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Latest Comments by TheSHEEEP
Airships: Conquer the Skies will have you build a Steampunk airship full of cannons, out now
20 August 2018 at 2:35 pm UTC

I have this game on my wishlist since a very long time.
It looks really interesting - and yeah, satisfying.

The original The Banner Saga is no longer officially supported on Linux
15 August 2018 at 2:57 pm UTC

Doc Angelo
TheSHEEEPAnd what the devs of Banner Saga did was just ill-informed, as Adobe announced dropping linux support very early, yet they choose to use AIR for a cross-platform effort.
If the Banner Saga devs would have started development before Adobe announced that they drop Linux support, would it have been a good idea, because Adobe is a big company with big money? What good is that if they drop support anyway?
Actually, it would have been a terrible idea anyway, because AIR is a terrible product.
If it was a good product, then it would have been a good idea, yes. Middleware dropping platform support for platforms that are actually alive (even if not really for games, back then) was almost unheard of - and still is.
And as I said multiple times by now - even if it would have been open source, the developers couldn't have maintained a +linux branch due to lack of resources, and if someone else would have done that (and of what quality) is in the stars.

Doc AngeloAnyway... if everybody would make business decisions like you suggest, we wouldn't have games on Linux - because we wouldn't even have Linux. Linux was that purely "hobbyist" product you speak of. Companies have started to use it, and they succeeded. Is the whole history of Linux a "risky business decision" for you? Would you have advised to use Windows, because they have paid employees?
I'm sorry, but your idealistic viewpoint completely blends out reality and common sense.

It started out as an hobbist product, sure. But its advantages were so obvious that people started using it and then an industry started forming around it. Industry = money, and that money is what kept and keeps it kicking. Take that (partially closed source, btw.) industry away and we're back at square 1.

And in those crucial years of 1995-2000, when that industry formed, there honestly were no good server platforms available that came close. Running a Windows server was utter trash, and that was known.
Linux wasn't successful just because it was open source (though that may have helped), it was successful primarily because it did something better than everything else. In other words, there was no equal competition - and it was free, too. Whoa!
Yes, even then, picking linux was a risk. But a risk offset by a serious performance advantage.

You can blare about FOSS and idealism all you want, but if you have a choice between a small FOSS project that does what you want, but has like a handful of people developing it in their free time - and a closed source alternative that does the same thing and doesn't cost a lot, then you pick the closed source one if you can afford it and the support is known to be good.
Because that gives you access to people who are paid to aid you in your requests - while FOSS gives you the chance that nobody does anything about your issues or the whole project gets dropped.

I'm not against FOSS, don't get me wrong. There are many FOSS projects that are just outright better than possible closed source alternatives - SDL comes to mind. What matters in the end is the quality, though, not if it is open source or not.

The best case scenario is something like Godot which combines financial stability with open source. It doesn't have the plugin ecosystem of Unity yet, but that is something I grew very cautios about as those plugins are often just shoddy and end up causing more harm than good.

The original The Banner Saga is no longer officially supported on Linux
15 August 2018 at 9:14 am UTC

Doc AngeloSituation B: You are using FOSS. The devs of this software are stopping support for it or are removing features you depend on. You are now allowed to take the source code and maintain your own fork of it that doesn't remove what you need.

That a FOSS project removes functionality people are using is already less likely to happen. But even if it happens, you are not without options. That is a really, if not the biggest, argument for FOSS in businesses.
I marked the hopelessly optimistic part.
That is just what I wrote. Sure you could do that in theory, but most devs, especially small ones, simply do not have the resources to do that.
An option is worthless if it is purely theoretical. For all practical intents and purposes, there is no difference between both situations.

Doc Angelo
TheSHEEEPdo you truly want to place your products in the hand of some hobbyist who might just drop the whole thing again due to lack of interest or free time?

If people wouldn't do exactly that, we wouldn't have gaming on Linux.
And which game that runs on linux actually makes use of free open source engines that are not being maintained by someone who is actually paid?
Compare that to the amount of games made on engines by people who maintain said engine for a living.

It's just not a wise business decision to place your own products in the hands of pure hobbyists.
You also cannot compare that situation to software like Ubuntu, which is open source, but its developers (at least partly) do earn money with the ecosystem around Ubuntu.
Godot is similar in that the main devs do earn their living with the engine.
I consider both Ubuntu and Godot very safe to use, as they combine the open source benefits with the stability of people actually being paid.

But placing your software in the hands of projects that do not have a monetary backup means letting lady luck decide, and that is risky at best.
And what the devs of Banner Saga did was just ill-informed, as Adobe announced dropping linux support very early, yet they choose to use AIR for a cross-platform effort.

The original The Banner Saga is no longer officially supported on Linux
14 August 2018 at 2:30 pm UTC Likes: 1

ArehandoroOn the other hand, about the 1/4 of gains from the cost... well, it's ta vicious circle. If there isn't a proper supported port, there aren't sells. If they don't sell, the port isn't profiterol* and so on.
A lot of linux gamers likely also didn't buy the game because part 2 and 3 are not on linux.
What would be the point, really?

