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inXile Entertainment announce Wasteland 3 is delayed until August 28

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Wasteland 3 was originally set for May 19 and now that some platforms have access to a Beta, inXile Entertainment have said they're now going for an August 28 launch.

The main reason being of course the current Coronavirus situation, they said in an announcement on their official site that they're working from home like a lot of other companies which has impacted their work. However, they make it clear they're in a good position with Microsoft and Deep Silver supporting them well and they wish to ensure "a stellar product on day one".

A few platforms have access to the Beta and inXile say it has so far been "well received", so during this extra time they will go over all the feedback and continue "optimization, polishing and refinements, and making sure we have an awesome co-op experience".

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Features expected at release:

  • A party-based roleplaying game, with a renewed focus on our trademark complex story reactivity and strategic combat.
  • Adding a player vehicle, environmental dangers, and a revamped, more fluid action system, we are evolving on Wasteland 2's tactical turn-based combat and unique encounter design.
  • Play solo or co-op with a friend in a story-driven experience where your choices will open up (or close off) mission opportunities, areas to explore, story arcs, and more.
  • Your Ranger Base is a core part of the experience. As you help the local people and establish a reputation in Colorado, quests and narrative will force you to make decisions on how to lead.
  • Set in the savage lands of frozen Colorado, where survival is difficult and a happy outcome is never guaranteed. Players will face difficult moral choices and make sacrifices that will change the game world.
  • Wasteland 3 will feature a deep and engaging story utilizing a new dialog system, with all of it fully voiced.

Linux support is of course still confirmed for it as it was a platform advertised during the original Fig campaign. They re-confirmed this again later, and most recently to us on Twitter when querying the Wasteland Remaster which sadly is not on Linux but at least Wasteland 3 will be at release.

You can pre-order for £54.99/$59.99/€59.99, wishlist/follow or whatever else on GOG and Steam.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
Tags: Delayed, GOG, RPG, Steam, Upcoming | Apps: Wasteland 3
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24 comments
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Eike 3 April 2020 at 6:55 pm UTC
KimyrielleThat's the stuff you usually hear from dinosaur managers who are mentally unable...

Sorry, but honestly: If that's your custom way of communicating I understand if you tend to avoid to.
Eike 3 April 2020 at 7:09 pm UTC
TheSHEEEP
EikeYou must be joking. I'm working in a big software development department and it is just... hard. The infrastructure is fine for 5% working from home. It is overwhelmed with 90% working from home.
Not too surprised by that. If I remember that right, you are in Germany?
Came from there.

Digital stone age, decades behind the modern world. Especially in work culture, home office is practically an offensive word. Not surprised in the slightest switching to home office has overwhelmed a software company there for more than a week or two.

I don't know how many people are connected to the intranet I'm using, but it might easyily be tens of thousands. If you're able to bring up a net to cope with this in one or two weeks in a time where all those other companies are doing the same, drop us a note. I guess it's like buying lung supporting machines at the moment...

As said, home office is a custom practice in my company, but not as often. There's lots of reasons to it, one of which might be work culture, but others... We're also producing hardware in a multi 100 million Euros project secret for years, so you couldn't just take the software home, let alone the hardware. Many colleagues are using test hardware (not produced by us) costing tens of thousands of bucks you couldn't just take away either.

And there's reasons that are obvious to me, but doesn't seem obvious to others. You can tell things by looking at people, if they're moving their legs, where they are looking at, etc. pp. This gets lost at least with audio only conferences, some also in video. Every online communication has lag to it, which makes it the more uncomfortable to talk the more people attend. People unwillingly intercept each other due to that. And there's this "social" thing every social creature needs, not only after work.
TheSHEEEP 3 April 2020 at 9:41 pm UTC
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Eike
KimyrielleThat's the stuff you usually hear from dinosaur managers who are mentally unable...

Sorry, but honestly: If that's your custom way of communicating I understand if you tend to avoid to.
Some straight truths are very hard to deal with, aren't they?
Not everyone likes to communicate in sugarcoated words - some people prefer unfiltered directness and honesty.

