We do often include affiliate links to earn us some pennies. See more here.

AMD FidelityFX Super Resolution 3 (FSR3) is now open source

By - | Views: 65,630

As promised, AMD FidelityFX Super Resolution 3 is now open source under the MIT license and available for all developers to look into and add into their games. Currently though, this initial open source release only includes support for DirectX 12, as Vulkan support is "in development and will be released in a future version".

More about it:

AMD FidelityFX™ Super Resolution 3 (FSR 3) technology uses a combination of super resolution temporal upscaling technology and frame generation to deliver a massive increase in framerates in supported games.

AMD FSR 3 technology extends upon FSR 2’s upscaling by adding Frame Generation – the ability to generate entirely new game frames and present those to the user to improve FPS. FSR 3 does this by adding two new technologies – Frame Interpolation and Optical Flow enhanced from AMD Fluid Motion Frames.

Some nice improvements arrived with FSR3 v3.0.3 including quality improvements and extends support for Variable Refresh Rate (VRR) monitors within the frame pacing logic.

More games are confirmed to be getting FSR3 too with Avatar: Frontiers of Pandora recently released with it. Other games that will get support for it include Eve Online, Farming Simulator 22, Squad, Warhammer Darktide, Space Marine II, Starfield, Starship Troopers Extermination, Cyberpunk 2077, Crimson Desert, Black Myth: Wukong, The Alters, Like a Dragon: Infinite Wealth and Pax Dei.

See their announcement blog, FSR3 page and the GitHub - currently FSR3 on GitHub is in its own special branch.

Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
37 Likes
About the author -
author picture
I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly. Find me on Mastodon.
See more from me
8 comments

jordicoma Dec 14, 2023
Still, I did a quick look at the source at it seems that it doesn't support linux, and vulkan is in development.
Hope someone manage to compile on linux and vulkan works. (And even make an opengl backend if possible).
But releasing the code is one start.
Nocifer Dec 14, 2023
Quoting: jordicomaStill, I did a quick look at the source at it seems that it doesn't support linux, and vulkan is in development.
Hope someone manage to compile on linux and vulkan works. (And even make an opengl backend if possible).
But releasing the code is one start.

Well, it's a new technology that was also obviously rushed out the door before it was ready, back in October, so it makes sense that it's still missing bits and pieces and is for the time being focused on the most prevalent graphics stack first, i.e. DX12. Vulkan being in active development is enough for me.

I'm crossing my fingers that it will be possible to compile it as a DLL and so add unofficial FSR3 support to already existing games, like we can do with DLSS. And of course, that it will actually become usable in Wine in no more than a year from now (AFAIK, Proton devs have stated that FSR2 required work from AMD devs in order to build support for it in Proton, which probably means FSR3 will also need resources from an already resource-limited AMD).
Shmerl Dec 14, 2023
Quoting: NociferI'm crossing my fingers that it will be possible to compile it as a DLL and so add unofficial FSR3 support to already existing games, like we can do with DLSS.

I don't think it's possible without games actually using it directly. How would temporal anti-aliasing work otherwise? It's not a post processing filter like let's say vkbasalt.


Last edited by Shmerl on 14 December 2023 at 9:23 pm UTC
TheRiddick Dec 15, 2023
I hear Avatar is the first good demo of this technology in use. The previous 2 games had some problems.
Eri Dec 15, 2023
I've been looking in to this a little and looks like the only APUs supported are the 7000 series. I know that using it to go from 30-40 fps to 60 creates too much input lag, but I thought it could be interesting to use it to go from 60 to 90 fps on the Steam Deck Oled, but unless they expand the supported hardware, looks like it won't happend.
Calinou Dec 15, 2023
Quoting: EriI've been looking in to this a little and looks like the only APUs supported are the 7000 series. I know that using it to go from 30-40 fps to 60 creates too much input lag, but I thought it could be interesting to use it to go from 60 to 90 fps on the Steam Deck Oled, but unless they expand the supported hardware, looks like it won't happend.

Like upscaling, frame generation itself has some overhead. It's generally too much to handle for IGPs that aren't at the very top like a Radeon 780M. This is more noticeable the higher your input framerate is, since you'll have even less time to generate a frame.

Even on a RTX 4090, there's a glass ceiling with DLSS FG where you can't really reach more than ~220 FPS consistently no matter how lightweight the scene is.


Last edited by Calinou on 15 December 2023 at 12:54 pm UTC
Shmerl Dec 16, 2023
Quoting: GuestYou can generate motion vector data just like how video codecs do. Nvidia also has a sdk specifically for this (nvidia optical flow). I know that it has been used to add motion blur. I dont know how good it would look in practice for FSR3, it would depend on the type of game. It would be interesting to see somebody try it, especially as this can be done with the video encoding unit which is separate from the gpu so it shouldn't really affect performance of the game.

Edit: it seems like FSR 3 already has an option for this and is likely how they add FSR 3 to all games on windows with AMD hypr-rx. So technically it should also be possible to do this on linux too, in proton maybe.

I mean, to do it you need a sample over time. How are you going to do it from a single frame? So the game has to feed it to the library. Post processing filters that can be used without game's involvement work with a single frame.


Last edited by Shmerl on 16 December 2023 at 10:43 pm UTC
rustigsmed Dec 18, 2023
you can download demo versions of Forspoken and Immortals of Aveum which were the first 2 to have FSR3.

Enabling FSR frame generation appears to work for Immortals of Aveum. For example it goes from about ~85fps and jumps up to ~122fps using native AA fsr settings w/FG (no upscaling). feel free to try it for yourself (free demo)!. I couldn't get it working for Forspoken (but have heard that it is possible - not so for avatar).


Last edited by rustigsmed on 18 December 2023 at 3:38 am UTC
While you're here, please consider supporting GamingOnLinux on:

Reward Tiers: Patreon. Plain Donations: PayPal.

This ensures all of our main content remains totally free for everyone! Patreon supporters can also remove all adverts and sponsors! Supporting us helps bring good, fresh content. Without your continued support, we simply could not continue!

You can find even more ways to support us on this dedicated page any time. If you already are, thank you!
Login / Register


Or login with...
Sign in with Steam Sign in with Google
Social logins require cookies to stay logged in.