Support us on Patreon to keep GamingOnLinux alive. This ensures we have no timed articles and no paywalls. Just good, fresh content! Alternatively, you can donate through PayPal, Flattr, Liberapay or Buy us a Coffee. You can also buy games using our partner links for GOG and Humble Store.
Latest Comments by Alloc
7 Days to Die 'Alpha 19 Experimental' is out with HD Zombies
30 June 2020 at 11:32 am UTC

Quoting: Liam DaweAs for Vulkan, I assume that's because Unity's Vulkan renderer in the Unity version used by 7 Days to Die was still rough.
In my experience it already became quite a bit more solid with the update to 2019.2 in A19.

7 Days to Die 'Alpha 19 Experimental' is out with HD Zombies
30 June 2020 at 10:39 am UTC

Seriously Liam? The Food and Health bars made it into your top 5 of changes? ;D


Quoting: SolitaryI don't think the Dynamic Music System is working in Linux,
Yes, it's still disabled in Linux due to the mentioned crash. Actually I'm not sure if we can't work around that though and as the DMS is more "important" now I'll have a look myself ... Linux users would be missing out quite a big part otherwise :(

Quoting: SolitaryDid someone manage to run it with Vulkan without constant crashes? Specifically Nvidia, but I wonder how AMD works too.
Seems to really depend on the GPU/driver combination, some play without issues (and obviously better performance than GLCore) for hours, some crash all the time.

Wine (so Proton eventually) takes another step towards Easy Anti-Cheat working
26 June 2020 at 11:26 am UTC Likes: 5

Quoting: TheSHEEEP
Quoting: Ehvis
Quoting: Perkeleen_VittupääWhat's good too, is that it's not an actual kernel driver with root permissions?

This driver seems running in user mode so it thinks it is in the kernel, but actually in a user mode process.

It can also be seen as bad. This effectively means that EAC is being kept happy while it's not being able to what is happening on the system. If it is now possible to create some sort of cheat outside of wine, then it would essentially an exploit. If this is possible on Linux, it would be possible on Windows as well. At best EAC would try to fix that. At worst, they decide that they might switch to more drastic options. While it's pretty cool that they managed it this far, I'm still not hopeful for the future.
I feel the same.
From a technical perspective, this is pretty amazing.
But it really doesn't solve the problem in a way that would make EAC happy, does it? It isn't hard to imagine Wine keeping EAC happy, while you run something else neither Wine nor EAC has access to on your machine.
In the end, it would probably only serve to increase the pressure on anti-cheat devs to either fully support or fully block Linux.

And I don't think any of us would like the result of that decision, at least not at the current market share.
Asked EAC what their thoughts are on this. I fear the same as Ehvis, namely that this is basically a working EAC bypass that needs to be fixed instead of supported.

Also note that EAC *does* fully support Linux. There are games that do that just fine, only game devs that don't care about releasing for Linux are affected as Wine is what's not supported, as that's "neither" Linux nor Windows. I suppose the only way EAC *could* be supported in Wine would be if EAC designed an EAC client module specifically for that purpose, that's basically closer to the Linux module but interacting with the Windows runtime of the game.

Seems Valve do intend to go back to SteamOS at some point
26 March 2020 at 3:50 pm UTC Likes: 3

Besides the issue of no security updates on SmartTVs it's also simply an issue of not getting new apps either. Our Panasonic will probably never support Disney+ as an example (actually I think it never received *any* updates for any part of it since we got it like 5 years ago ...).

I consider SmartTVs to be similar to iMacs. While it's nice in the beginning to have a good working combination (and thus integration of both parts) of the content provider and the display unit after some time you got an outdated content provider but the display unit will be just fine for years. So screens are one thing where I don't want anything else to be integrated. Just give me proper interfaces to the outside (A/V) and that's it.

