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The Witcher 2: current performance?
Appelsin commented on 22 March 2018 at 4:59 pm UTC

Okay, thanks, I'll be sure to update to a newer version as soon as I get home.

From what I'm reading now, searching for Mesa, I get the impression that whichever version of Mesa that is -it- when shipping a new version of Ubuntu, is the one you're stuck with. Is this correct? Or are they just really conservative with sending new versions to users via offical Ubuntu channels?

Appelsin commented on 23 March 2018 at 1:06 pm UTC

Guest
AppelsinOkay, thanks, I'll be sure to update to a newer version as soon as I get home.

From what I'm reading now, searching for Mesa, I get the impression that whichever version of Mesa that is -it- when shipping a new version of Ubuntu, is the one you're stuck with. Is this correct? Or are they just really conservative with sending new versions to users via offical Ubuntu channels?

Not true. You can add a PPA to get a much newer version of Mesa. The most well known one is Padoka.

I'll try rephrasing my question What I'm wondering is whether or not Ubuntu is pushing updates to Mesa via the default channels, i.e. normal updates, or if they only update it once (or twice) a year, with each x.04 (and x.10) release, i.e. "whichever Mesa is current when Canonical ships e.g. 17.10 is the version which you'll have until you upgrade to 18.04, unless you actively add a PPA such as Padoka or x-swat to get the latest updates".

PS: In other news, I'm able to run Witcher 2 on ultra on my Macbook (though I didn't try with Ubersampling enabled), which suggests that my PC should handle it like cake. Also, I'm very happy to report, Witcher 2 has managed to actually sync Steam Cloud Save from Linux to Mac! And with a Flatpak Steam at that

Shmerl commented on 23 March 2018 at 1:10 pm UTC

AppelsinWhat I'm wondering is whether or not Ubuntu is pushing updates to Mesa via the default channels, i.e. normal updates

I think they don't do it well enough, that's why people rely on external repos. If you want to have up to date Mesa automatically, I recommend not to use Ubuntu to begin with, but to use a rolling distro.

Take a look also how to build Mesa yourself, and use it without disrupting system installed package: https://www.gamingonlinux.com/wiki/Building_Mesa_from_source

Shmerl commented on 23 March 2018 at 7:09 pm UTC

GuestI dont recommend using a rolling distro just to get newer Mesa. Mesa can and does break, and with a rolling distro you are stuck with it.

Not necessarily. I'm not using system Mesa for most games, see link above. But most of the time things work with system Mesa anyway, so rolling distro takes care to update it seamlessly, unlike Ubuntu which requires jumping through hoops to have Mesa up to date.

tuubi commented on 23 March 2018 at 8:49 pm UTC

Shmerl
GuestI dont recommend using a rolling distro just to get newer Mesa. Mesa can and does break, and with a rolling distro you are stuck with it.

Not necessarily. I'm not using system Mesa for most games, see link above. But most of the time things work with system Mesa anyway, so rolling distro takes care to update it seamlessly, unlike Ubuntu which requires jumping through hoops to have Mesa up to date.
Adding a PPA is a single command. Or a minute of puttering around in the update manager for those who are allergic to terminals. Hardly jumping through hoops.

There are valid reasons to run a rolling distro (as if reasons are needed if that's what you want to do), but purely for gaming you're likely better off running a distro that games officially support.

I'm not trying to start a debate here. I'm trying to point out that telling someone he's using the wrong distro is rarely helpful.

mirv commented on 24 March 2018 at 1:39 pm UTC

So I played a few minutes on a Kaveri without trouble. I'll play a bit more when I have more time. Ok, it wasn't silky smooth, but it wasn't a slide show either. I didn't have an fps counter running, but it "felt" like around 30fps, and that was consistent. No extra jittery moments or anything.

And the controller worked flawlessly.

Given the, uh, troubles at initial release and compared to now, the difference is just amazing. It's a combination of Mesa maturity and eON improvements since release. To install the game and have it just fire up and play like that on a Kaveri, well that's awesome.

Leopard commented on 24 March 2018 at 11:31 pm UTC

Gtx 1050 4 gb , i7 7700 HQ

renderer: OGL 3.2
Everything is set to high settings , not ultra.

Mostly 60 fps.

Appelsin commented on 3 April 2018 at 5:08 am UTC

Updated to Mesa 18.1 via the Padoka PPA, and let's just say it was quite a lot better!
Still says OpenGL 3.1 though. Is this something I ought to update as well? And if so, how?

(And, does anyone know if mods work with the Linux version?)

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