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Supraland stops supporting Linux shortly after leaving GOG entirely

By - | Views: 22,337

Supraland, a highly rated open-world puzzle adventure, has now removed mentions of Linux on Steam as the developer is unable to actually support it.

This comes shortly after the developer asked for Supraland to be completely removed from GOG, after being there less than a year citing lower sales. If you read that previous linked article, this news likely won't come as much of a surprise. Checking on SteamDB, it seems they removed the note of Linux support earlier in June. Looking around, the developer mentioned this in the official Discord, "I stopped direct linux support. Using the windows version with proton gives much better results like a much higher framerate.".

This quite likely means Supraland 2 that was funded on Kickstarter, which mentioned Linux as a planned supported platform, won't support Linux either if this is how the developer plans to go forwards.

We've seen how the developer has repeatedly mentioned before that they actually "know nothing about linux". A shame but if you're going to sell your game on a platform, that you don't test it on and don't support in any way, what's the point? It's not good for anyone.


A repeating problem too, the weird expectation that clicking to export in a game engine is enough to sell the game without testing or supporting it, which needs to stop. No one would do the same for Windows or Consoles but as usual, it comes down to the low market share cycle of doom. Developers don't support Linux directly with the lower market share, so less people use Linux and repeat. We're at least seeing a clear upwards trend right now, so perhaps one day we can see more direct support when the user share is big enough.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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60 comments
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dibz 27 Jun
I prefer to look at it as Proton being a slower approach to taking down walls, and as soft encouragement to developers and publishers -- they may not have proper linux builds, but they may also actively choose supporting libraries and technologies that "don't not" support Proton/Linux. It honestly seems to me most compatibility problems tend to fall under those 3rd party gotchas, some 3rd party library or anti-cheat technology not part of the base game engine that ultimately breaks their Linux compatibility. First baby steps that imply consideration for Linux, it'll help developer opinions of Linux if they can "support" it with simple early consideration like that; and it'll help adoption if the games "play" while on Linux without any googling or fixes first. As that userbase grows, well, so does people that would want a Linux build!

And lets be honest, half the problem with linux adoption is "Windows people who tried it 10 years ago w/ their energy-drink inspired keyboard and unsupported wireless drivers who googled an incorrect blog entry before writing their own incorrect blog entry about how to support something and now take every chance they get to rag on Linux in some unrelated social media post comment thread" mindset.

The good news is every time Microsoft or Apple force an unpleasant change people tend to re-evaluate their options, which I can imagine only helps. Even my wife, who absolutely loathes change in her technology, asked me about putting Linux on her laptop after she was first introduced to Windows 10.

Will that idea work out in the end? Maybe, maybe not. I certainly know some of my friends/peers have had renewed or initial interest in Linux lately.
Liam Dawe 27 Jun
Quoting: LibertyPaulMDeveloping a game for linux is NOT easy and we all have been guilty of spreading the myth that it is.
With respect, I disagree. We all have? Speak for yourself perhaps. No platform is easy. The difference is with Windows, it's considered the norm and so it's where developers usually start off so it naturally is for them the easier option. It doesn't make Linux itself suddenly hard to develop for, that in itself is spreading a myth.

Quoting: LibertyPaulMFrankly my dream is that ultimately one day the OS you run will become irrelevant and then the "native gaming" nonsense goes away for good.
That's realistically not something we're going to see in any of our lifetimes.
mylka 27 Jun
can we talk about "support" here? he just press the "compile for linux" button and hopes for the best!
i wouldnt call that "support", so he cant stop supporting it, if he never supported it
Ehvis 27 Jun
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Quoting: x_wingThe game works. The only problem is an erroneous deploy on Steam + a bug on the content selection. The attitude makes me remember by a lot to Garry Newman.

I tried it a week or two ago and it crashed on startup with no immediately clear indication of what the problem was.
Shaolu 27 Jun
Quoting: LibertyPaulMAnother case of "if you are not familiar with linux don't port your game to linux", that will just lead to having a bad time. Developing a game for linux is NOT easy and we all have been guilty of spreading the myth that it is.

Frankly my dream is that ultimately one day the OS you run will become irrelevant and then the "native gaming" nonsense goes away for good.

