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KDE Discover gets update to prevent you breaking your Linux system

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I must say, I appreciate the attention to make things not only simpler but less breakable lately. First we had APT being patched to stop users removing essential packages, now the KDE Discover software manager gets a similar upgrade.

Developer Nate Graham has written up another great "This week in KDE" blog post, going over changes and improvements coming to the next release of Plasma and the various applications. One small change really caught my eye though! Discover now has a new way to ensure you keep a working system, with an updated mechanism to detect important packages getting removed and give you a friendly warning on it free of too much technical jargon.

Picture Source - Nate Graham

Graham's comment underneath "Hopefully this is Linus-Sebastian-proof", heh. I hope many more application developers are looking at the way Discover and APT are evolving to ensure things are a bit more idiot-proof.

Another change to make things look a bit friendlier in Discover is that previously, if you had issues upgrading, it would instantly shove a load of technical details in your face. To normal consumers, that's clearly not going to do much to help and could probably scare them away. Now, instead, it will provide a very clear and friendly message, with the option to get more details to report the issue.

Picture Source - Nate Graham

Plenty more upgrades to Plasma are in the works too, like the newer KWin Overview effect gaining the ability to display search results from KRunner, which brings it another step closer to the GNOME Activities Overview feature, which I did always find thoroughly useful.

There's plenty more fixes in the full post.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
Tags: KDE, Meta, Open Source
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I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly.
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Beamboom 23 Nov, 2021
Quoting: Purple Library GuyI started somewhere around the turn of the millennium--not sure which side, might have been '99 or so. My first distro was Red Hat.

Hey thanks for that rundown! And I see nothing in this story that indicates that your kind is what I had in mind when I said "not for everyone". Quite the contrary. You've had issues and overcame them. Of course, it always sucks when something breaks - and especially when you have no idea why. It's like that for everyone.

But you've overcome the obstacles and I am pretty sure you also have learnt from it. And you kept going. That's what a Linux user IS, in my book.

The only point you might disagree with me on here, is that I think it's a GOOD thing to have a system as open as Linux. I will defend the right of this OS, of all the alternatives out there, to be a bit different. To demand - even expect - something of the user. Not in regards to the amount of knowledge - but the willingness to obtain that knowledge.
Like you have, by sticking to your gun.
Purple Library Guy 23 Nov, 2021
Quoting: Beamboom
Quoting: Purple Library GuyI started somewhere around the turn of the millennium--not sure which side, might have been '99 or so. My first distro was Red Hat.

Hey thanks for that rundown! And I see nothing in this story that indicates that your kind is what I had in mind when I said "not for everyone". Quite the contrary. You've had issues and overcame them. Of course, it always sucks when something breaks - and especially when you have no idea why. It's like that for everyone.

But you've overcome the obstacles and I am pretty sure you also have learnt from it. And you kept going. That's what a Linux user IS, in my book.

The only point you might disagree with me on here, is that I think it's a GOOD thing to have a system as open as Linux. I will defend the right of this OS, of all the alternatives out there, to be a bit different. To demand - even expect - something of the user. Not in regards to the amount of knowledge - but the willingness to obtain that knowledge.
Like you have, by sticking to your gun.
But it's not '99 any more. If I started today, I wouldn't have had to do any of that stuff. And I wouldn't have done it, because I only did it because I had to. I wasn't on a voyage of discovery, I was just trying to un-break stuff.

Not saying I gained zero knowledge. But on average, I'd rather have been gaining other knowledge instead. I'm an artsie--by preference, not because of aptitude. I was actually a seriously massive math whiz in my youth, without even trying; showed pretty good aptitude for programming too. But I went into English Lit and so forth because that's what I like.


Last edited by Purple Library Guy on 23 November 2021 at 8:50 pm UTC
Beamboom 23 Nov, 2021
Quoting: Purple Library GuyBut it's not '99 any more. If I started today, I wouldn't have had to do any of that stuff. And I wouldn't have done it, because I only did it because I had to. I wasn't on a voyage of discovery, I was just trying to un-break stuff.
But that's how you learn!!

And also, back in that era the Linux desktop were in a totally different and extremely premature state. Remember that we didn't even have a unison clipboard across applications? Some applications used this clipboard, others used another solution for it and some simply didn't have it implemented. Same with drag'n'drop. :D

So the problem back then were that shit didn't really work properly at all, especially on the graphical user interface side of things. They were downright horrible. The package management and the repositories too were a completely different story.

But today things work! And work really well. Just with not too many crutches or rescue parachutes. Lean and mean, and with all power to the user.

