Confused on Steam Play and Proton? Be sure to check out our guide.

Proton compatibility with Windows games is going to be an ongoing improvement for many years, and Proton Experimental is where all the latest comes in first for Linux and Steam Deck.

Every so often, Valve updates Proton Experimental with fixes that need a little more testing before rolling out to the main version of Proton for everyone. As of March 10, here's what's new and changed:

  • Now playable: A Way Out.
  • Fix garbled videos in Rustler.
  • Fix VR Chat not handling suspend / resume well.
  • Fix Vampyr and The Beast Inside displaying menus a few pixels wide on Steam Decks.
  • Fix Apex Legends sometimes starting minimized on Steam Decks.
  • Fix Quake Live being unable to connect to multiplayer matches.
  • Fix Killing Floor 2 not connecting to the item server.
  • Fix Xbox login window lagging with updating window's content.
  • Update dxvk-nvapi* to v0.5.3.

*DXVK-NVAPI is what provides the likes of NVIDIA DLSS, NVIDIA Reflex (by using LatencyFleX), NVIDIA PhysX and more to Linux with DXVK and VKD3D-Proton.

Changelog can be seen on GitHub.

Need to know how to switch to Proton Experimental on a Steam Deck? Here's how:

YouTube Thumbnail
YouTube videos require cookies, you must accept their cookies to view. View cookie preferences.
Accept Cookies & Show   Direct Link

Many more Steam Deck Guides available on a dedicated YouTube Playlist.

Text guide (Steam Deck):

  • Pick a game and head to the little COG icon on the right.
  • Click Properties, then Compatibility on the left.
  • Make sure the tickbox is done, then select it from the dropdown.

On a Linux desktop:

  • Right click a game, go to Properties.
  • Compatibility on the left.
  • Make sure the tickbox is done, then select it from the dropdown.
Article taken from GamingOnLinux.com.
15 Likes
We do often include affiliate links to earn us some pennies. We are currently affiliated with GOG and Humble Store. See more here.
About the author -
author picture
I am the owner of GamingOnLinux. After discovering Linux back in the days of Mandrake in 2003, I constantly came back to check on the progress of Linux until Ubuntu appeared on the scene and it helped me to really love it. You can reach me easily by emailing GamingOnLinux directly.
See more from me
5 comments

jens 11 Mar
  • Supporter
QuoteDXVK-NVAPI is what provides the likes of NVIDIA DLSS, NVIDIA Reflex (by using LatencyFleX), NVIDIA PhysX and more to Linux with DXVK and VKD3D-Proton.

To clarify, DXVK-NVAPI is actually pretty thin and is mostly about providing a few NVAPI methods for GPU topology and forwarding entry points into other libraries. The actual DLSS calls are forwarded into DXVK and VKD3D-Proton which forwards things into the NVIDIA driver. Same for Reflex, as you stated, the actual work is done by LatencyFlex. PhysX also still happens in the PhysX runtime, DXVK-NVAPI only implements a few methods that are used to query PhysX capabilities for the present GPU.


Last edited by jens on 11 March 2022 at 7:38 am UTC
Liam Dawe 11 Mar
Quoting: jens
QuoteDXVK-NVAPI is what provides the likes of NVIDIA DLSS, NVIDIA Reflex (by using LatencyFleX), NVIDIA PhysX and more to Linux with DXVK and VKD3D-Proton.

To clarify, DXVK-NVAPI is actually pretty thin and is mostly about providing a few NVAPI methods for GPU topology and forwarding entry points into other libraries. The actual DLSS calls are forwarded into DXVK and VKD3D-Proton which forwards things into the NVIDIA driver. Same for Reflex, as you stated, the actual work is done by LatencyFlex. PhysX also still happens in the PhysX runtime, DXVK-NVAPI only implements a few methods that are used to query PhysX capabilities for the present GPU.
Thanks but really the point remains the same, it's what enables it to happen. Not that it specifically does it all directly.


Last edited by Liam Dawe on 11 March 2022 at 7:56 am UTC
jens 11 Mar
  • Supporter
Quoting: Liam Dawe
Quoting: jens
QuoteDXVK-NVAPI is what provides the likes of NVIDIA DLSS, NVIDIA Reflex (by using LatencyFleX), NVIDIA PhysX and more to Linux with DXVK and VKD3D-Proton.

To clarify, DXVK-NVAPI is actually pretty thin and is mostly about providing a few NVAPI methods for GPU topology and forwarding entry points into other libraries. The actual DLSS calls are forwarded into DXVK and VKD3D-Proton which forwards things into the NVIDIA driver. Same for Reflex, as you stated, the actual work is done by LatencyFlex. PhysX also still happens in the PhysX runtime, DXVK-NVAPI only implements a few methods that are used to query PhysX capabilities for the present GPU.
Thanks but really the point remains the same, it's what enables it to happen. Not that it specifically does it all directly.

Yeah, sure, it is certainly one part of the puzzle. Just wanted to clarify that it is a relatively small piece compared to the main projects and to ensure that credits go where the actual magic has happened.
Baduk 11 Mar
Since this update with vilkan 1.3 ans Mesa 22, Apex on my computer (3600X et 6600 XT) the pc goes from 45-50 frames per second to 70-85.

Big update for me this week !
I might have to reinstall Elden Ring to see if it works now…I'm experiencing the apparently common "white screen then crash" since I last tried.
While you're here, please consider supporting GamingOnLinux on:

Reward Tiers: Patreon. Plain Donations: Liberapay or PayPal.

This ensures all of our main content remains totally free for everyone with no article paywalls. We also don't have tons of adverts, there's also no tracking and we respect your privacy. Just good, fresh content. Without your continued support, we simply could not continue!

You can find even more ways to support us on this dedicated page any time. If you already are, thank you!
Login / Register

Or login with...
Sign in with Steam Sign in with Twitter Sign in with Google
Social logins require cookies to stay logged in.