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Cyberpunk 2077 confirmed for Stadia on November 19

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While the upcoming Cyberpunk 2077 will not support the Linux desktop, it is at least confirmed to be launching on Stadia same-day as other platforms on November 19.

This gives Linux gamers another way to play, with Stadia getting more huge upcoming games, as on Linux all you need is a Chromium browser and a mouse or gamepad hooked up. If your country is in the supported list for Stadia, that is. Google has still yet to announce wider support for the game streaming service.

Stadia getting probably one of, if not the biggest release this year day and date with other platforms with Cyberpunk 2077 is pretty huge news and perhaps a show of how serious Google are about bringing more people and more games over to it.

From the press release:

“Huge in scale and scope, Cyberpunk 2077 is our most ambitious game to date. It’s humbling to see just how many people are looking forward to playing it, and we want to make it possible for as many gamers as possible come November 19th, when the game launches. The Stadia version will allow players to jump into Night City just seconds after the game unlocks for play worldwide without any downloads needed,” said Michał Nowakowski, SVP of Business Development, CD PROJEKT.

"CD PROJEKT RED are known for developing some of the biggest and best games ever created, and Cyberpunk 2077 is sure to deliver as the most anticipated game of the last few years. We're thrilled to announce that Cyberpunk 2077 will be available on Stadia November 19th. Cyberpunk 2077 on Stadia will allow gamers to play on their favorite screens and never have to wait for a download or install to get into, and explore, the depths of Night City," said Shanna Preve, Managing Director, Stadia Partnerships.

Plenty more footage was shown off recently too on the official YouTube, like this one showing off plenty of the vehicles you will be able to get your hands on:

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They also confirmed that people who buy the game on Stadia will get a set of Cyberpunk 2077-themed digital goodies including: the game’s original score, art booklet, the original Cyberpunk 2020 sourcebook and Cyberpunk 2077: Your Voice comic book, as well as a set of wallpapers for desktop and mobile.

See Cyberpunk 2077 on Stadia.

It's worth noting also, that CD PROJEKT RED have been embroiled in plenty of controversy around Cyberpunk 2077. Video game journalist Jason Schreier has been covering it in detail, with a developer who was apparently confirmed to be working on it posting about the working conditions on Reddit too. Crunch is seriously terrible and it's such a massive shame these big games keep forcing such terrible conditions on developers. 


Don't miss that we're expecting more big Stadia news next week, which we will be following along.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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102 comments
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mirv 16 Oct
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Quoting: damarrinCDP only made the Stadia version because Google paid them to do that. It's my opinion ofc, but it's clear as day that's the case.

Begging anyone to release anything on Linux, especially a Linux-hostile company such as CDP, is completely counter productive. They (we?) now have Proton which will support Cyberpunk sooner or later and they'll gladly take our money. Most likely, they won't even notice that money swamped with all the actual Windows customers as they will be.

We need market share. That's the only thing that matters.

As you've just stated, many in the desktop Linux kernel using crowd are more than happy to pay for a Windows release of the game. Is then CDP really that hostile, or is it simply not worth it for them? They put in zero effort, need do no QA or support, and yet get sales. Pretty hard to argue against that.

However this game I may well end up going with Stadia. It will be an awfully large download otherwise, and my own rig probably couldn't play it regardless. I wouldn't be adding mods, and if the response times are ok...yeah, think I'd rather go the Stadia route than fork over for a Windows version. Assuming other bills aren't in the way and I'm ok with paying full price for the game.
TheRiddick 16 Oct
Imagine buying this on Stadia, and a year from now Google pulls the plug like so many other of their projects.

Everyone just looses all the games they paid for because you were just paying for a service after all.. Going to be interesting to see the reactions and backlash (if any) when that happens. (and it will)

Also CDPR isn't Linux hostile, they support it with their release packaging system and have released on Linux in the past. I would say that CDPR has lost faith in Linux support is more accurate then being hostile.

I'm not sure if this game is going to be DX12 or Vulkan yet, hopefully the later. (would make sense for non MS platform support)


Anyway I have a PC Steam copy of Cyberpunk (I think) which will be released next month sometime, but I won't be playing it until I upgrade my GPU for better 4k resolution support (1080TI struggles sadly).
Atm retailers are gouging the crap out of people with the 3080 cards so I might just hold off playing until mid 2021...


Last edited by TheRiddick on 16 October 2020 at 12:54 pm UTC
Linas 16 Oct
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Quoting: mirv...many in the desktop Linux kernel using crowd are more than happy to pay for a Windows release of the game.

If it works, yes. But you rare relying on community reports (ProtonDB) to know if it does. And the experience is often that it only mostly works. Some games don't work at all. Even titles whitelisted by Valve (like Doom) have no indication of that on their Steam pages.

