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Today AMD released FidelityFX Super Resolution, their attempt to answer NVIDIA's DLSS and the source code to it is coming soon for developers to look at. Update 24/06/21 - it does actually work on Linux both in native titles (like Dota 2) and Steam Play Proton - even for NVIDIA GPUs.

What exactly is it then? It's AMD's solution for producing high resolution frames from lower resolution inputs. From what AMD say: "it uses a collection of cutting-edge algorithms with a particular emphasis on creating high-quality edges, giving large performance improvements compared to rendering at native resolution directly. FSR enables “practical performance” for costly render operations, such as hardware ray tracing.".

It supports Vulkan and DirectX, although currently it seems it's actually limited to Windows as mentions of Linux have been absent from any press materials and official announcements from AMD. Once it's properly open source, which AMD say will happen "mid July" on GPUOpen, there should hopefully be nothing to stop Mesa developers hooking up support for it to then work for Linux native titles and Windows games run through Steam Play Proton. The latest "official" AMD driver (being the Radeon Software for Linux) had an update only yesterday, June 21, which simply bumped up the supported Linux distribution version.

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AMD's version will at least work across both NVIDIA and AMD GPUs, which may make it end up becoming more of a standard compared to DLSS but they face an uphill battle since NVIDIA has a firm foothold with DLSS already.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
Tags: AMD, Meta, Open Source
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19 comments
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KROM 22 Jun
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Now, if they finally would create a new control center for Linux to configure all that fancy stuff, that'd be awesome.
Zlopez 22 Jun
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Quoting: KROMNow, if they finally would create a new control center for Linux to configure all that fancy stuff, that'd be awesome.

And ideally make it open as well. :-)
rojimboo 22 Jun
QuoteAMD's version will at least work across both NVIDIA and AMD GPUs, which may make it end up becoming more of a standard compared to DLSS but they face an uphill battle since NVIDIA has a firm foothold with DLSS already.

I think for many of us Nvidia gamers, the big thing AMD brings to the table is the fact that it works on non-RTX 10xx cards too. Unlike DLSS.
scaine 22 Jun
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Quoting: KROMNow, if they finally would create a new control center for Linux to configure all that fancy stuff, that'd be awesome.

Why? What would be in such a control centre? One of the things I love about AMD's design on Linux is explicitly NOT having any configuration to do. I just tick, or untick vsync in each game and it works (whereas on Nvidia, it was a coin-toss if it did anything at all).
BielFPs 22 Jun
Quoting: KROMNow, if they finally would create a new control center for Linux to configure all that fancy stuff, that'd be awesome.
Personally I would prefer if they release the necessary config parameters of the said "control center" instead of launch one of their on, so different distros/DEs could easily integrate those configs in their specifics control panels and avoiding the risk of conflicts between both of them.

But yeah, it's bad if the only option is to manually change those through text commands.
kirgahn 22 Jun
I'd say that this is fantastic news. Going by the first reviews, FSR seems to be better than DLSS 1.0 and slightly inferior to DLSS 2.0. Now, given that it's built on open source tech, the source it's going to available soon, it'll be supported on current gen consoles and three-four generations of GPUs I would say that we have a winner. Hopefully developers will embrace it and we'll get it soon enough.
jarhead_h 22 Jun
"AMD's version will at least work across both NVIDIA and AMD GPUs, which may make it end up becoming more of a standard compared to DLSS but they face an uphill battle since NVIDIA has a firm foothold with DLSS already."

So they are gonna drop the source online and hope the community picks up the slack. Might work.
mirv 22 Jun
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As far as I know, FSR is basically a couple of shaders? So I wonder if it could be injected to any game via something like vkBasalt. Pretty sure it wouldn't be quite something so simple. Suppose I should read up on it more to know if that would be viable. It'd definitely be very cool if it was, just from a technical perspective, even if I wouldn't really benefit much personally from this kind of thing.
CatKiller 22 Jun
Quoting: mirvAs far as I know, FSR is basically a couple of shaders? So I wonder if it could be injected to any game via something like vkBasalt. Pretty sure it wouldn't be quite something so simple. Suppose I should read up on it more to know if that would be viable. It'd definitely be very cool if it was, just from a technical perspective, even if I wouldn't really benefit much personally from this kind of thing.
If it has some particularly tasty rescaling algorithms, a nicer place to pick it up would be gamescope if, say, there were some performance-constrained AMD hardware that was habitually upscaling.
mirv 22 Jun
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Quoting: CatKiller
Quoting: mirvAs far as I know, FSR is basically a couple of shaders? So I wonder if it could be injected to any game via something like vkBasalt. Pretty sure it wouldn't be quite something so simple. Suppose I should read up on it more to know if that would be viable. It'd definitely be very cool if it was, just from a technical perspective, even if I wouldn't really benefit much personally from this kind of thing.
If it has some particularly tasty rescaling algorithms, a nicer place to pick it up would be gamescope if, say, there were some performance-constrained AMD hardware that was habitually upscaling.

Also makes me wonder if this might be used on the new mobile phone partnership between amd and samsung. Raytracing is expensive, but add this kind of thing in there and it might suddenly be more mobile viable.

Probably going to be a lot more applications than in what the marketing people are showcasing, that's quite true.
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