Eikee're also producing hardware in a multi 100 million Euros project secret for years, so you couldn't just take the software home, let alone the hardware. Many colleagues are using test hardware (not produced by us) costing tens of thousands of bucks you couldn't just take away either.
Fair enough, but that just means to me that the company has to either sit it out or go into "slow motion" mode with only few people able to enter the offices at the same time, etc.
In such a scenario, mass home office is just not an option - doesn't sound to me like a case of "everyone doing home office overwhelming the company". More like "stay at home. Can't work right now at all".

EikeAnd there's reasons that are obvious to me, but doesn't seem obvious to others. You can tell things by looking at people, if they're moving their legs, where they are looking at, etc. pp. This gets lost at least with audio only conferences, some also in video.
None of which is even remotely relevant in software development.
What do I care what my colleage does with their legs or what they look at?
As long as they do their job and I can work with them, they could be watching "adult movies" all day long for all I care.


Last edited by TheSHEEEP on 3 April 2020 at 9:42 pm UTC
DrMcCoy 3 April 2020 at 10:26 pm UTC
TheSHEEEPNot everyone likes to communicate in sugarcoated words - some people prefer unfiltered directness and honesty.

Mind, there's a difference between "unfiltered directness and honesty" and speaking ignorance without thinking. A lot of people seem to confuse the latter for the former...

TheSHEEEPNone of which is even remotely relevant in software development.
What do I care what my colleage does with their legs or what they look at?

As a software engineer I have to empathically disagree. You forget that software development is done by humans, with humans, for humans.

There's unfortunately a lot of toxic "code ninja" and "10x coder" mentality floating around, but no, programming is, like most things, a communal activity. And the less barriers there are between people working together, the easier and quicker it is.

If you're pair programming, it is pretty vital to see where people look at. If you're defining a shared interface between different groups of people, it's best to do it in person, together, in the same room around a whiteboard. If you're debugging a weirdly behaving data bus, you want a second pair of eyes on this or a second pair of hands to prod a wire for you, this is not something you can do easily over voice chat.

There's a lot of nuances that get lost the more indirect communication is. Heck, I'm as introverted as they come, I'm not the best with communication or "people-stuff", I have to constantly push myself deal with weird human behaviour, but even I see that.
Kimyrielle 4 April 2020 at 4:02 am UTC
Eike
KimyrielleThat's the stuff you usually hear from dinosaur managers who are mentally unable...

Sorry, but honestly: If that's your custom way of communicating I understand if you tend to avoid to.

I am sorry if what I said offended you. Particularly since I nowhere implied that you're a dinosaur manager. Just that these words are what I am used to hear from dinosaur managers. I kinda have experience with that. When I was still employed, my line of work included migrating analog processes to digital ones. Go figure! As another poster said, it's just being honest and blunt.

It doesn't change my opinion, or the rest of my posting you chose not to react to. If your company would NOT be dinosaurs, "tens of thousands" of intranet users would mean exactly nothing. It's just a matter of putting up the needed infrastructure. Tens of thousands of concurrent users are actually laughable in 2020. If your company (big German tech company with tens of thousands of employees - let me take a wild guess? SAP?) isn't a collection of dinosaurs, you have to admit you were at least woefully unprepared to work in a modern fashion. You know, without wasting everybody's valuable lifetime and needlessly poisoning the environment by making everyone commute for two hours each way to an office to do the exact same things they can do at home.

Humans hate change. Right now it's being forced on them. If there is ANYTHING I find amusing about all of this, it's this.

Welcome to the 21st century!

PS: I am not sure if I like being associated with people who generally don't like to communicate. If I would be anti-social, why oh why would I even post here?
TheSHEEEP 4 April 2020 at 7:35 am UTC
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DrMcCoy
TheSHEEEPNot everyone likes to communicate in sugarcoated words - some people prefer unfiltered directness and honesty.

Mind, there's a difference between "unfiltered directness and honesty" and speaking ignorance without thinking. A lot of people seem to confuse the latter for the former...
Usually, it is the people calling someone ignorant that understand the least about anything and just try to put up some smokescreens to save appearances.
Better to not care about appearances to begin with, to not even fall into the trap.

DrMcCoy
TheSHEEEPNone of which is even remotely relevant in software development.
What do I care what my colleage does with their legs or what they look at?

As a software engineer I have to empathically disagree. You forget that software development is done by humans, with humans, for humans.
Oh, please. What you wanna do next, hold hands?
Maybe not the best idea at the moment.