There is no such thing as zero-effort support. Because if you support something, you have to make sure that it works, regardless of how you achieve it. Otherwise it's like people buying gym subscriptions and end up never using them. Sure, there's a few that do that, but you don't plan your budget based on that.

I love the "do it yourself" mentality of the Linux world, but that alone won't get us very far. We still need the devs (or rather their managers) onboard too.
mirv 16 Oct
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Quoting: Linas
Quoting: mirv...many in the desktop Linux kernel using crowd are more than happy to pay for a Windows release of the game.

If it works, yes. But you rare relying on community reports (ProtonDB) to know if it does. And the experience is often that it only mostly works. Some games don't work at all. Even titles whitelisted by Valve (like Doom) have no indication of that on their Steam pages.

There is no such thing as zero-effort support. Because if you support something, you have to make sure that it works, regardless of how you achieve it. Otherwise it's like people buying gym subscriptions and end up never using them. Sure, there's a few that do that, but you don't plan your budget based on that.

I love the "do it yourself" mentality of the Linux world, but that alone won't get us very far. We still need the devs (or rather their managers) onboard too.

Point I was trying to make is that I don't think many companies would bother with even minimal support for anything running on desktop GNU/Linux because they're essentially getting it for free from elsewhere. From a pure economics standpoint, it makes zero sense - which is why I'm a little dispirited when there are complaints about Stadia, followed immediately about how someone will just use "Proton" so it doesn't matter.
Just ironic how Stadia is a supported way to play under GNU/Linux (with caveats - yes the whole worry about Google pulling the plug on Stadia), but so many are far more interested in paying for a Windows version.
damarrin 16 Oct
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I think CDP may have been neutral towards Linux before the Witcher 2 fiasco, but I think they’re hostile now.
kellerkindt 16 Oct
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I don't understand that Valve isn't talking CDPR into a Linux release on steam. I mean, they see as we do, that there will be a native Linux port of the game, which is missing just a tiny* bit of extra effort for a Linux release on Steam.

Come on Valve. For Stadia games in general. The extra effort they need to be convinced to do is so small that Valve wouldn't need to get out their big guns/sponsorships/whatever. Offer them to take 1% less from their revenue for a year if they provide a proper and working Linux version or something trivial like that.

It just feels like Valve is missing the low hanging fruits here with not getting Stadia games on Linux for Steam. They are doing all the driver and kernel involvements but skip the final blow.

*comparing it to the whole port

As an afterthought: Feral could provide the Stadia-to-Linux-Steam effort and support


Last edited by kellerkindt on 16 October 2020 at 2:10 pm UTC
Quoting: mirvPoint I was trying to make is that I don't think many companies would bother with even minimal support for anything running on desktop GNU/Linux because they're essentially getting it for free from elsewhere. From a pure economics standpoint, it makes zero sense - which is why I'm a little dispirited when there are complaints about Stadia, followed immediately about how someone will just use "Proton" so it doesn't matter.
Just ironic how Stadia is a supported way to play under GNU/Linux (with caveats - yes the whole worry about Google pulling the plug on Stadia), but so many are far more interested in paying for a Windows version.
The problem here is that the "supported" stadia basically has the problems of unsupported Windows/Proton titles build into the system. Even worse: you are in danger of not only losing access to one title but to your complete library. Stadia is currently just not a comparable competitor to the more traditional vendors + a lot of people can not even use the service for technical or geographical reasons. It is simply a completely different beast than traditional gaming.
That aside the answer is simple: a not desktop native game never gets paid anything near the full price. Which also means, that the chances of getting paid for fully by the Windows users I game with regularly, sinks significantly.
A service like Stadia will only ever get money if they either provide Steam/GoG keys for the games they sell games in addition to the streaming service or they give access to the their whole library in exchange for a monthly fee.
"it is at least confirmed to be launching on Stadia" which means nothing to me since I can't play, even if I wanted to lol.
Liam Dawe 16 Oct
Quoting: TheSHEEEPIt should be such a small step from Stadia to generic Linux release, shouldn't it?
Well, no. Same as always: low Linux market share, that then requires direct support across different HW and SW.
x_wing 16 Oct
Quoting: gabberIt IS frustrating. We were hyped for stadia because it uses linux. Dreamed of getting more games working on linux...

Now it's just another streaming service with exclusives . It does not matter one bit that it uses linux.

In the end it proves that it's not a technical limitation but a publisher decision that we don't get a Linux version. Of course, I'm not saying that porting a game to Stadia is the same as creating a desktop Linux version but in this case is quite sad to see that the company that owns GoG and does support Linux doesn't want to do the extra mile.
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