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The Raspberry Pi sure is a versatile device and thanks to GameMaker Studio 2 from YoYo Games, it might even end up as more of a gaming unit with newly added support for exported games.

In the version 2.3.1.542 release of GameMaker Studio 2 that went live on December 16 (details), it mentioned in the release notes how it now supports "Ubuntu ARMv7" as an output type for their editor. We discovered this thanks to the developer of Shield Cat mentioning on their Patreon post how they've been updating their game to hit higher performance on the Raspberry Pi.

Curious about more details on this, we reached out to YoYo Games to clarify some details of this new feature. Their CTO, Russell Kay, mentioned this in reply to why they started supporting Linux ARM devices:

We are big fans of the Raspberry Pi and have been looking to support the device in a cost effective way with the release of the OpenGL driver and the higher power (CPU and GPU). It became viable for us to release and support the Raspberry Pi target, since it was generic we expanded it to include devices that support the armeabihf architecture, assuming the device has the correct libraries that we require, but our primary target is the Raspberry Pi running raspbian.

With that all now in place they said this in reply to future upgrades to their Linux support in GameMaker Studio 2:

We will improve our Linux offering over future versions, but we are not able to announce specific changes at this stage.

Game Maker Studio powers some really popular games, and it continues to be a very popular game engine for indie developers. Released titles like Hyper Light Drifter, Minit, The Eternal Castle [REMASTERED], The Swords of Ditto, Stoneshard, Nuclear Throne and a great many more were all built with it.

Will be fun to see if many developers decide to put out more Linux builds of their games when using GMS2, both on the desktop and for the fantastic Raspberry Pi device family.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
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8 comments

Mohandevir 21 Dec, 2020
And now... Gamescope on Raspbian.

Unfortunately, it would require an ARM Steam client, but it would be a fun thing to witness.


Last edited by Mohandevir on 21 December 2020 at 1:21 pm UTC
Spyker 21 Dec, 2020
I still wonder why there isn't a gaming market on Raspberry Pi yet, considering the million devices already sold.
Mohandevir 21 Dec, 2020
Quoting: SpykerI still wonder why there isn't a gaming market on Raspberry Pi yet, considering the million devices already sold.

It could make for a nice little gaming box... Much cheaper than the Atari VCS.
Wompo 21 Dec, 2020
I've had gamepad problems with GameMaker Studio 2 games. I actually had to refund Chronicon because for the life of me I couldn't get it to work. I hope things will get better now.
denyasis 21 Dec, 2020
Quoting: SpykerI still wonder why there isn't a gaming market on Raspberry Pi yet, considering the million devices already sold.

ARM. That's my guess anyway. Not even all the linux distros target or can when run on a PI without issues, mostly due to hardware limitations.

It is probably too much of a hurdle for commercial games at this stage.

Emulators, classic games and the like, on the other hand,bit seems perfect for
Spyker 21 Dec, 2020
Quoting: denyasis
Quoting: SpykerI still wonder why there isn't a gaming market on Raspberry Pi yet, considering the million devices already sold.

ARM. That's my guess anyway. Not even all the linux distros target or can when run on a PI without issues, mostly due to hardware limitations.

It is probably too much of a hurdle for commercial games at this stage.
I don't see that as an issue.
From my point of view the RPI is a platform of its own.
It has an official OS with capable OGLES 3.0 drivers (it even supports Vulkan now).
It could perfectly run a lots of indie games. It should be easier to target than a regular Linux PC because it has a fixed hardware and an official OS (you don't even have to target other distro).
mirv 21 Dec, 2020
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Quoting: Spyker
Quoting: denyasis
Quoting: SpykerI still wonder why there isn't a gaming market on Raspberry Pi yet, considering the million devices already sold.

ARM. That's my guess anyway. Not even all the linux distros target or can when run on a PI without issues, mostly due to hardware limitations.

It is probably too much of a hurdle for commercial games at this stage.
I don't see that as an issue.
From my point of view the RPI is a platform of its own.
It has an official OS with capable OGLES 3.0 drivers (it even supports Vulkan now).
It could perfectly run a lots of indie games. It should be easier to target than a regular Linux PC because it has a fixed hardware and an official OS (you don't even have to target other distro).

The RPi4 handles all that, but there are more constraints on the probably still more widespread RPi3. So the baseline is still the RPi3 for now (though that will one day change).

Also, while the RPi3/4 hardware is quite capable, optimising is another matter. There's really no brute forcing through performance on all but the most basic of games, limiting the choice to either very basic games, or probably more development time than it's worth for many.
kneekoo 24 Dec, 2020
YoYo Games
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