DrMcCoyThere's unfortunately a lot of toxic "code ninja" and "10x coder" mentality floating around, but no, programming is, like most things, a communal activity. And the less barriers there are between people working together, the easier and quicker it is.
And yet, most software development companies I heard of have switched to "home office for the most part" just fine, without any loss of productivity after the initial period of change.
Plus, mark my words, this change will have a lasting effect even once all the disease business is over.

At the same time, there are many people like me who haven't set foot in an office for ages (at least not on a regular basis) and have never been more productive - unshackled from all the efficiency-reducing "socialising" that comes with an office scenario.

DrMcCoyIf you're pair programming, it is pretty vital to see where people look at. If you're defining a shared interface between different groups of people, it's best to do it in person, together, in the same room around a whiteboard. If you're debugging a weirdly behaving data bus, you want a second pair of eyes on this or a second pair of hands to prod a wire for you, this is not something you can do easily over voice chat.
Not that any of these are wrong, but they are all very special scenarios applied under very special circumstances that do not happen all too often for most people working in that sector.

And if you really believe there is no online replacement for "being around a whiteboard" or "pair programming" with other people, then I'd ask you if you are from Germany if I didn't already know the answer...
Digital isn't just voice or video chat.
Don't get me wrong. I am not blaming you, I escaped Germany - or rather its work and digital culture, the rest of Germany is pretty cool - and know that many people there, clever people, have really never heard of better alternatives. Not your fault is what I'm saying.

The vast majority of software development is done alone, hacking away at whatever software you are using, by anyone from designers to programmers. Well, if you want to get anything done, that is.
Obviously, losing some advantage for activities that you do rarely is worth gaining advantage for activities you do more often.

And, as it turns out, it is also way more healthy to not be on top of each other all the time.


Last edited by TheSHEEEP on 4 April 2020 at 7:41 am UTC
Eike 4 April 2020 at 2:05 pm UTC
KimyrielleIt doesn't change my opinion, or the rest of my posting you chose not to react to. If your company would NOT be dinosaurs, "tens of thousands" of intranet users would mean exactly nothing. It's just a matter of putting up the needed infrastructure.

I'm not a network guy, and I cannot judge how hard it actually is. My wild guess is you can't, either. But what I know for sure that things change with size. A matter of quantity does become a matter of quality sooner or later. And I know that there's a lack of supplies at the moment, not only in life support but also in computing and network power. Azure is scaling down non-vital businesses, YouTube, Netflix, you name it. So even if it would be easy under normal circumstances - we don't have those.

KimyrielleTens of thousands of concurrent users are actually laughable in 2020. If your company (big German tech company with tens of thousands of employees - let me take a wild guess? SAP?) isn't a collection of dinosaurs, you have to admit you were at least woefully unprepared to work in a modern fashion. You know, without wasting everybody's valuable lifetime and needlessly poisoning the environment by making everyone commute for two hours each way to an office to do the exact same things they can do at home.

If I don't remember completely wrong on your politcal posts here, one thing you should easily agree with is that modern isn't always better or even good. Being in an office has it's pros and cons, I'm usually meeting both on a daily basis. Calling home office "modern" sure isn't an argument. I gave some pro office in an other post. I absolutely agree an your valuable lifetime (*sigh *) and environemnt arguments, though.

KimyriellePS: I am not sure if I like being associated with people who generally don't like to communicate. If I would be anti-social, why oh why would I even post here?

Well, there's communication and communication. I'm introvert myself and online communication is easier for me.
Kimyrielle 4 April 2020 at 8:33 pm UTC
Eike
KimyrielleIt doesn't change my opinion, or the rest of my posting you chose not to react to. If your company would NOT be dinosaurs, "tens of thousands" of intranet users would mean exactly nothing. It's just a matter of putting up the needed infrastructure.

I'm not a network guy, and I cannot judge how hard it actually is. My wild guess is you can't, either. But what I know for sure that things change with size. A matter of quantity does become a matter of quality sooner or later. And I know that there's a lack of supplies at the moment, not only in life support but also in computing and network power. Azure is scaling down non-vital businesses, YouTube, Netflix, you name it. So even if it would be easy under normal circumstances - we don't have those.