There's 3 ways an OS can be technically irrelevant to a developer:

1. You're writing an app to run on a cross-platform environment like a browser or VM.
2. Every major OS adheres to some kind of set of open standards with any differences being trivial enough to ignore (effectively like how you can make a website that renders mostly the same on either Chrome or Firefox).
3. You're software interfaces directly with hardware and is effectively its own OS.

#3 is okay if your "game" is a 1980's style old school LED game on a custom piece of hardware, but otherwise completely non-feasible. It would be simpler to at least bundle your game with an OS like how routers build their firmware with a custom slimmed down GNU/Linux distro embedded that the software runs atop.

#1 just kicks the problem up another level of abstraction. Your browser/VM effectively becomes the "platform" that everyone has to use anyhow. Back in the day when Internet Explorer dominated the web and Microsoft first ported it to Mac OS you could technically make a site that targeted just one platform and have it run on multiple OSes by targeting IE... but how wonderful of a solution was that really?

#2 Gets to the real root of the issue. If every game dev used Vulkan/OpenGL, OpenAL, and other cross-platform FOSS technologies in tandem with and part of a cross-platform game engine, then it would be incredibly trivial to make your game available on another OS. Hypothetically it could get to the point where clicking "Export" in Unity or what have you would truly work without issue. And we are closer than ever to getting there.

This is the same reason why it's more important to advocate for people in general to use more FOSS technology in general. The average EU is more concerned about what apps and games they can run on a given platform than anything else. So if you recommend to your friends and family software that run cross-platform then it becomes a lot easier to persuade them to switch their OS and boost market share for GNU/Linux.
Alm888 27 Jun
I'll just add this to my "Just Use Proton™" collection to remind people later.
Quoting: Whitewolfe80That problem is of course proton has become the clutch we all rely on for games on linux. We have collectively given up on native gaming…
Well, I certainly haven't. "No Tux No Bucks" all the way for me!

P.S. Next on the news: "A developer reveals it is totally not worth it to support Linux on a gamedev confereince".
This fellow will probably feel itself comfortable in the company of Tommy "Linux can f*ck off for all I care" Refenes and Ben "<0.1% of sales but >20% of auto reported crashes and support tickets" Golus.


Last edited by Alm888 on 27 June 2020 at 5:05 pm UTC
Good riddance. I think it is a good thing if less developers are on the Linux platform that don't want to put any work in to make a quality Linux game.

Quoting: LibertyPaulMAnother case of "if you are not familiar with linux don't port your game to linux", that will just lead to having a bad time. Developing a game for linux is NOT easy and we all have been guilty of spreading the myth that it is.

Frankly my dream is that ultimately one day the OS you run will become irrelevant and then the "native gaming" nonsense goes away for good.

Speak for yourself not others. I don't spout garbage like making a Linux version is easy.
x_wing 27 Jun
Quoting: Ehvis
Quoting: x_wingThe game works. The only problem is an erroneous deploy on Steam + a bug on the content selection. The attitude makes me remember by a lot to Garry Newman.

I tried it a week or two ago and it crashed on startup with no immediately clear indication of what the problem was.

Open your game directory, rename/remove "Supraland/Content/Paks/Supraland-WindowsNoEditor.pak" and the game will run flawlessly.


Last edited by x_wing on 27 June 2020 at 5:55 pm UTC
CatKiller 27 Jun
Quoting: constWe even celebrate those that ignore us but implement a Vulkan renderer.

Would you prefer that individual game devs became more tightly dependent on DirectX rather than developing their cross-platform skillset?
Patola 27 Jun
Quoting: x_wing
Quoting: Ehvis
Quoting: x_wingThe game works. The only problem is an erroneous deploy on Steam + a bug on the content selection. The attitude makes me remember by a lot to Garry Newman.

I tried it a week or two ago and it crashed on startup with no immediately clear indication of what the problem was.

Open your game directory, rename/remove "Supraland/Content/Paks/Supraland-WindowsNoEditor.pak" and the game will run flawlessly.

Thank you, the game suffered a 1.4 GB update today and as there was a long time I have not played it, I just tried it today and it did crash. I did what you recommended and now it's running perfectly.
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