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Latest Comments by Purple Library Guy
Möbius Front '83 is a tactical turn-based strategy game from Zachtronics
27 October 2020 at 6:50 am UTC

I've always felt that the only country that poses a really serious threat to the United States of America is . . . The United States of America. Not in this particular way, but still it's oddly a propos.

Microsoft Edge now available on Linux in Preview
27 October 2020 at 6:45 am UTC

Quoting: ageresPDF files aren't meant to be edited, and for creating e-books from scans there is DVJU. People sending you PDFs should send images instead.
Well they won't. How about I stand on principle and refuse to do my job?

Microsoft Edge now available on Linux in Preview
27 October 2020 at 12:28 am UTC

Quoting: ShabbyX
Quoting: Purple Library GuyClose graphical viewer software because you can't wrangle the thing with another tool while you have the file open

I get your point about cli and it's valid, but FYI, this is not windows, you *can* modify files while they are open :) last I did this kind of work I could leave evince open with the file and it automatically refreshed it when I changed the file.
Oooh, that's interesting.

Microsoft Edge now available on Linux in Preview
27 October 2020 at 12:26 am UTC

Quoting: whizseTry ScanTailor, it's not an all-in-one tool, it doesn't do scanning, OCR or PDF output. But it is excellent for doing the intermediary steps. Cropping, deskewing, prepping for OCR etc. in batch mode, with a GUI.

It's a little bit fiddly the first time around, but it has quickly become indispensable to me when it comes to wrangling scanned books and documents.

Another suggestion, for batch cropping with a GUI, or any other image edits on large sets of files. Try Darktable. It's primarily for RAW images, but does jpeg just as well.
I'll have a look. Although really what I'm working with is generally files that are already .pdf when I receive them. It really seems like software on Linux for manipulating .pdf files is pretty limited--and of course Adobe never port anything to Linux unless they can do it in a half-assed way that leaves Linux a second-class citizen.

Microsoft Edge now available on Linux in Preview
26 October 2020 at 8:52 am UTC

Quoting: dvd
Quoting: Purple Library Guy
Quoting: ShabbyX
Quoting: Purple Library GuyGIMP for cropping pages, one at a time, pdfshuffler for sticking pages together and so forth

Take a look at pdftk(1)
I looked it up. It's a command-line tool.
I don't want to be using more command line tools, I want to be using fewer of them--fewer tools period, in fact, I want to be using one piece of graphical software. Command line tools for fiddling with visual things is a fundamentally stupid idea anyway. The sequence then goes

Open graphical viewer software, look at visual thing, figure out what you want to do with it --> Close graphical viewer software because you can't wrangle the thing with another tool while you have the file open --> Use command-line tool --> Open graphical viewer software; discover that you didn't do what you wanted to do --> Close it again --> Use command-line tool --> Open graphical viewer software; maybe it worked this time, figure out the next thing you want to do with the visual thing . . .

This is a broken idea. And I can't even imagine how I'm supposed to crop pages I can't even look at while I'm cropping them. Just no. Maybe they're useful if you have ten thousand things and you want to do the same simple thing to all of them so you can use the command line tool to batch them, but that is not a normal situation.

I'm not familiar with your workflow, but if you are doing your own scanning simple-scan let's you crop and export to pdf (although I've never used it for documents larger than 40-50 pages myself so i'm not sure how prone it is to crash with larger documents). If you get your scans in image formats, i think convert will be also a fast way to to join them all in a pdf, and it's probably installed on your computer already if you have imagemagick on it.
I could scan things at home potentially, but the things I would scan aren't at home so it doesn't come up. If I go in to work to scan them, I can use Acrobat at work. So when I'm fiddling with scan files at home it's generally something I'm receiving (I got someone at work to do the scan, or I got a file via interlibrary loan, or a course instructor scanned it and sent it to me, or something) and it's already a .pdf.
So, nice ideas but not really applicable to my situation.

Microsoft Edge now available on Linux in Preview
25 October 2020 at 5:45 pm UTC

Quoting: ShabbyX
Quoting: Purple Library GuyGIMP for cropping pages, one at a time, pdfshuffler for sticking pages together and so forth

Take a look at pdftk(1)
I looked it up. It's a command-line tool.
I don't want to be using more command line tools, I want to be using fewer of them--fewer tools period, in fact, I want to be using one piece of graphical software. Command line tools for fiddling with visual things is a fundamentally stupid idea anyway. The sequence then goes

Open graphical viewer software, look at visual thing, figure out what you want to do with it --> Close graphical viewer software because you can't wrangle the thing with another tool while you have the file open --> Use command-line tool --> Open graphical viewer software; discover that you didn't do what you wanted to do --> Close it again --> Use command-line tool --> Open graphical viewer software; maybe it worked this time, figure out the next thing you want to do with the visual thing . . .

