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CONSCRIPT from Jordan Mochi/ Catchweight Studio and publisher Team17 is a promising looking first world war survival-horror that was crowdfunded back in 2020. Now the developer has cancelled the planned Linux and macOS versions.

"CONSCRIPT is an upcoming survival horror game inspired by classics of the genre - set in 1916 during the Great War. CONSCRIPT will blend all the punishing mechanics of older horror games into a cohesive, tense, and unique experience. In CONSCRIPT, you play as a French soldier searching for his missing-in-action brother during the Battle of Verdun. Will you be able to search twisted trenches, navigate overrun forts, and cross no-mans-land to find him, and ensure a home goes unbroken?"

Since getting a press email about a new demo arriving, and remembering following this along during the Kickstarter, I shot off a message to their PR team a few days ago, and today they got back in touch and the developer has now also published a post directly on Kickstarter where they said:

Linux and Mac Notice

Linux and Mac versions were part of the original Kickstarter campaign, and unfortunately I have to announce that these two platforms will no longer be natively supported. Back during the Kickstarter campaign in 2020 I naively promised things that I had never done before and so I did not realize how much work they were for so little trade off. For me to support these versions, I would likely lose money because the user base is just not there (both of these platforms account for roughly 0.6% of all my Steam wishlists).

Massive apologies for this cancellation, although I hope the announcement of the game on all these other platforms at least softens the blow a little bit.

If you were an original Kickstarter backer who was expecting a Mac or Linux version, feel free to reach out to me via Kickstarter DM and I can organize a refund for you out of pocket.

The wording is a bit odd there with the developer saying it will be "out of pocket". Well, people gave their money to the project for something it's not doing now. So it's only natural to return it. Kickstarter though is very much a gamble on if you like the idea enough.

Sad to see for backers of the project, much like what we saw with Nightdive Studios remaked of System Shock doing the same. We also saw the developer of Blazerush recently announce their ending of Linux and macOS support too. Once again, for macOS it's a bigger loss, since they get nothing, but at least for Linux players (and Steam Deck) it should hopefully be playable with Proton.

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CONSCRIPT will be available on GOG and Steam.

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rhavenn May 30
Quoting: Cyril
QuoteBack during the Kickstarter campaign in 2020 I naively promised things that I had never done before and so I did not realize how much work they were for so little trade off.

Wow! "Are you kidding me?", It's really shameful. I suspect this is the case for a majority of KS campaigns...

Yeah, if you build a Windows game and expect to just push a few buttons at the end to make it work on Linux or MacOS you're going to have a bad time. If you build from day 1 for it to work on all 3 platforms then it's much easier. Frankly, this just sounds to me like the dev has no clue on how to develop a game and I wouldn't trust his Windows code either. Probably totally un-optimized shit with copy / pasta code chunks all over that he pulled from StackOverflow.

However, KickStarter..not even once. I'll give you my money once you release the game UNLESS you have a decent track record and history of releasing solid Linux support and even then I'll just do the EA version on Steam if it's available.


Last edited by rhavenn on 30 May 2024 at 4:04 pm UTC
slaapliedje May 30
Quoting: M@GOidAnd one more time, don't pre-order anything. The warnings are there for anyone to see.
Yeah, I have given up on backing any video games at all on kickstarter. The only things I consistently back (because they consistently deliver) is anything by Gaming Ballistics LLC, and SJGames. They both are excellent at delivering within the same year, usually. Any others seem to not have the basic development even started, so it takes years to show up at my door...

Hell, even ordering something from Limited Run games... I ordered Maniac Mansion and Zak McKracken at the same time, a friend of mine ordered the latter, and it already showed up. It took them longer to get Maniac Mansion put together... but last I checked (a few days ago) it said it was ready to ship... but hadn't shipped. Not even a kickstarter, but a pre-order issue... Once a company has your money, the incentive for delivering the goods seems to diminish...
Viesta2015 May 30
lol another crappy game i wont play... and another crappy company i wont buy from... i need to figure out how to block this stuff on steam.
dibz May 30
I mean, people need to remember that Kickstarter isn't a store. When you send money you haven't bought anything really, not in the sense that it's for goods anyway.

No, what you're really doing is something closer to gambling. Could be Gatcha and you get something else, could be something less then you expected for your tier level at the higher-stakes table, might be exactly what you hoped and you "win", might be nothing at all and you "lose". Might take 10 years instead of 6 months. Point is, all of these should be expected potential outcomes. It's a gamble, and if you're not comfortable with it, pay for it when it comes out instead. A lot of projects don't even give discounts to backers anymore and you're basically paying retail/pre-order prices for games that aren't even made yet.

Stretch goals for Linux/Mac should almost never be believed. I can practically guarantee the majority of the ones that promise that as stretch goals are vaguely aware that Unity, or .Net whatever, and/or their engine of choice has "linux" support and think that with some extra effort they could figure out how to build for the extra platforms. They don't realize until mid-development that that was a bad assumption and that they needed to target the other platforms from the beginning so they make better, more compatible, choices. Frankly, some of the blame absolutely lies with engines/frameworks that lead people to believe that in the first place. If you do want to believe it, it's probably best to pay attention whether the developer has a history of actually releasing things on those platforms.