Your guess is correct. Like you, I am a software person. I don't set up networks. Yet, I still comfortably stand by my statement that this load should not be an issue. Because there are networks around that handle loads like that and MUCH larger ones quite easily, so yours should be able too. Logically, your intranet has to handle the load no matter from where it originates, so it's really a function of being able to handle the bandwidth.

Eike
KimyrielleTens of thousands of concurrent users are actually laughable in 2020. If your company (big German tech company with tens of thousands of employees - let me take a wild guess? SAP?) isn't a collection of dinosaurs, you have to admit you were at least woefully unprepared to work in a modern fashion. You know, without wasting everybody's valuable lifetime and needlessly poisoning the environment by making everyone commute for two hours each way to an office to do the exact same things they can do at home.

If I don't remember completely wrong on your politcal posts here, one thing you should easily agree with is that modern isn't always better or even good. Being in an office has it's pros and cons, I'm usually meeting both on a daily basis. Calling home office "modern" sure isn't an argument. I gave some pro office in an other post. I absolutely agree an your valuable lifetime (*sigh *) and environemnt arguments, though.

I nowhere claimed that remote work is a flat improvement over office work. I know that office work has its upsides and that easier communication is one of them. I also understand that people in Europe tend to have super-tiny homes that aren't really designed for setting up work spaces for several family members. I get that.
But the bottom line is that after weighing pros and cons, remote work is STILL laughably superior. It saves both the employer and the employee -massive- costs. For most people, remote work has shown to be overall more productive than working in an office, because it eliminates many of these unproductive meetings that are good for nothing but drinking coffee, and because people generally can concentrate better on their work at home than in a noisy cubicle farm and are happier for being in a familiar environment. The ONE thing that takes a bit more thought is communication. But it's 2020, and we have the tools for that. It's no biggie.
You correctly pointed out that not every change is progress. Our so-called modern work culture is built around people founding a family, then making dad commute two hours in one direction, mom commute two hours in the other direction, and the kids get raised by total strangers doing it for money and not because they love them. The total amount of work including the silly commute takes so much of our available time that all we then tend to do as family is eating mass-produced frozen food for dinner and watch TV, because we lack the energy to do anything else. If that's modern society, then I really want to have no part of it.

My daughter is about to grow out of the age I have to taxi her to school every day or check that she's doing her homework. I could go back to work. Given that everybody seems to look for software engineers, I suppose there is even demand for me. But honestly, if somebody would tell me that I have to commute to an office five days a week to do the same work I can do at home, I'd just laugh at them and walk away. I don't want to work for dinosaurs.

Eike
KimyriellePS: I am not sure if I like being associated with people who generally don't like to communicate. If I would be anti-social, why oh why would I even post here?

Well, there's communication and communication. I'm introvert myself and online communication is easier for me.

I like both parts of communication. The personal and online sort of. I just don't want to drive for a total of three to four hours a day just to talk to 2 or 3 people in person for 20 minutes each, when I could do this ALMOST as effectively from home, save $100 a week in gas in the process, and spend said 3-4 hours a day with my family instead.

Honestly, office work-culture cannot die fast enough for me.


Last edited by Kimyrielle on 4 April 2020 at 8:38 pm UTC
DrMcCoy 4 April 2020 at 8:43 pm UTC
KimyrielleOur so-called modern work culture is built around people founding a family, then making dad commute two hours in one direction, mom commute two hours in the other direction

No, that's just the broken US.

My commute is 20 minutes by bicycle or public transportation. We have 2- or 3- people offices, with doors and all.
Children also don't need to be taxied to school, they walk, bike or take public transportation.


Last edited by DrMcCoy on 4 April 2020 at 8:44 pm UTC
Kimyrielle 4 April 2020 at 9:15 pm UTC
DrMcCoy
KimyrielleOur so-called modern work culture is built around people founding a family, then making dad commute two hours in one direction, mom commute two hours in the other direction

No, that's just the broken US.

My commute is 20 minutes by bicycle or public transportation. We have 2- or 3- people offices, with doors and all.
Children also don't need to be taxied to school, they walk, bike or take public transportation.

I guess that's the upside of living in a society building tiny homes where you can't move around without bumping into some wall after a step or two. Density like that makes commuting shorter, I guess?

Yeah, our cities are nothing like that.

I'd still rather work from my decently large home and not commute at all. It's preferable over living in a tiny house AND have to commute.

Sometimes you can have the cake and eat it, I guess?
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