Seems Valve do intend to go back to SteamOS at some point
25 March 2020 at 10:22 am UTC Likes: 1

Having a full-featured open source "console" desktop from Steam would be cool imo. So not only Steam's BPM but something that resembles consoles more. Supporting streaming services in the interface (Amazon, Netflix, Spotify etc ...), playing videos from the local network, maybe support for Plex. So that you could really use that thing as a TV box and not have to hop around different interfaces for everything but games. Maybe they'll get there ...

Either way I wouldn't care about the underlying distribution ... the SteamOS thing (for me) should just work as-is, I wouldn't use that for desktops anyway.

Unity 2019.3 is now out - adds Google Stadia support and IL2CPP on Linux
29 January 2020 at 5:41 pm UTC

That's not a bug report but a feature request. Have fun doing so, as if Unity Tech would listen to what their customers need (especially if it's not mobile related)...

Unity 2019.3 is now out - adds Google Stadia support and IL2CPP on Linux
29 January 2020 at 5:36 pm UTC

Nope, it's just the command line argument you named. That's why I said "launcher", your game could write its own settings file that a launcher reads and automatically pass the correct argument when launching.

Unity 2019.3 is now out - adds Google Stadia support and IL2CPP on Linux
29 January 2020 at 5:33 pm UTC

Quoting: Shmerl
Quoting: Alloc
Quoting: ShmerlCheck for example Hedon. It's using OpenGL by default, but Vulkan is right there in the graphics options.
Curious, you mean graphic options as in before the game itself launches (like in a game launcher) or really within the game?
Within the game settings UI itself, you can choose OpenGL or Vulkan (and it defaults to OpenGL). Since what renderer to use is Unity setting, you can just expose it your game settings UI.
Well, it's not *that* simple ;)
They most likely still have an external launcher (visible to the user or not), because you can only change the used renderer with a command line argument.

Unity 2019.3 is now out - adds Google Stadia support and IL2CPP on Linux
29 January 2020 at 5:21 pm UTC Likes: 1

Quoting: ShmerlCheck for example Hedon. It's using OpenGL by default, but Vulkan is right there in the graphics options.
Curious, you mean graphic options as in before the game itself launches (like in a game launcher) or really within the game?

Unity 2019.3 is now out - adds Google Stadia support and IL2CPP on Linux
29 January 2020 at 3:51 pm UTC Likes: 1

Re: Vulkan:
I think mirv is pretty spot on: Currently it seems like it's very differently behaving depending on different parts of the equation, like GPU HW + driver, OS, etc.
Our game seems to run for some people with Vulkan just fine, for others it simply crashes. That's not depending on Windows vs Linux, not old GPU vs new or even the driver version, just "randomly" crashing or not. Could be Unity is (partially?) at fault by doing certain things the wrong way (both in shader code and how it talks to the GPU driver), but could just as well be totally on the GPU side of things ...

Quoting: Shmerl
Quoting: mirvSo the safest default from a risk vs reward standpoint is probably still OpenGL. For now.
That's not necessarily what the end user might want (possibly safest), if it costs performance.
Most people are frickin stupid. Sorry to be that blunt but that's just how it is. So if a user starts a game and it crashes he will not look for why it crashed, but he will give a negative review, spam twitter or what not just to tell everyone how the game is bugged, bad implemented or whatever :(


Re: IL2CPP:
Yet another thing Unity devs did just because they don't want to upgrade the .NET runtime to something more up to date. Managed code execution can be as fast as native code, just not with that old version of Mono which also never was that much optimized. Hope is they'll at some point get the CoreCLR in, which is supposedly way faster.
Problem with things like IL2CPP / DOTS / whatever special stuff they do: It's not completely generic. DOTS means you have to write code specifically for it, IL2CPP at least means you lose moddability of games (just thinking of games like Subnautica that were never meant to be modded but still get a lot of mods because people *can* do so) ... And while DOTS *might* have uses in certain situations to speed up code that can benefit from parallelization or CPU features IL2CPP really does not give that much benefit over just getting a good .NET runtime in that will benefit to *all* managed code you run, no matter if it's your own or third party libraries.

The only advantage in IL2CPP I can see: Devs who are really worried about others copying their code, as it's of course quite a bit harder with native code than CIL code.