I like that. As you've probably figured out by now. :)


Last edited by Beamboom on 23 November 2021 at 9:53 pm UTC
Purple Library Guy 23 Nov, 2021
Quoting: Beamboom
Quoting: Purple Library GuyBut it's not '99 any more. If I started today, I wouldn't have had to do any of that stuff. And I wouldn't have done it, because I only did it because I had to. I wasn't on a voyage of discovery, I was just trying to un-break stuff.
But that's how you learn!!
I don't care!
You learn lots of ways. I learn many things by reading books.
slaapliedje 24 Nov, 2021
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Quoting: Purple Library Guy
Quoting: Beamboom
Quoting: Purple Library GuyBut it's not '99 any more. If I started today, I wouldn't have had to do any of that stuff. And I wouldn't have done it, because I only did it because I had to. I wasn't on a voyage of discovery, I was just trying to un-break stuff.
But that's how you learn!!
I don't care!
You learn lots of ways. I learn many things by reading books.
Wish I could make you read the Pathfinder 2e books for me so I wouldn't have to read them myself. 😜
Purple Library Guy 24 Nov, 2021
Quoting: slaapliedje
Quoting: Purple Library Guy
Quoting: Beamboom
Quoting: Purple Library GuyBut it's not '99 any more. If I started today, I wouldn't have had to do any of that stuff. And I wouldn't have done it, because I only did it because I had to. I wasn't on a voyage of discovery, I was just trying to un-break stuff.
But that's how you learn!!
I don't care!
You learn lots of ways. I learn many things by reading books.
Wish I could make you read the Pathfinder 2e books for me so I wouldn't have to read them myself. 😜
Sorry, filled up recently on D&D 5th edition. I was amazed . . . it's actually got less skills and day to day utility magic, you know, for doing non-kill kind of stuff, than later bits of old school AD&D 1st edition. In other ways I was surprised just how little has changed. Rules a bit more consistent, a couple of interesting new character classes and mechanics, fighters get a few tactical options, multi-classing is basically dead because it was OP as hell, some quirky flavour lost, but basically, it's still D&D.
slaapliedje 24 Nov, 2021
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Quoting: Purple Library Guy
Quoting: slaapliedje
Quoting: Purple Library Guy
Quoting: Beamboom
Quoting: Purple Library GuyBut it's not '99 any more. If I started today, I wouldn't have had to do any of that stuff. And I wouldn't have done it, because I only did it because I had to. I wasn't on a voyage of discovery, I was just trying to un-break stuff.
But that's how you learn!!
I don't care!
You learn lots of ways. I learn many things by reading books.
Wish I could make you read the Pathfinder 2e books for me so I wouldn't have to read them myself. 😜
Sorry, filled up recently on D&D 5th edition. I was amazed . . . it's actually got less skills and day to day utility magic, you know, for doing non-kill kind of stuff, than later bits of old school AD&D 1st edition. In other ways I was surprised just how little has changed. Rules a bit more consistent, a couple of interesting new character classes and mechanics, fighters get a few tactical options, multi-classing is basically dead because it was OP as hell, some quirky flavour lost, but basically, it's still D&D.
Ha, I only started buying PF2e books because Humble Bundle had a cheap physical copy of the Bestiary. Trying to convince someone else to GM Pathfinder, he asked if we could just do 'Homebrew' now to me that means either A) Programs for computers past their prime, or B) just make up your own rules, which then why use PF2e? But he meant for the Campaign setting.

Now in my mind, D&D and Pathfinder are both very much tied to their campaign setting(s). With their races or ancestries, whatever they want to call them. And their classes, etc. The entire way the games work seem very much built to exist within certain realms. Now could you use the systems to make up your own worlds and such? Sure... but GURPS in it's very nature is great at such things, as it's built more as a framework / tool kit for role-playing, vs something like D&D and Pathfinder, where their logic and consistency isn't exactly tied to any sort of realism, ans fit much better within their own realms. It's like trying to imagine doing something realistic and science-y with Spelljammer. :P

Sorry, I know this is WAY off topic!
Purple Library Guy 25 Nov, 2021
Quoting: slaapliedjeSorry, I know this is WAY off topic!
No doubt. For the record, though, I totally agree with you.
metalinux 25 Nov, 2021
A new Linux user on KDE will much more likely be using the KDE Discover store to manage their software, as opposed to the terminal. From that standpoint, I can see why they implemented the change, so as to not brick their system.

However, for Linux power users who may be using the Discover Store, I can also see why this change is vexing. It is just another blocker; they know about the risks and what will happen to their system.

I think the best way forward is to do what Linux does best: choice. Add an option to the Discover Store that says "I know what I'm doing to my system, please don't bother me" and that keeps both newer and more experienced users happy.
Eike 25 Nov, 2021
Quoting: metalinuxA new Linux user on KDE will much more likely be using the KDE Discover store to manage their software, as opposed to the terminal. From that standpoint, I can see why they implemented the change, so as to not brick their system.

However, for Linux power users who may be using the Discover Store, I can also see why this change is vexing. It is just another blocker; they know about the risks and what will happen to their system.

I think the best way forward is to do what Linux does best: choice. Add an option to the Discover Store that says "I know what I'm doing to my system, please don't bother me" and that keeps both newer and more experienced users happy.

Yes, but GUI programs probably should default to not do things that feel like breaking the system to many users.
In command like tools, making the user type say "Yes, I want to break my system" should be enough.
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