I also know people who would like to play certain games, but no longer can from within Windows itself. Wine bypasses that problem (and actually I've had to use it even for supported GNU/Linux native games too, which otherwise no longer run on my system).

So Wine, and anything based on it, has its place.

You know what would grow demand? Seeing money coming in from day one releases. Vote with your wallet, buy a supported game (it'll be proprietary blobs, so who cares how it runs, so long as it's GNU/Linux supported), and the rest will tend to itself.

Maybe you missed it, but the entire problem is that WINE/Proton encourages Linux gamers to buy and support Windows games that come with zero Linux support and from devs who don't care about supporting Linux.

Some Linux users, Microsoft fanboys, and shills keep trumpeting this same propaganda, "Just buy Windows games without support for Linux, that'll be awesome! Who cares if you're contributing to killing Linux gaming? Just Do It!"

Everyone needs to stop encouraging Windows gaming on Linux and only encourage Linux gaming on Linux.

Playing your old Windows games on Linux is fine, but buying new Windows games isn't.

I didn't miss your point, but you clearly didn't properly read what I had written.
You're comments are...snarky, for lack of a better word. I've tried to make the conversation more reasonable, but unless you calm down and discuss a matter, any points you attempt to make are lost. You've already derailed this entire topic away from what the article is about.

How about properly discussing the matter you've derailed it to, at least? If you're having a bad day, that's fine, but enough comments have gone by that I think we can move past it.
razing32 10 December 2019 at 8:15 pm UTC
gojulI have some another example like this : Eugen Systems (which have turned evil towards their own employees), made the Wargame series.

What happened there ?
Kimyrielle 10 December 2019 at 9:40 pm UTC
SwiftpawMaybe you missed it, but the entire problem is that WINE/Proton encourages Linux gamers to buy and support Windows games that come with zero Linux support and from devs who don't care about supporting Linux.

This isn't entirely wrong, but you have to understand that people who aren't complete zealots will never give up Windows unless their favorite games run on Linux. You bash Proton as if the devil itself had coded it, but from my perspective, Proton/DXVK is what allowed me to abandon Windows for good. Feral and the handful of publishers that release native games couldn't do it. Valve did.

I am an MMO fan. If you think I'd no longer play MMOs just to make a meaningless political statement, you're mistaken. And the number of MMORPGs available for Linux that don't suck is exactly zero. I am happy to have Proton/WINE, because it allows me to play these games in Linux. I honestly don't gave a damn what runs them, as long as they run. I am not saying you don't have a point, as running Windows games in Linux will always be considered unofficial and unsupported by devs, and there is no guarantee that a game that runs in Proton today will still run after the next patch.

But I prefer that over having to dual-boot into Windows every single time I want to play the 95% of AAA games that aren't available for Linux natively. Proton might not allow me to get rid of Windows games. But it allowed me to get rid of Windows. And that's a good thing.


Last edited by Kimyrielle on 10 December 2019 at 9:50 pm UTC
Linuxwarper 10 December 2019 at 9:54 pm UTC
SwiftpawYou're a fan of us not being given support for running a game on our OS like everyone else gets? Great, thanks for that, and for encouraging Windows gaming. Now those of us who support native releases with real Linux support, and those like you paying for Windows games with no Linux support, can all be 2nd class gamers together!
Show some respect? He never stated what you claim he has. We all want a game to be properly developed for Linux. If we didn't why would we be using Linux? There are so many games that I've not been able to play because developers never support the platform. And it has been said a million times, we don't have the userbase to justify major games (Call of Duty, Horizon Zero Dawn, Resident Evil to name a few) be developed for us as well.
Even if numbers were enough to turn a small profit...developing new content for Windows most likely gives more.

So if you think it is right for you to demand Focus Home Interactive to provide a Linux support (and continue doing so) I think you come off as entitled. I believe you are a passionate about Linux, but right now is not a point in time that we can demand things. Unless of course Focus Home Interactive has given a iron clad promise to provide Linux port. Assuming they have not done such thing, at most we should hope for the developers to get involved with Proton. If Proton stays consistent and makes more games available to us, hopefully anti cheat issue will be resolved, then most likely a glorious day will come where we will have adequate enough users to demand. But that day is not today.
subI have technically the highest respect for Proton and the like.
Yet, I see it as big problem for native Linux gaming and danger for AAA Linux gaming as a whole.
What if we will see a new Direct3D or similar API which will be widely adopted
and no old renderer is supported by most devs?
Now imagine this new API is - for whatever reason (maybe by intention) - extremely hard to reverse engineer and map to Vulkan/OpenGL? Hence, a well supported Proton/WINE layer is not available or will take years until it barely runs.
Proton not only helps games work on Linux but also improves upon Linux ecosystem in small ways AND promotes Vulkan. From Proton post (FAQ):

QuoteQ: I'm a developer; I wasn't planning on targeting Linux, how can I best leverage the new Steam Play?

We recommend you target Vulkan natively in order to offer the best possible performance on all platforms, or at least offer it as an option if possible. It's also a good idea to avoid any invasive third-party DRM middleware, as they sometimes prevent compatibility features from working as intended.


Last edited by Linuxwarper on 10 December 2019 at 10:09 pm UTC
wintermute 10 December 2019 at 10:13 pm UTC
LibertyPaulMSo the potential developer looks at the situation and says "Why develop specifically for OS/2, when we can just develop for Windows and 'kill two birds with one stone?'".

If IBM had done a better job of selling OS/2 then developers would have had a different answer to the question. Users were asking the question "Why would I spend more money on OS/2 when I just want to run Windows programs anyway.

SwiftpawWow, I didn't know that about OS/2. Always fun to find historical examples proving your point.

It would be nice but it's not true, OS/2 failed due to a number of bad decisions made by IBM, the Windows app support was a last ditch attempt to save it. It's a popular myth among Linux users.
While you're here, please consider supporting GamingOnLinux on Patreon, Liberapay or Paypal. We have no adverts, no paywalls, no timed exclusive articles. Just good, fresh content. Without your continued support, we simply could not continue!

You can find even more ways to support us on this dedicated page any time. If you already are, thank you!

You need to Register and Login to comment, submit articles and more.


Or login with...

Livestreams & Videos
Community Livestreams
  • GTFO - R2C1 - Work Together Or Die Together [GER/ENG]
Popular this week
View by Category
Contact
Latest Comments
Latest Forum Posts