This is a broken idea. And I can't even imagine how I'm supposed to crop pages I can't even look at while I'm cropping them. Just no. Maybe they're useful if you have ten thousand things and you want to do the same simple thing to all of them so you can use the command line tool to batch them, but that is not a normal situation.

According to a Stadia developer, streamers should be paying publishers and it backfired
25 October 2020 at 5:18 pm UTC

Quoting: jo3fis
Quoting: Purple Library Guy
Quoting: jo3fis
Quoting: einherjarAnd there the typical Internet Drama of these days is seen again (Twitter "outrage" etc.)

Calm down, he has an opinion and it is different from what the most people think about that topic. So what?

My thoughts exactly. Everyone needs to calm down.
I haven't actually noticed anyone foaming at the mouth. You want everyone stoned out on laudanum or what?

Well that would be a welcome improvement for a lot of people 🤣

How can we deploy this on a mass scale?
Maybe you need to calm down.

According to a Stadia developer, streamers should be paying publishers and it backfired
24 October 2020 at 11:21 pm UTC Likes: 3

Quoting: jo3fis
Quoting: einherjarAnd there the typical Internet Drama of these days is seen again (Twitter "outrage" etc.)

Calm down, he has an opinion and it is different from what the most people think about that topic. So what?

My thoughts exactly. Everyone needs to calm down.
I haven't actually noticed anyone foaming at the mouth. You want everyone stoned out on laudanum or what?

Microsoft Edge now available on Linux in Preview
24 October 2020 at 11:10 pm UTC Likes: 2

Quoting: AciDNow, do the same with Excel and Powerpoint (and perhaps even Word).
No need for edge when you already have Firefox/Chromium, while on the other hand in a work environment, having Excel and Powerpoint is essential.
Depends on the work environment. I've never actually used Powerpoint at work in 30+ years. And I've been working from home for months and never had a reason to wish my LibreOffice Calc was Excel. I know there are features Excel has that some people need, but just to use it as a spreadsheet . . . nope.

Adobe stuff has actually been a bigger problem for me. Like wrangling .pdf files; I have in the end been able to do everything I needed to do so far without Acrobat, but it's been clumsy and I've had to use different things for different stuff--GIMP for cropping pages, one at a time, pdfshuffler for sticking pages together and so forth, and I actually ended up using a command line thing, ocrmypdf, to OCR a scanned file (to be fair to ocrmypdf, it worked like a charm). This is not an ideal situation.

You can now order a PC case that looks like the classic Commodore 64
24 October 2020 at 5:13 am UTC Likes: 1

Quoting: Valck
Quoting: Dunc
Quoting: EikeNothing compared to the "chewing gum" keyboard of the Sinclair (ZX 81 or Spectrum, not sure anymore)...!
The original Spectrum had the “dead flesh” board. Later versions had an improved one with plastic keycaps. I believe Sir Clive actually held patents on rubber-sprung keyboards, and gathered massive licencing fees from the likes of Dell in the '90s. His own company's efforts, being early, were pretty awful though.

The ZX81... oh, dear. It was a keycap-less membrane, marketed as “touch sensitive”. I guess if you “touched” it with a hammer...
Believe it or not, I actually liked both of these–the membrane for its literal flexibility, see post above, and the chiclet for its ergonomic improvement upon the membrane :D

What made them bearable was the way Sinclair implemented their BASIC interpreter to accept single key strokes as keyword tokens, thereby reducing the need for typing every letter in a command, and at the same time reducing the memory requirements for program code too.

Of course people hate that too when they are unfamiliar with how that works, but if you grew up with no preconditioning, it was an awesome system–besides, you had all the BASIC commands printed right there in front of you, so you never had to look up anything in the manuals.

And don't get me started about MANUALS!
They were really well-written, comprehensive, educational text books, not some shoddy three "page" PDF you get these days, IF you are lucky...
Yeah, the manual that came with my (well, my dad's) TRS-80 model I had a solid overview of basic BASIC programming. In an approachable style, with a little cartoon of the computer making chatty comments. Also, when you turned the thing on it was instantly on, like turning on a . . . uh . . . what turns on instantly these days? A light, I guess.