Personally I do still use Kickstarter, but I back selectively and only when I'm of the mindset of wanting to support something. I would like a return, but I don't necessarily expect it - a little mental trick to "not be mad, bro". Though if they don't deliver, you can bet I wouldn't trust them again.
Kind of a stupid premise. Like, if I were in the trenches with this guy and he said he was going to go looking all over for his brother who was "missing in action" I'd tell him, "My friend, how long have you been here? He's not 'missing in action'. He's dead. What makes him 'missing' is that a shell hit where he was and they couldn't find any recognizable pieces. If you go wandering around the front instead of sitting tight and keeping your head down, you'll end up the same way and your family will have two less sons instead of one less. Unless they execute you for desertion when you leave your post. Just sit down. Look, I do feel bad about your brother--you can have a piece of my chocolate bar."
I have this feeling that there has been a shift over the years when it comes to this stuff. Some time ago, when someone cancelled their promise of a version of the game for an OS, they would just cancel the Linux version but they'd usually still do the Mac version. These days, they cancel Linux and MacOS if they're going to cancel at all. I'm not sure that's good, misery loves company maybe? but it's different.
rhavenn May 30
Quoting: Purple Library GuyKind of a stupid premise. Like, if I were in the trenches with this guy and he said he was going to go looking all over for his brother who was "missing in action" I'd tell him, "My friend, how long have you been here? He's not 'missing in action'. He's dead. What makes him 'missing' is that a shell hit where he was and they couldn't find any recognizable pieces. If you go wandering around the front instead of sitting tight and keeping your head down, you'll end up the same way and your family will have two less sons instead of one less. Unless they execute you for desertion when you leave your post. Just sit down. Look, I do feel bad about your brother--you can have a piece of my chocolate bar."

Haha. That version of the script for "Saving Private Ryan" was really not very good and failed to pull audiences in ;)
CatKiller May 30
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Quoting: Purple Library GuyI have this feeling that there has been a shift over the years when it comes to this stuff. Some time ago, when someone cancelled their promise of a version of the game for an OS, they would just cancel the Linux version but they'd usually still do the Mac version. These days, they cancel Linux and MacOS if they're going to cancel at all. I'm not sure that's good, misery loves company maybe? but it's different.

It's not really good, no. In the old days, avoiding platform-specific lock-in and having an OpenGL render path got you Linux and Mac. Ditching Linux but keeping Mac was a specific "we love those turtle necks, but fuck those weirdy-beardy Linux folks." Now, Mac work doesn't help Linux work at all - if you can avoid single-platform stuff and use Vulkan for both Windows and Linux you still need an entirely separate render path for Mac. And Mac has a smaller share than Linux. Making a Mac build but not a Linux build (which people still do) is quite misguided. So we get "fuck those weirdy-beardy Linux folks, and fuck those turtle necks: we're perfectly comfortable with Microsoft having a monopoly on the platform we can be bothered with" instead. Macs using Vulkan and not destroying their share of the gaming market would have been much better for us.
slaapliedje May 30
Quoting: Purple Library GuyI have this feeling that there has been a shift over the years when it comes to this stuff. Some time ago, when someone cancelled their promise of a version of the game for an OS, they would just cancel the Linux version but they'd usually still do the Mac version. These days, they cancel Linux and MacOS if they're going to cancel at all. I'm not sure that's good, misery loves company maybe? but it's different.
I have a growing theory that a lot of these are actually being canceled by publishers who want deals with Microsoft or Sony... The amusing thing is that Linux users/developers have worked their way around such exclusivity with Wine based solutions. Apple on the other hand... basically depend on those same Wine-devs even to the point to incorporate Crossover into their Game Porting Tool (or whatever that thing is called).

I recently was having the conversation about Valheim, which is apparently developed on a Linux system (which explains why it supports OpenGL or Vulkan) and there is no Mac version. After Apple dropped all 32bit support and more or less killed support for vast swaths of games with that move, I can't imagine anyone else really trusts Apple to do good for gamers in general. So, it's no surprise that publishers/devs are dropping Mac support. They also figure 'Proton will let Linux users play the game' which is why some believe Proton is dangerous to the Linux ecosystem. I think Proton serves it's purpose (as older games for sure would never be ported) but I still maintain most newer games should be cross-platform.
slaapliedje May 30
Quoting: CatKiller
Quoting: Purple Library GuyI have this feeling that there has been a shift over the years when it comes to this stuff. Some time ago, when someone cancelled their promise of a version of the game for an OS, they would just cancel the Linux version but they'd usually still do the Mac version. These days, they cancel Linux and MacOS if they're going to cancel at all. I'm not sure that's good, misery loves company maybe? but it's different.

It's not really good, no. In the old days, avoiding platform-specific lock-in and having an OpenGL render path got you Linux and Mac. Ditching Linux but keeping Mac was a specific "we love those turtle necks, but fuck those weirdy-beardy Linux folks." Now, Mac work doesn't help Linux work at all - if you can avoid single-platform stuff and use Vulkan for both Windows and Linux you still need an entirely separate render path for Mac. And Mac has a smaller share than Linux. Making a Mac build but not a Linux build (which people still do) is quite misguided. So we get "fuck those weirdy-beardy Linux folks, and fuck those turtle necks: we're perfectly comfortable with Microsoft having a monopoly on the platform we can be bothered with" instead. Macs using Vulkan and not destroying their share of the gaming market would have been much better for us.
Tack onto that the move to ARM for Macs... so not only have they isolated themselves by not supporting Vulkan/OpenGL anymore, but currently supporting two architectures... Plus their ditching of 32bit kind of lends itself to believing that Apple will just drop some other support (like X86_64) some point soon, and you have developers just not wanting to support it.

At this point, supporting a Mac is probably similar to trying to support your game on the Switch, or PS5, etc. But at least the PS5/Xbox is still the same architecture as most computers.
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