The original The Banner Saga is no longer officially supported on Linux
14 August 2018 at 1:07 pm UTC Likes: 3

Doc Angelo
TheSHEEEPMore like a reason not to use Adobe AIR (or other Adobe products for that matter).

Na, I really extend it to all closed source projects. Better be safe than sorry.
What safety?

If the maintainers of some project decide to drop linux, there's nothing you can do about that, either. The chances of someone picking up the pieces and continuing the support in their free time are slim at best - nothing a developer using the software can rely on. And even if that happens, do you truly want to place your products in the hand of some hobbyist who might just drop the whole thing again due to lack of interest or free time?
Sure, the developer could maintain the linux part themselves, maybe backporting changes from the main branch, but that would be costly which is exactly the problem the devs here faced when they hired someone to do a port.

Open source or not has absolutely nothing to do with the problem.

The original The Banner Saga is no longer officially supported on Linux
14 August 2018 at 1:00 pm UTC Likes: 6

Doc AngeloThat right there is one big reason why one shouldn't rely on closed source products.
More like a reason not to use Adobe AIR (or other Adobe products for that matter).
Even when Flash was still a thing, AIR was just downright terrible, with bugs galore, cross-platform support shoddy (including Mac and Android), memory leaks, performance problems and so on and so forth.

When they claim Adobe was strongly supporting linux, that's just nonsense. That has never been the case as long as I can remember - and I had the "honor" of working with it and Flash back then.

Set Phasers to fun! Stage 9 lets you explore the Enterprise-D from Star Trek The Next Generation on Linux
13 August 2018 at 8:06 pm UTC Likes: 1

Doc AngeloAs a kid, I enjoyed TNG, DS9 and VOY. Returning to the series nearly two decades later, TNG turned out to be even better than I remembered. I enjoyed it massively. DS9 and VOY however left my quite cold. I stopped DS9 after two seasons, and VOY after a couple episodes.

It's always interesting to see how different each show is and how they are seen by Trek fans.
Voyager and TNG are relatively alike in that they focus on the "adventures" of one ship around space and the characters on that ship, which are (almost) entirely Starfleet.
I think most prefer TNG between those two (as I do, but I don't dislike Voyager either).

DS9 is very different, and as I think, at least occasionally more interesting.
Instead of focusing on a limited crew in a changing environment, it focuses on a set environment and different cultures, races, politics, intrigues, etc. within that environment in times of strife.
DS9 gives you a much better feeling of what living in that world actually means for the common people, and goes way deeper into different racial cultures than TNG or Voyager do - as those (almost) only focus on the absolute elite, Starfleet.

Of course, which focus one likes more is different. I might be torn between DS9 and TNG as I am by nature not a very... "lawful" person and thus more interested in grey areas.
On the other hand, no captain comes close to Picard and Sisko is arguably just not the most interesting person (lacks edges).
In the end, I think I like the basic idea of DS9 more, while I prefer the actual execution of TNG.

Set Phasers to fun! Stage 9 lets you explore the Enterprise-D from Star Trek The Next Generation on Linux
13 August 2018 at 5:13 pm UTC Likes: 1

wvstolzingBy the way, is the new PatStew series at all related to the next season of 'Discovery'?
Unlikely.
Time travel has always been a minor part of Star Trek, but never really played the main role - which is great, as time travel usually tends to make storylines ugly and messy.

Discovery is about 150 years prior to the new Star Trek series (as that will be set pretty much exactly 20 years after Nemesis).
So any connection between them could only be very artificial so I hope they keep that to a minimum.

Getting Over It with Bennett Foddy now has a Linux build for testing
13 August 2018 at 11:02 am UTC Likes: 2

EikeIsn't life hurting enough?
Yeah, I don't get why anyone plays this.

I'd rather shoot myself in the foot and would probably gain more from the pain than from playing this ... "game".

Language learning game Lingotopia to release on August 16th with Linux support
11 August 2018 at 12:37 pm UTC

Any idea how the Chinese integration is?
I've played a few other learning games and tested a bunch of apps, but many have the huge problem of not dealing with the fact that learning Chinese doesn't work like learning a western language, as pronunciation and the symbols/characters are (almost) entirely separate things. Some didn't even have pinyin, making them basically entirely useless.

Most learning games I played are little more than interactive dictionaries.
And learning with those is borderline useless as well, as they don't even apply a spaced repetition system.
Claiming that learning words is the most important part of learning a language is almost within lie territory, too. The most important parts are understanding the grammar and flow of the language, especially if said grammar and flow is very different from your own language. Increasing your vocabulary happens naturally over time as you learn the rest - it doesn't work the other way around, knowing a thousand words won't help you form a correct sentence.

I do not know this specific game, but if it is like others, you'd be better off learning basics with specific apps or books (if you feel truly hardcore) and then dive right into a normal game, set to the language you want to learn and play the game with a dictionary/browser open in the background.

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